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Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories (Part 1) [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
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Kurzbeschreibung

1. November 1986 Sherlock Holmes (Buch 1)
Sherlock Holmes
The Complete Novels and Stories

Volume I

Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero--a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime!

Volume I includes the early novel A Study in Scarlet, which introduced the eccentric genius of Sherlock Holmes to the world. This baffling murder mystery, with the cryptic word Rache written in blood, first brought Holmes together with Dr. John Watson. Next, The Sign of Four presents Holmes’s famous “seven percent solution” and the strange puzzle of Mary Morstan in the quintessential locked-room mystery.

Also included are Holmes’s feats of extraordinary detection in such famous cases as the chilling “ The Adventure of the Speckled Band,” the baffling riddle of “The Musgrave Ritual,” and the ingeniously plotted “The Five Orange Pips,” tales that bring to life a Victorian England of horse-drawn cabs, fogs, and the famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street, where Sherlock Holmes earned his undisputed reputation as the greatest fictional detective of all time.

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 1088 Seiten
  • Verlag: Bantam Classics; Auflage: Reissue (1. November 1986)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0553212419
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553212419
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 17,7 x 4,6 x 10,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (6 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 35.013 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Synopsis

The eccentric detective Sherlock Holmes with the aid of Dr. Watson investigates strange and baffling mysteries.

Leseprobe. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

chapter 1



Mr. Sherlock Holmes



IN THE year 1878 I took my degree of Doctor of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Netley to go through the course prescribed for surgeons in the Army. Having completed my studies there, I was duly attached to the Fifth Northumberland Fusiliers as assistant surgeon. The regiment was stationed in India at the time, and before I could join it, the second Afghan war had broken out. On landing at Bombay, I learned that my corps had advanced through the passes, and was already deep in the enemy's country. I followed, however, with many other officers who were in the same situation as myself, and succeeded in reaching Candahar in safety, where I found my regiment, and at once entered upon my new duties.

The campaign brought honours and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but misfortune and disaster. I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand. There I was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail bullet, which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian artery. I should have fallen into the hands of the murderous Ghazis had it not been for the devotion and courage shown by Murray, my orderly, who threw me across a packhorse, and succeeded in bringing me safely to the British lines.

Worn with pain, and weak from the prolonged hardships which I had undergone, I was removed, with a great train of wounded sufferers, to the base hospital at Peshawar. Here I rallied, and had already improved so far as to be able to walk about the wards, and even to bask a little upon the veranda, when I was struck down by enteric fever, that curse of our Indian possessions. For months my life was despaired of, and when at last I came to myself and became convalescent, I was so weak and emaciated that a medical board determined that not a day should be lost in sending me back to England. I was despatched, accordingly, in the troopship Orontes, and landed a month later on Portsmouth jetty, with my health irretrievably ruined, but with permission from a paternal government to spend the next nine months in attempting to improve it.

I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air--or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained. There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leading a comfortless, meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had, considerably more freely than I ought. So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living. Choosing the latter alternative, I began by making up my mind to leave the hotel, and take up my quarters in some less pretentious and less expensive domicile.

On the very day that I had come to this conclusion, I was standing at the Criterion Bar, when someone tapped me on the shoulder, and turning round I recognized young Stamford, who had been a dresser under me at Bart's. The sight of a friendly face in the great wilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed to a lonely man. In old days Stamford had never been a particular crony of mine, but now I hailed him with enthusiasm, and he, in his turn, appeared to be delighted to see me. In the exuberance of my joy, I asked him to lunch with me at the Holborn, and we started off together in a hansom.

"Whatever have you been doing with yourself, Watson?" he asked in undisguised wonder, as we rattled through the crowded London streets. "You are as thin as a lath and as brown as a nut."

I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it by the time that we reached our destination.

"Poor devil!" he said, commiseratingly, after he had listened to my misfortunes. "What are you up to now?"

"Looking for lodgings," I answered. "Trying to solve the problem as to whether it is possible to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price."

"That's a strange thing," remarked my companion; "you are the second man today that has used that expression to me."

"And who was the first?" I asked.

"A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory up at the hospital. He was bemoaning himself this morning because he could not get someone to go halves with him in some nice rooms which he had found, and which were too much for his purse."

"By Jove!" I cried; "if he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I am the very man for him. I should prefer having a partner to being alone."

Young Stamford looked rather strangely at me over his wineglass. "You don't know Sherlock Holmes yet," he said; "perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion."

"Why, what is there against him?"

"Oh, I didn't say there was anything against him. He is a little queer in his ideas--an enthusiast in some branches of science. As far as I know he is a decent fellow enough."

