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One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?). In other places, I found the descriptions to be a little over-intellectualized.

Ms. Vincent paid a big price for her research, suffering a breakdown as her identity became blurred with her artificial role. I'm sorry that she had that problem. I suspect it's indirect testimony to the fact that we cannot be our best unless we live life as ourselves.

I found an unexpected benefit of the book was to see how a gay woman sees men so the perspective is a two-way street for many.

I suspect that many people would gain even more from this book is they went out and experienced some of these activities for themselves to have another point of perspective.

Impressive and thought-provoking!
0Kommentar|6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?). In other places, I found the descriptions to be a little over-intellectualized.

Ms. Vincent paid a big price for her research, suffering a breakdown as her identity became blurred with her artificial role. I'm sorry that she had that problem. I suspect it's indirect testimony to the fact that we cannot be our best unless we live life as ourselves.

I found an unexpected benefit of the book was to see how a gay woman sees men so the perspective is a two-way street for many.

I suspect that many people would gain even more from this book is they went out and experienced some of these activities for themselves to have another point of perspective.

Impressive and thought-provoking!
0Kommentar|2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
One of the most impressive books I have ever read is Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. Following Mr. Griffin as he moved across his day's color line to see how his skin color changed the reactions he experienced created a searing memory for me. It was my respect for that book that brought me to Self-Made Man.

Norah Vincent's transformation from tall gay woman into a somewhat effeminate appearing man provides a very powerful reading experience as well. You have both gender and sexual orientation differences here to deal with. I admire her thoroughness and courage. The disguise preparations were extensive (down to a simulated beard and false frontal appendage), training in how to walk and talk, and research into male culture.

Many people would have been satisfied with taking on easy challenges: Ms. Vincent clearly pushed herself. She went into environments where many men wouldn't feel fully comfortable: a bowling team of friends while having little skill; working class stripper bars; dating women who have been hurt and haven't recovered; staying at a monastery; working in door-to-door sales; and a men's retreat. As a result, you see many dimensions of social class and religious differences as well.

Her observations obviously reflect who she is. She longed to build real connections to the people she fooled, but suffered from a great fear of a hostile reaction. Instead, people accepted her for who she appeared to be and were gracious when she revealed the end of her masquerade.

In her writing, I only noticed a few false notes. Some of what she's trying to experience probably depends in part on hormonal reactions so I'm not sure she fully grasped the stripper scene (but how could she?). In other places, I found the descriptions to be a little over-intellectualized.

Ms. Vincent paid a big price for her research, suffering a breakdown as her identity became blurred with her artificial role. I'm sorry that she had that problem. I suspect it's indirect testimony to the fact that we cannot be our best unless we live life as ourselves.

I found an unexpected benefit of the book was to see how a gay woman sees men so the perspective is a two-way street for many.

I suspect that many people would gain even more from this book is they went out and experienced some of these activities for themselves to have another point of perspective.

Impressive and thought-provoking!
0Kommentar|Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 15. September 2015
Startet sehr interessant, tolle Idee, hat man so noch nicht so oft gelesen.
Beginnt spannend, viele Beschreibungen bringen einen sehr zum Nachdenken.
Leider verliert sich die Autorin gegen Mitte des Buches in ewig langen Beschreibungen (zB im Kloster), Freundschaftsbeziehungen etc. und verliert so das Gesamtkonzept Mann-Frau-Gender aus den Augen. Sehr zäh und etwas öde.
Schade.
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am 24. März 2013
I admit she gets five stars from me just for pulling this off but the book is pretty good too. Norah Vincent doesn't only provide fair and helpful insight into the male psyche, she grants the reader an honest peek into the female soul as well. All of us can learn from this story.
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am 1. Juni 2013
Witzig, nachdenklich machend teilweise erschreckend. Leider wiederholt sie sich in der zweiten Hälfte des Buches des öfteren - also nicht die Erlebnisse sondern die Einschätzungen "der Männer" an sich. Aber die erste Hälfte war gut genug das Buch weiter zu empfehlen.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
Da leben nun Männer und Frauen seit Tausenden von Jahren miteinander und nun wird festgestellt: Die Verständigung zwischen den Geschlechtern ist schwierig und Ursache dafür ist der Sex.
Diese Erkenntnis kann im Grunde genommen auch schon aus zahlreichen anderen Werken entnommen werden, die jede einigermaßen sortierte Buchhandlung zum Kauf feilhält.
Trotzdem lohnt es sich, nach diesen oftmal als Kitsch rezensierten Verkaufsschlagern nun auch mal ein ernstes Buch dazu zu lesen. Und als ernsthaft muss der Ansatz von Norah schon bezeichnet werden, da sie nicht nur am Schreibtisch und in Frauenmagazinen recherchiert, sondern selbst Element des Geschehens wird.
Seelenbalsam ist die Tatsache, dass die Richtigkeit vieler Annahmen über das männliche Verhalten nun sogar von einer Frau bestätigt wird. Dies kann vielleicht helfen, das gegenseitige Verständis zwischen Mann und Frau wieder aufzubauen, welches uns über die letzten Jahrtausende gerettet hat.
Beruhigend sind die Feststellungen und Beobachtungen, dass auch Frauen zuweilen Verhalten an den Tag legen, die sie beziehungsunfähig machen - in vielen Köpfen herrscht ja noch die Meinung, dass an allem Beziehungselend die Männer den überwiegenden Teil der Schuld tragen und sie es alleine sind, die ihr Verhalten ändern müssen.
Self Made Man kann dazu beitragen, die Diskussion über die Geschlechterrollen zu erweitern und aus der einen oder anderen Sackgasse herauszuholen.
Zur Systematik der Untersuchung muss natürlich hinterfragt werden, ob Frauen, die per Internet einen neuen Partner suchen und Frauen, die in der Bar angeflirtet werden, ein repräsentatives Ensemble darstellen.
0Kommentar|9 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 28. Februar 2009
Ich habe mich von einer Buchkritik dazu verleiten lassen, dieses Buch zu kaufen. Vom Thema her wäre der Inhalt eigentlich sehr interessant. Schon bald musste ich beim Lesen aber feststellen, dass hier jemand weniger sein Objekt als sich selber im Vordergrund sieht. Die Selbstdarstellung von Norah Vincent fand ich schnell mühsam. Die eigene Darstellung, lesbisch zu sein, hat keineswegs dazu geführt, dass man ihrem Mut applaudieren mochte, sondern ist einem eher ziemlich selbstverliebt vorgekommen. Ich rate vom Kauf dieses Buches ab. Ich meinerseits habe es nach 2/3 zur Seite gelegt, etwas, dass ich sehr selten mache.
0Kommentar|2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 19. November 2007
ich dachte das wird mal wieder was interessantes aber erst mal die stimme von der frau ist schon sehr anstrengend und zu viel Details uninteressante Details werden erzählt so das ich immer wieder schnell abgelenkt war und das Tongerät ausgeschaltet hab oder eingeschlafen bin !
Nein diese buch ist kein Geheimtipp es ist langweilig
0Kommentar|Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

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