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Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Thinking and Organizational Tools for Large-Scale Scrum [Kindle Edition]

Craig Larman , Bas Vodde
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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

Lean Development and Agile Methods for Large-Scale Products: Key Thinking and Organizational Tools for Sustainable Competitive Success

 

Increasingly, large product-development organizations are turning to lean thinking, agile principles and practices, and large-scale Scrum to sustainably and quickly deliver value and innovation. However, many groups have floundered in their practice-oriented adoptions. Why? Because without a deeper understanding of the thinking tools and profound organizational redesign needed, it is as though casting seeds on to an infertile field. Now, drawing on their long experience leading and guiding large-scale lean and agile adoptions for large, multisite, and offshore product development, and drawing on the best research for great team-based agile organizations, internationally recognized consultant and best-selling author Craig Larman and former leader of the agile transformation at Nokia Networks Bas Vodde share the key thinking and organizational tools needed to plant the seeds of product development success in a fertile lean and agile enterprise.

 

Coverage includes  

  • Lean thinking and development combined with agile practices and methods
  • Systems thinking
  • Queuing theory and large-scale development processes
  • Moving from single-function and component teams to stable cross-functional cross-component Scrum feature teams with end-to-end responsibility for features
  • Organizational redesign to a lean and agile enterprise that delivers value fast
  • Large-scale Scrum for multi-hundred-person product groups

In a competitive environment that demands ever-faster cycle times and greater innovation, applied lean thinking and agile principles are becoming an urgent priority. Scaling Lean & Agile Development will help leaders create the foundation for their lean enterprise—and deliver on the significant benefits of agility.

 

In addition to the foundation tools in this text, see the companion book Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Large, Multisite, and Offshore Product Development with Large-Scale Scrum for complementary action tools.

Synopsis

Lean Development and Agile Methods for Large-Scale Products: Key Thinking and Organizational Tools for Sustainable Competitive Success Increasingly, large product-development organizations are turning to lean thinking, agile principles and practices, and large-scale Scrum to sustainably and quickly deliver value and innovation. However, many groups have floundered in their practice-oriented adoptions. Why? Because without a deeper understanding of the thinking tools and profound organizational redesign needed, it is as though casting seeds on to an infertile field. Now, drawing on their long experience leading and guiding large-scale lean and agile adoptions for large, multisite, and offshore product development, and drawing on the best research for great team-based agile organizations, internationally recognized consultant and best-selling author Craig Larman and former leader of the agile transformation at Nokia Networks Bas Vodde share the key thinking and organizational tools needed to plant the seeds of product development success in a fertile lean and agile enterprise.Coverage includes *Lean thinking and development combined with agile practices and methods*Systems thinking*Queuing theory and large-scale development processes*Moving from single-function and component teams to stable cross-functional cross-component Scrum feature teams with end-to-end responsibility for features *Organizational redesign to a lean and agile enterprise that delivers value fast*Large-scale Scrum for multi-hundred-person product groups In a competitive environment that demands ever-faster cycle times and greater innovation, applied lean thinking and agile principles are becoming an urgent priority.

Scaling Lean & Agile Development will help leaders create the foundation for their lean enterprise--and deliver on the significant benefits of agility. In addition to the foundation tools in this text, see the companion book Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Large, Multisite, and Offshore Product Development with Large-Scale Scrum for complementary action tools.


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5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
Listening to Bas Vodde's speech about "the trouble with component teams" at the Stockholm Scrum Gathering 2008, I was amazed. From the participants' reactions, you could easily hear and see when someone recognized his or her own project: The troubles he described seemed too familiar. Yet most real big software development organization seems to be facing them, even on their way to getting agile, if the development teams are still organized according to architectural components. He also could explain with a really practical background why and how these problems would be solved by having agile cross-functional feature teams. These insights can be found with much more detail in the "Feature Teams" chapter of this wonderful book.

Craig Larman and Bas Vodde have put together lots of valuable background information on lean thinking applied to software projects. The book describes how agility is based in the Toyota values and principles, as well as in systems thinking and queuing theory. But it is far away from being a theoretical book, since it contains lots of practical experiences from the authors and other people introducing Scrum into large organizations. A big emphasis is on understanding that the pillars of lean are "Respect for people" and "Continuous improvement" and that the lean principles and the methods with which they are supported will not work alone, without the rest of the framework. As well as you cannot "do agile" but only "be agile". These are things frequently misunderstood, especially in large companies. Suddenly you are invited to dozens of daily "Scrum" standup meetings held by managers who have heard that daily standups make you agile.

