Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Den Verlag informieren!
Ich möchte dieses Buch auf dem Kindle lesen.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Soccernomics: Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey--And Even Iraq--Are Destined [ SOCCERNOMICS: WHY ENGLAND LOSES, WHY GERMANY AND BRAZIL WIN, AND WHY THE U.S., JAPAN, AUSTRALIA, TURKEY--AND EVEN IRAQ--ARE DESTINED ] by Kuper, Simon (Author) Oct-01-2009 [ Paperback ] [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Simon Kuper
4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)

Erhältlich bei diesen Anbietern.


Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch --  

Hinweise und Aktionen


Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch
  • Verlag: Nation Books (1. Oktober 2009)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B005HKMTMA
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 20,6 x 14 x 2,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 2.413.445 in Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Bücher)

Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Nach einer anderen Ausgabe dieses Buches suchen.
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Eine digitale Version dieses Buchs im Kindle-Shop verkaufen

Wenn Sie ein Verleger oder Autor sind und die digitalen Rechte an einem Buch haben, können Sie die digitale Version des Buchs in unserem Kindle-Shop verkaufen. Weitere Informationen

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
4.0 von 5 Sternen
4.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Das Buch ist super interessant. Viele Fakten werden darin beschrieben, auf die man sonst in Medien nie zutrifft. Vor allem die Tiefe, in die die beiden Autoren gehen, macht das Buch noch spannender. Aber nach einige Stories, wirkt das Buch nicht mehr so doll. Nach einer gewissen Lesezeit tritt eine Monotonie ein. Es sind keine spannende Geschichten dabei, die einen Leser dazu anregen weiter zu lesen.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen very entertaining read 27. Dezember 2011
Von greene
Format:Taschenbuch
Very Entertaining read. for any football fan interested in tactics, soccer business aspects, statistics and world politics... some of the arguments proposed border on irony and satire, but others seem very interesting at second glance. written excellently, i would have loved to find a follow-up book of this type.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 von 5 Sternen  59 Rezensionen
31 von 36 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting / Boring / Fascinating 31. Dezember 2009
Von D. M. Kemp - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I was made aware of this book when I heard one of the authors give an interview. Many of the topics in the interview weren't in the book, but a host of other areas where. The book is easy to read and well researched. However, it is very much written from a British point of view - so don't let the Americanized title of Soccernomics fool you. It mainly appears to be a book that hopes to explain to the English that they are not the most rabid fans nor the best players of the game they invented 150 years ago.

Some of the chapters were so absolutely fascinating, I couldn't stop reading. Other chapters were so ultimately boring that I skipped them. The good thing is that you can skip around and read each chapter independently without really losing any overall scope of the book.

Even though I didn't agree with some the conclusions and read the data differently, I certainly feel much more knowledgeable about the current game and how we got here. If you are a fan of soccer, you should seriously consider this fact-filled book. It will make for great discussions around the TV during next summer's World Cup.
38 von 45 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Best. Soccer. Book. Ever. 27. November 2009
Von Paul Allaer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Simon Kuper is the long-time weekly sports columnist in the Financial Times, and he is one of the reasons I so look forward to reading the Weekend Edition of the pink paper. When I saw that he had authored a new book about soccer, and then saw more details about what the book would be about, I knew I just had to have it and ordered it here on Amazon at a very purchase-friendly price.

"Soccernomics: Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey--And Even Iraq--Are Destined To Become The Kings of the World's Most Popular Sport" (336 pages) is co-written by Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski, a British economist. An economist, you might ask? Yes indeed, as this book brings a fascinating look into the numbers of soccer. Here a couple of quotes from the book:

-- "In 2002 everyone knew that the obscure, bucktoothed Brazilian kid Ronaldinho must have lucked out with the free kick that sailed into England's net, because he couldn't have been good enough to place it deliberately." (commenting on the English belief of freakish bad luck for their national team).

-- "Our finding: England in the 1980-2001 period outscored its opponents by 0.84 goals per game. That was 0.21 more than we had predicted based on the country's resources. In short, England was not underperforming at all. Contrary to popular opinion, it was over-performing."

