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The Sound of the Mountain (Penguin Modern Classics) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 6. Januar 2011


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 224 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin Classics (6. Januar 2011)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0141192623
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141192628
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 12,9 x 1,3 x 19,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 209.170 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Kawabata is a poet of the gentlest shades, of the evanescent, the imperceptible.”
Commonweal
 
“A rich, complicated novel. . . . Of all modern Japanese fiction, Kawabata’s is the closest to poetry.”
The New York Times Book Review -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

Synopsis

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 23. April 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This is arguably one of Kawabata's best works. After reading and rereading it over many years, my admiration for Kawabata as a writer only increases. There is something so comforting about the domesticity in this book, despite any problems in the domestic landscape. The style of the book and the writing is pure genius. It captures the essence of the lives it portrays like poetic prose. There is zen in the simplicity and the structure of this book. It makes you want to get up and move to Japan, or at least visit. It makes you want to learn Japanese so that you can read this beautiful writing in the original, even though the Sidensticker translation is great in itself. I'm still thinking about what the sound of the mountain could be. Kawabata is the apex of world literature, and this book is very highly recommended.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Bob Newman am 17. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Kawabata Yasunari won the Nobel Prize in 1968 and this novel above all his others, in my opinion, gives readers a chance to find out why. This is a classic of world literature, a work of genius. It is a finely-written tale of family, a simple story about an older man who is fond of his daughter-in-law, though his relations with his own two grown children, son and divorced daughter, are ambiguous. The story line, as in other Kawabata novels, is simple----there are no great events, no dramatic conclusions or climaxes. Natural phenomena---birds, animals, plants, and weather---play a large role in setting the mood and are used as symbols throughout. Far from being a recurring theme, the "sound of the mountain" is heard only once, on page 10, yet it and many other signs presage changes in life that follow a pattern unseen by human eyes.
The most amazing thing about THE SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN is its capacity to summarize or to encapsulate family life, the compexity of family relationships. The only other book I know that comes close is Christina Stead's "The Man Who Loved Children", but that is a most verbose book whose characters verbalize nearly every emotion, or else the author does it for them. Kawabata's novel, however, succeeds in portraying family life equally well, if not better, with an absolute minimum of brush strokes. The indecision, the steps not taken, the regrets, the lost loves who return in dreams---all the myriad small events from which marriages and families are constructed---flow in a way that is both typically Japanese and universal. Shingo, the old man, was particularly kind towards Kikuko, his daughter in law, who "was for him a window looking out of a gloomy house." "Kindness towards her was a beam lighting isolation.
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Format: Taschenbuch
A haunting, evocative novel of family life in the immediate aftermath of the second world war. Shingo, the grandfather of the family, describes the relationships between his children and their partners, interwoven with flashbacks of his own early life. The disharmony of their lives is overwritten with a sense of Shingo's personal unfulfillment and unrequited love for the long dead sister of his wife. A constant theme of the novel is the decline in the powers of Shingo as head of the family and his inability to shape the destiny of his children as the story unfolds.