A chapter I particularly like is the "Organization" chapter. How can you form an organization around agile development teams?
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Lean Agile Enterprise ALIVE! 13. Juni 2014
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Ich habe schon sehr viele Bücher iin diesem Umfeld gelesen und bin sehr spät auf das Buch von Craig Larman gestossen. Es ist sicherlich das BESTE Buch, wenn man nach Tips und Ratschläge sucht. Seine Vorschläge sind nach 'try this ...' / 'avoid this ...' extrem gut geordnet. Wer in diesem Umfeld arbeitet, findet viele hilfreiche Gedanken. Wichtig ist allerdings, dass es kein 'silver bullet' gibt - try it / avoid it / learn about it ...
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18 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Be Agile/Lean Rather Than Do Agile/Lean 25. Februar 2009
Von Methods & Tools Software Development Magazine - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is a classic example of the fact that it is better to teach somebody to fish than to give him fish. It emphasizes that it is important to "be agile" more than to "do agile". Approaches like Scrum or Lean are more frameworks to think about continuous improvement than tools that should be applied blindly like cooking recipes. The book will therefore tell you that "large-scale Scrum is Scrum" or that lean is not just kanban or waste reduction. The first part of the book is focused on thinking tools (systems thinking, lean thinking, queueing theory) that are presented with software project management related examples. Those who are looking for practical advice should not believe that the book remains only at the conceptual level. The authors distill many "try..." and "avoid..." recommendations that will help you implement agile and lean ideas in your organization. The second part of the book is devoted to organizational tools and the final chapter proposes frameworks to adapt Scrum to larger contexts.

This book is a must for those who believe that software development project management goes beyond the simple application of "silver bullet" recipes. It is a rich source of both thinking and practical content that is well suited for non-linear reading. A very good "Scrum primer" chapter at the end of the book will provide an introduction for those who are not familiar with this approach and a large number of "recommended readings" items will allow readers to explore more in details each concept.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen You need to read this book if you want to do a successful agile transition 3. März 2009
Von Andrea Heck - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Listening to Bas Vodde's speech about "the trouble with component teams" at the Stockholm Scrum Gathering 2008, I was amazed. From the participants' reactions, you could easily hear and see when someone recognized his or her own project: The troubles he described seemed too familiar. Yet most real big software development organization seems to be facing them, even on their way to getting agile, if the development teams are still organized according to architectural components. He also could explain with a really practical background why and how these problems would be solved by having agile cross-functional feature teams. These insights can be found with much more detail in the "Feature Teams" chapter of this wonderful book.

Craig Larman and Bas Vodde have put together lots of valuable background information on lean thinking applied to software projects. The book describes how agility is based in the Toyota values and principles, as well as in systems thinking and queuing theory. But it is far away from being a theoretical book, since it contains lots of practical experiences from the authors and other people introducing Scrum into large organizations. A big emphasis is on understanding that the pillars of lean are "Respect for people" and "Continuous improvement" and that the lean principles and the methods with which they are supported will not work alone, without the rest of the framework. As well as you cannot "do agile" but only "be agile". These are things frequently misunderstood, especially in large companies. Suddenly you are invited to dozens of daily "Scrum" standup meetings held by managers who have heard that daily standups make you agile.

A chapter I particularly like is the "Organization" chapter. How can you form an organization around agile development teams? How should the product development organization above the teams be? What needs to be changed in the other departments? What happens to phases and milestones? How will the HR strategies be adapted, how will budgeting work? - Very valuable also the top ten organizational impediments they and other agile development experts found, e.g. "considering learning a waste of time and money". You do not get all the answers, yet many, and the right questions.

In few words: A lot of helpful insights and tools that you estimate if you want to do a successful agile transition. Lots of thanks to Bas and Craig! - I am looking forward to the announced companion book "Practices for Scaling Lean and Agile".
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great tools for those adopting agile on large teams 5. Juni 2009
Von Ade Miller - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
While supposedly on vacation and sitting on a beach in Jamaica I finally got around to reading a couple of books that haven't quite made it to the top of the stack. This is largely thanks to the lack of slack and impending annual performance reviews. More on that later...

In the meantime what of Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Thinking and Organizational Tools for Large-Scale Scrum?

It turns out this wasn't quite what I was expecting. Which, in this case, is a good thing. Much of the nuts and bolts of large-scale development will be covered in an--as yet unpublished--companion volume; "Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Large, Multisite and Offshore Product Development with Large-Scale Scrum".

Why is this a good thing? Well, the second volume will focus on the nuts and bolts and the temptation would for many potential readers--myself included--to skip the theory and go straight to the applied. A bad idea when the central theme of the first volume is that large-scale agile adoption has effects throughout the organization. The development team and day-to-day development activities are just the tip of the iceberg.

The first section of the book focuses on thinking tools; Systems Thinking, Lean Thinking, Queueing Theory. Which is typical of the book's approach of giving the readers the tools to "Be agile rather than do agile". This makes a lot of sense. Large organizations are complex and unique, attempting to author a one size fits all recipe for agile adoption would seem unwise. But if you're expecting a book containing a prescriptive set of recipes then you'll be disappointed.