-- "Soccer is not only small business business. It's also a bad one. Anyone who spends any time inside soccer discovers that just as oil is part of the oil business, stupidity is part of the soccer business."

-- "Provincial towns like Nottingham, Glasgow, Dortmund, Birmingham or Rotterdam all have won European Cups, while the seven biggest metropolitan areas in Europe--Istanbul, Paris, Moscow, London, St. Petersburg, Berlin and Athens--never have. This points to an odd connection between city size, capital cities and soccer success."

-- "Against all evidence, the stereotype persists that the typical British fan is a full-on Hornby."

-- "Staging a World Cup won't make you rich, but it does tend to cheer you up." (commenting on, among other things, the bogus arguments that staging a large sports event brings significant positive economic consequences for the host).

But if there is only one chapter that I had to pick out from this book, hands down it is "The Economist's Fear of the Penalty Kick", an absolute riveting look at the scientific side of the dreaded penalty kick. Using the analysis developed in game theory, the authors examine how penalty kicks are taken (by the kicker) and defended (by the keeper). It culminates with an in-depth analysis of the Manchester United-Chelsea penalty shoot-out at the 2008 CHampions League final. "Then, in what must have been a chilling moment for Anelka, the Dutch [keeper] pointed with with his left hand to the left corner. 'That's where you're all putting it, isn't it?' he seemed to be saying. Now Anelka had a terrible dilemma. This was game theory in its rawest form". (You'll have to read the rest of it yourself...)

Of all the books on soccer that I have read in my life time, I cannot recall being more enthralled and entertained than by this book. This is a page-turner from start to finish, and for me one of the very best books of the year, sports or otherwise. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
26 von 31 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent Read and Offers Surprise Truths About The World's Game 21. November 2009
Von Laurence Zimmerman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Offers some very interesting insights into the world of soccer. While some compare it to Michael Lewis's "Moneyball", it differs in that "Moneyball" deals more with baseball at the micro level, while "Soccernomics" deals with soccer at a macro level. There is a lot of statistical analysis of national teams, but no analysis of individual players. In essence this is one of the difficulties of soccer, as it does not naturally lend itself to extreme statistical analysis like baseball does.

My main argument with the book is that it treats the NFL as the US's main export sport. While the NFL is undoubtedly the most popular league in the United States, this is a recent phenomenon. Baseball has traditionally been "America's Past Time" and thus is the sport that the United States spread around the world, although not to the same level that the English spread soccer.

One analysis that I wanted to read about was the success of Latin American teams. In particular an analysis of Mexico and Brazil. Both countries are soccer crazy and have very large populations, but Brazil has won five World Cups and Mexico none. It would be interesting to see an analysis of why this has happend, but the book mainly deals with European teams as their statistics are more reliable.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Enjoyable 14. Januar 2010
Von R. Albin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
A well written collaboration between an experienced sports journalist and an economist interests in applying statistical and econometric methods to sports. Definitely pitched to soccer fans, this book is a series of chapters exploring different aspects of soccer. Topics include the nature of fandom, how to function in the transfer market successfully, why some nations do well in international tournaments, the psychology of penalty kicks, profitability of soccer clubs, and several other relevant subjects. The authors generally draw on statistical and economic methods, often drawing on the work of other economists and statisticians interested in sports. The authors generally reach well founded though somewhat iconoclastic conclusions.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent, interesting, engaging 6. Januar 2010
Von M. E. Bobola - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Soccernomics is a fantastic look at a soccer from a completely different point-of-view than you're probably used to seeing. Using statistical techniques like regression and massive amounts of old match results and other data related to both the classic and modern game of soccer, Kuper and Szymanski bring a new insight to how we think of the beautiful game. There are sections on national teams, club teams, and fans, and they all bring a style similar to Freakonomics and its look at different popular subjects. The entire thing is written in an easy-to-read style, with entertaining anecdotes mixed in with clearly communicated results of statistical research. It sounds dry when you think about the premise, but there are no formulas written out or in-depth discussions of math or anything like that. If you are interested in soccer and the culture that surrounds it, you could scarcely do better than checking out this fantastic book.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar