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Suttree [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Cormac Mccarthy
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Kurzbeschreibung

1. Januar 2010
This compelling novel has as its protagonist Cornelius Suttree, living alone and in exile in a disintegrating houseboat on the wrong side of the Tennessee River close by Knoxville. He stays at the edge of an outcast community inhabited by eccentrics, criminals and the poverty-stricken. Rising above the physical and human squalor around him, his detachment and wry humour enable him to survive dereliction and destitution with dignity. 'Suttree marks McCarthy's closest approach to autobiography and is probably the funniest and most unbearably sad of his books' Stanley Booth 'The book comes at us like a horrifying flood. The language licks, batters, wounds -- a poetic, troubled rush of debris ...Cormac McCarthy has little mercy to spare, for his characters or himself. His text is broken, beautiful and ugly in spots ...Suttree is like a good, long scream in the ear.' Jerome Charyn, New York Times

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Suttree + Blood Meridian: or The Evening Redness in the West + Child of God
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 480 Seiten
  • Verlag: Picador (1. Januar 2010)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0330511238
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330511230
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13 x 19,7 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (16 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 58.123 in Englische Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Englische Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Cormac McCarthy wurde 1933 in Rhodes Island geboren und wuchs in Knoxville/Tennessee, auf. Für seine Bücher wurde er u. a. mit dem William Faulkner Award, dem American Academy Award, dem National Book Award und dem National Book Crities Circle Award ausgezeichnet. 2007 erhielt er für seinen epochalen Roman Die Straße den Pulitzerpreis. McCarthy lebt heute in El Paso, Texas. "Kein Land für alte Männer" wurde von den Coen-Brüdern fürs Kino verfilmt.

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

""Suttree" contains a humour that is Faulknerian in its gentle wryness, and a freakish imaginative flair reminiscent of Flannery O'Connor." --"The Times Literary Supplement" (London) "All of McCarthy's books present the reviewer with the same welcome difficulty. They are so good that one can hardly say how good they really are. . . . "Suttree" may be his magnum opus. Its protagonist, Cornelius Suttree, has forsaken his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat among the inhabitants of the demimonde along the banks of the Tennessee River. His associates are mostly criminals of one sort or another, and Suttree is, to say the least, estranged from what might be called normal society. But he is so involved with life (and it with him) that when in the end he takes his leave, the reader's heart goes with him. "Suttree" is probably the funniest and most unbearably sad of McCarthy's books . . . which seem to me unsurpassed in American literature." --Stanley Booth

Synopsis

Cornelius Suttree renounces the values held by his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat among the depraved residents on the banks of the Tennessee River. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Einleitungssatz
Peering down into the water where the morning sun fashioned wheels of light, coronets fanwise in which lay trapped each twig, each grin of sediment, long flakes and blades of light in the dusty water sliding away like optic strobes where motes sifted and spun. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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Kundenrezensionen