This is a beautifully written book, rich in the culture of Japan which maintains a sense of melancholy throughout yet accurately reflects the mundane nature of day to day family existence. A highly recommended, gentle read.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 28. Juni 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
good boo
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 28 Rezensionen
68 von 69 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
That's the Sound of Life, That's the Sound of Death 17. Juli 2000
Von Bob Newman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Kawabata Yasunari won the Nobel Prize in 1968 and this novel above all his others, in my opinion, gives readers a chance to find out why. This is a classic of world literature, a work of genius. It is a finely-written tale of family, a simple story about an older man who is fond of his daughter-in-law, though his relations with his own two grown children, son and divorced daughter, are ambiguous. The story line, as in other Kawabata novels, is simple----there are no great events, no dramatic conclusions or climaxes. Natural phenomena---birds, animals, plants, and weather---play a large role in setting the mood and are used as symbols throughout. Far from being a recurring theme, the "sound of the mountain" is heard only once, on page 10, yet it and many other signs presage changes in life that follow a pattern unseen by human eyes.
The most amazing thing about THE SOUND OF THE MOUNTAIN is its capacity to summarize or to encapsulate family life, the compexity of family relationships. The only other book I know that comes close is Christina Stead's "The Man Who Loved Children", but that is a most verbose book whose characters verbalize nearly every emotion, or else the author does it for them. Kawabata's novel, however, succeeds in portraying family life equally well, if not better, with an absolute minimum of brush strokes. The indecision, the steps not taken, the regrets, the lost loves who return in dreams---all the myriad small events from which marriages and families are constructed---flow in a way that is both typically Japanese and universal. Shingo, the old man, was particularly kind towards Kikuko, his daughter in law, who "was for him a window looking out of a gloomy house." "Kindness towards her was a beam lighting isolation. It was a way of pampering himself, of bringing a touch of mellowness into his life." There is nothing so definite (or crass) as an out-and-out love affair between the two. Rather, there are solutions that are no solutions, compromises that have to paper over the disappointments. Life goes on and Hollywood is for children. What a brilliant book !
23 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
This too, shall pass 1. Juli 2004
Von Zack Davisson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
"The Sound of the Mountain" ("Yama no Oto") should have been a script for an Yasujiro Ozu film. All of the elements are here, with the kindly aged father Shingo who cannot gain his children's respect or love, ready to be portrayed by Chishu Ryu, and the lovely and loving daughter-in-law Kikuko, far more understanding than his real children, designed exactly for Setsuko Hara. The family who has left its rural home to uproot to Tokyo, following the jobs, losing their heart in the process. It really is too perfect.
Instead, the story is guided by the gentle hand of Yasunari Kawabata, who gives us the Japanese family, still disheveled by the end of the war and not quite certain what their roles are and dealing with their loss of identity. Confucian ideals, such as respect for the elder parents, have been swept aside in the post-Occupation reality. Shingo's son Shuichi has come back from the war an indifferent, cold-hearted man, flaunting his affairs with neither spite nor pleasure. Shingo's wife, Yasuko, is an ugly reminder of her sister, whom Shingo loved in is youth yet died. Their daughter Fusako is a burden, returning home with ugly children, her husband a waste and their marriage broken. The only pleasure in his life is the daughter-in-law Kikuko, whom his son wounds daily with his lack of caring.
In the Kawabata style, there is neither complaint nor surface rage at life's inconstant fortunes, but rather an acceptance and perseverance. Life is about moving forward, even at the advanced age of Shingo and Yasuko, who take their burdens as they come. Shingo is the main character, and so this is a book of old age, of looking back at life's mistakes and longing for fading pleasures. "The Sound of the Mountain" is a brilliant, cherishable book, one that captivated and moved me.
Interestingly enough, "The Sound of the Mountain" was eventually made into a movie, and while Ozu didn't get to direct, Setsuko Hara did get the part of Kikuko. Someone else must have had the same idea.
17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Haunting novel of family life in post war Japan 1. Juli 1997
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
A haunting, evocative novel of family life in the immediate aftermath of the second world war. Shingo, the grandfather of the family, describes the relationships between his children and their partners, interwoven with flashbacks of his own early life. The disharmony of their lives is overwritten with a sense of Shingo's personal unfulfillment and unrequited love for the long dead sister of his wife. A constant theme of the novel is the decline in the powers of Shingo as head of the family and his inability to shape the destiny of his children as the story unfolds.

This is a beautifully written book, rich in the culture of Japan which maintains a sense of melancholy throughout yet accurately reflects the mundane nature of day to day family existence. A highly recommended, gentle read.
11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Synopsis of the story 14. Februar 2002
Von Bärchen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Written by Nobel-prize winning author Y. Kawabata, "The Sound of the Mountain" is a stunning and complex novel about the family life of Ogata Shingo. Shingo, head of the household, is deeply troubled by the moral decay of his children's families. Shuichi, his son, is married to Kikuko, but carries on an affair for a year, which results in a....... child by his lover and an abortion by his wife. Fusako, Shingo's daughter, separates and later divorces her drug-addicted husband to live with her two young children at her parents' house. Both of Shingo's children disrespect him and think little of him because of his absent-mindedness. These periods of thoughts are filled with beautiful imagery of nature's sounds, smells, and scenes. However, increasingly Shingo's dreams bring him anguish over his moral responsibilty, his hidden love for his daughter-in-law, Kikuko, and his desire for the beauty of his wife's younger sister, his late first wife. In the end, family ties hold this microcosm of Japanese life together--for better or for worse.
16 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
One of the Finest Books Ever Written 8. September 2001
Von Lisa R. Everett - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I love Japanese literature. Unlike American writers - who overdo both their descriptions and their passions - Japanese writers, especially Kawabata, demonstrate taste. Like the beautiful, small cherry blossom, Kawabata's book is exquisite in its understatement. Only in Japanese literature could you have a father-in-law be completely in love with his daughter-in-law and not have the entire thing reduced to some graphic affair. This story is quietly profound. American readers who are in for action or blatant romance will not enjoy it, but if you are a reader who likes a book that makes you recognize your own silent yearnings - then this is the book for you. But I warn you, you will need to read it at least twice to really get it. Since the underlying theme of this novel is the dwindling of life, I recommend reading this novel in the fall or when you are feeling your own body failing.
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