"A medical student, I suppose?" said I.

"No--I have no idea what he intends to go in for. I believe he is well up in anatomy, and he is a first-class chemist; but, as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes. His studies are very desultory and eccentric, but he has amassed a lot of out-of-the-way knowledge which would astonish his professors."

"Did you never ask him what he was going in for?" I asked.

"No; he is not a man that it is easy to draw out, though he can be communicative enough when the fancy seizes him."

"I should like to meet him," I said. "If I am to lodge with anyone, I should prefer a man of studious and quiet habits. I am not strong enough yet to stand much noise or excitement. I had enough of both in Afghanistan to last me for the remainder of my natural existence. How could I meet this friend of yours?"

"He is sure to be at the laboratory," returned my companion. "He either avoids the place for weeks, or else he works there from morning till night. If you like, we will drive round together after luncheon."

"Certainly," I answered, and the conversation drifted away into other channels.

As we made our way to the hospital after leaving the Holborn, Stamford gave me a few more particulars about the gentleman whom I proposed to take as a fellow-lodger.

"You mustn't blame me if you don't get on with him," he said; "I know nothing more of him than I have learned from meeting him occasionally in the laboratory. You proposed this arrangement, so you must not hold me responsible."

"If we don't get on it will be easy to part company," I answered. "It seems to me, Stamford," I added, looking hard at my companion, "that you have some reason for washing your hands of the matter. Is this fellow's temper so formidable, or what is it? Don't be mealymouthed about it."

"It is not easy to express the inexpressible," he answered with a laugh. "Holmes is a little too scientific for my tastes--it approaches to cold-bloodedness. I could imagine his giving a friend a little pinch of the latest vegetable alkaloid, not out of malevolence, you understand, but simply out of a spirit of inquiry in order to have an accurate idea of the effects. To do him justice, I think that he would take it himself with the same readiness. He appears to have a passion for definite and exact...

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Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug
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Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Originalversion in verbesserter Aufmachung 1. April 2007
Von Dodo TOP 50 REZENSENT VINE-PRODUKTTESTER
Format:Taschenbuch
In dieser neu aufgelegten zweibänden Gesamtausgabe wurde die Aufmachung deutlich verbessert: die Schrift ist größer, der Druck hochwertiger. Hier kann man, gerade wegen des günstigen Preises, gut zugreifen.

Inhaltlich lässt sich wenig zu Sherlock Holmes hinzufügen, ihn kennt jeder und eigentlich findet ihn jeder genial (was er ja auch ist).

Vielleicht noch ein paar dankbare Worte: diese Ausgaben enthalten den ungekürzten Originaltext, was ich besonders zu schätzen weiß, da ich vor Jahren an "bearbeitete" Versionen geraten bin, die nicht nur inhaltliche Schnitte aufwiesen (Die Story "The Sign of Four" beginnt eigentlich damit, dass Holmes sich genussvoll "einen Schuss" setzt, warum auch immer wurde das in den 1980ern herausgeschnitten...), sondern dabei auch gleich Doyles Stil verhunzten.

Doch hier wurde nichts geändert und "modernisiert". Gut so!

Noch eine Anmerkung: wenn man Sherlock Holmes und Watson und ihre Zwiegespräche (Watson, der moralische Menschenfreund, Holmes, der zynische Misanthrop und Analytiker) kennt, ist Dr House doppelt amüsant, denn die Charaktere House und Wilson (man beachte nur die Namen...) basieren auf Holmes und Watson.
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8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Great book , pooly presented 14. September 2002
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This is a wonderful book whith a wonderful cover.Unfortunatly you can find it difficult to read since the printed text often gets to close to the middle of the book and you sometimes have to strain you muscles in order to unfold it properly.It is possible to read but still very annoying.The second volume is in a lesser alarming condition,but at times you can also have this problem at the beginning and near the end of the book.I am very sorry to write this,but if you want to by the ultimative Sherlock Holmes collection there should be some collections better designed than this one.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Für Einsteiger 4. August 2013
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Es gibt mittlerweile zahlreiche Verfilmungen, der Sherlock Holmes Geschichten, mache mehr, manche weniger gelungen , aber um den echten Holmes kennen zu lernen muss man Doyles Texte lesen. Ich habe eine Ausgabe gesucht, die man gut mitnehmen und im Zug lesen kann. Das trifft auf die Ausgabe zu. 510 g lassen sich täglich noch ganz gut mit sich herum tragen. Es dauert natürlich, bis man 1059 Seiten gelesen hat und das sieht man den Buch dann auch an. Es gibt vielleicht schönere Ausgaben, für Einsteiger finde ich diese Ausgabe super.
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