4.8 von 5 Sternen
4.8 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen get ye some plot structure 22. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
I love C. McCarthy, but I was a little disappointed with this book. I've read the first two volumes of The Border Trilogy, and I feel that McCarthy's capacity for transcendent mythic prose is better suited to the stark landscape of Mexico and Texas, rather than this grimy Southern river life. In the border novels his lack of narrative structure works well as a picture of existential drift. His heroes need to be on the road someplace, rather than stranded in a town. I wanted Harrogate to be the hero, and I wanted him to steal a car and drive to Mexico.
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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An intelligent anti-intellectual treat 11. Juli 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
If we turn to our hymnals, (Suttree, p. 414):
"Of what would you repent? ... One thing. I spoke with bitterness about my life and I said that I would take my own part against the slander of oblivion and against the monstrous facelessness of it and that I would stand a stone in the very void where all would read my name. Of that vanity I recant all."
Forget the comparisons to Faulkner, Melville, and any other fashionable names, or themes that somehow make Suttree sound like he's on a Harry Potter journey. ("Suttree and the Magical Midnight Mellonhumper"?) Or existential searches for meaning. (Can one have an existential search for meaning? But I digress.) Cormac McCarthy has his own unique voice, and it is, well, feculently good in this novel about the self-delusions of one man, Cornelius Suttree, as he attempts to rectify life, having been brought into the world at the same time as his stillborn twin brother. It is a novel to be experienced. The dialogue is stunningly true and a joy to read, and in unique McCarthy fashion, he finds a way to make sublime psychological observations about his characters without resorting to reading their thoughts. Here is a novel that recounts those "living on the edge" without the sentimental romantic claptrap of the Beat writers or Rousseau-rustic rubes. Sure, some of the writing is overwrought -- he spent 20 years writing the thing -- but it's still purty, and it's still McCarthy. To put a label on it, I'd call it a classic in the Southern American anti-intellectual tradition. What that means is this: long after people have tired of reading David Foster Wallace make fun of midwesterners who shop at K mart, or Philip Roth rhapsodizing about his penis, people will be reading the likes of Faulkner, O'Conner and McCarthy for a deeper understanding of our culture, our longings and our mythos. (Sorry. Couldn't help myself. Apologies to Melville.)
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Powerfully written 18. Mai 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
McCarthy's style of writing is difficult at first, because he is quite poetic and his vocabulary is freaking huge. And he often doesn't obey grammatical rules. I found it helped to read particularly difficult passages out loud -- they're worth understanding.
The novel is long, but good. It is an episodic tale of Cornelius Suttree, A fisherman/bum along the shores of some river in Knoxville, Tennessee. He has left a family of influence to live in this poverty, though that's not as important to the book as it sounds. While the book is rather episodic -- sometimes it's hard to connect one chapter to the next in any meaningful form -- the characters are vivid, and the episodes are imaginative and often funny -- or sad.
This book is powerfully written, and an enjoyable read. I can't wait to read more McCarthy -- or to read this one over again.
A writing sample:
"He woke with the undersides of his eyelids inflamed by the high sun's hammering, looked up to a bland and chinablue sky traversed by lightwires. A big lemoncolored cat watched him from the top of a woodstove. He turned his head to see it better and it elongated itself like hot taffy down the side of the stove and vanished headfirst in the earth without a sound. Suttree lay with his hands palm up at his sides in an attitude of frailty beheld and the stink that fouled the air was he himself. He closed his eyes and moaned. A hot breeze was coming across the barren waste of burnt weeds and rubble like a whiff of battlesmoke. Some starling had alighted on a wire overhaed in perfect progression like a peice of knotted string fallen slantwise. Crooning, hooked wings. Foul yellow mutes came squeezing from under their fanned tails. He sat up slowly, putting a hand over his eyes. The birds flew.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Beautiful Ugliness 28. Juli 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This is a most extraordinary novel, densely packed with dark and dire images, by turns brutal and tender. It is elegant, down and dirty, occasionally shocking and surprisingly funny. I don't know when I have read more beautiful prose describing more debased circumstances than in Suttree.
I was introduced to this novel by a close friend who was so slammed by the impact of the first page that she had to put it down for a week just to let it sink in. I have to admit, I re-read the first 3 pages about a dozen times throughout my reading of the novel. They do pack a wallop. Actually, there are several passages in the book that so floored me I had to go back and re-read them.
The language of this tale is incredible, carefully wrought, full of fantastic words (keep a dictionary close by.) At times laconic, at times incredibly detailed. And at times so unrelentingly down and out you just have to laugh. Harold Pinter once praised Samuel Beckett saying that he 'leaves no stone unturned, no maggot lonely.' I'd say the same for McCarthy in this novel. Who else could generate so much sympathy for a melon-humping hayseed dork like Gene Harrogate? Or any other of the motley assemblage with whom Suttree inexplicably chooses to fraternize.
I don't want to ruin any surprises, so I'll just assure you that Suttree's immersion in debauchery and desolation is not for its own sake. The book has a heart. The book has soul to burn. This is just the best damned novel I've read in years. Maybe ever. Relish it.
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Cormac McCarthy is a genious.
If there can be a genre such as Southern Fiction, then the category is ruled hands down by Cormac McCarthy. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 23. April 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen This was such a strange feeling...
I read Suttree about two years ago, and like all of the other readers who commented, I was floored. Last week, I read Faulkner's Sanctuary, and when I got to the section of the... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 1. September 1999 von Stephen Quinn
5.0 von 5 Sternen Superior
This is a superior work by perhaps the finest living American writer. None better. If you aren't moved by this guy's work, your better check your pulse.
Veröffentlicht am 5. August 1999 von Alfred B. Shapiro
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ensnared
I cant get enough of McCarthy's vision of the seamy, brutal, freakish grace of the South. No victims or sentimentality. No spoonfeeding here. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 3. August 1999 von M. Meszaros
5.0 von 5 Sternen an astounding american novel, a celebration of our language.
what an awe-inspiring work this novel is. if you were introduced to mr. mccarthy through the border trilogy, please explore "blood meridian" and especially this... Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 20. Juni 1999 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Faulkner's heir
In Sutree McCarthy uses more of the English language to better effect than any other contemporary American writer. Characters are fully developed with only a few lines. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 18. Mai 1999 von Bill Butler
5.0 von 5 Sternen Incredible incredible
As the sergeant in Blood Meridian (written six years after Suttree) says when the Indians appear-- Oh my god. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 20. November 1998 von crook002@bama.ua.edu
5.0 von 5 Sternen Moonshine, trotlines, waste...
Rich, biblical prose. Set alongside big old river. All about bums. There's a hilarious wacky kid the hero tries to take care of sometimes. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 1. September 1998 von Jeff Potter
4.0 von 5 Sternen Suttree: an existentialist's search for meaning.
Cormac McCarthy treats the reader to a splendid tale of one man's search for meaning. Cornelius Suttree, a college-educated man recently released from prison, searches for meaning... Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 18. Juli 1998 veröffentlicht
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