The second section covers the organizational tools starting off with Feature Teams and the inherent problems with component teams. The discussion expands to cover many other topics; building teams in place of managing resource pools, rewarding teams as opposed to individuals, a Beyond Budgets approach rather than a conventional annual budgeting approach. All these come into play when managing large scale organizational change to a more agile approach.

It's only in the last chapter that the authors put it all together and discuss two example Scrum Frameworks for large organizations. They also go to great lengths not to be prescriptive with "Try..." and "Avoid..." sections replacing "Do..." and "Don't...". Much of the details will be covered in the companion book.

There's a lot of material presented here and it leaves the reader with the somewhat daunting task of figuring out how to turn their organization inside out. Especially when considering something the size of Microsoft's Developer Division (of which p&p is part). There are some possible reasons for this:

There's an inflection point at some size/complexity scale where this approach breaks down.
Visual Studio's huge legacy, architecture, code base and long established engineering culture needs more change than I can imagine in order to map it onto the full Feature Team approach they describe (I'm not very imaginative).
The road from were we are today and the approach Bas and Craig describe is longer than I'm prepared to accept.
In some respects much of what we tried to do in Visual Studio Tools for Office 2008 maps onto their Product, Product Area and Feature Teams approach and we had moderate successes. I'll be giving my well-thumbed to various people in the Division's engineering team and see what they think. It's full of good ideas and definitely worth reading I'm waiting for volume 2.

Read more about distributed and large scale agile on my blog: [...]
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Extremely thorough 24. März 2009
Von Lasse Koskela - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
"Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Thinking and Organizational Tools for Large-Scale Scrum" is the first of two books co-authored by the same duo. This first volume covers the underlying theory needed for understanding the dynamics of scaling agile development to large organizations, including one of the best introductions to Systems Thinking that I remember reading.

Indeed, the first part of this book is all about thinking tools such as Systems Thinking, Lean Thinking, and Queuing Theory. Throughout the book, the authors refer back to these theories when they try to illuminate the "what" and "why" of various dynamics.

The second part focuses more concretely on how to scale a product development organization. It starts with a thorough, seminal chapter on Feature Teams and continues with more general discussion of what makes teams work. True to their style of writing, these chapters are full of references to related research. Knowing the authors, I expected nothing less. After team work, the authors move on to discussing a scaling technique called "Requirement Areas", specialization, organizational impediments, even budgeting and HR.

The third and last part of the book is essentially an appendix containing the "Scrum Primer" by Gabrielle Benefield and Pete Deemer. Personally, I think this appendix could've been left out, considering that most readers should already be familiar with Scrum.

Again, this book is perhaps the most thoroughly researched text on agile development I've read (and I've read most of them) and the authors clearly know what they're talking about. Having said that, it is also quite a heavy read considering that it's only some 300+ pages. I read it in one day, barely leaving the couch but I can imagine that others might not enjoy the theory-heavy approach as much.

With that said, while it's not full of the kind of concrete tips we'd like to see, this book does offer a strong foundation for understanding how to scale and how not to scale up organizations for agile development. I highly recommend it to leaders, change agents and agile coaches involved in large-scale transitions.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Be Agile for Competitive advantage in Business 18. Juli 2010
Von Shanmugam Annapoorani - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is one of the best books available for Large Scale Agile Adoption and Development. I had read this book about a year ago. Now with some coaching and practise, I am able to understand and appreciate the contents better. The authors covers the Large Scale Scrum development in 3 parts - Systems thinking, Organisation redesign and practices.

In Systems thinking the authors discuss tools like systems dynamics, mental model awareness, lean thinking, queuing theory. People who learn and apply these various thinking tools will be clear that existing organisational design inhibits flow of value -> leading to pressure of its re-design. Then it provides some tips for organisation redesign like feature teams, requirement areas and changes which could be done in organsiation policies wrt structure, process, task, people and rewards. The action tools and practices to help the product group get going on large, multisite and offshore agile development is available in the companion book. My review comments on the same can be seen in [...].

With volumes of experience in agile, the authors talks about how agile is adopted by organisation in reality. The practices will be adopted first and eventually the system and organisation will be looked into. First people think scrum as a developer practise - grow product in small manageable steps, with learning and corrective actions towards goal. Then they would discover effective use of action tools is dependent on organisation re-design. Organisation re-design to support lean and agile development will not happen without increased scrutiny of traditional assumptions, increased transparency and repeated re-examination of the structure and policies that define and surround the product development. The book clearly dissects some assumptions and policies in traditional organisations that inhibit flow of value and effective teams.

It beautifully analyses the dynamics behind why software tend to degrade over years and proves the 5th discipline law faster is slower and thereby substantiate the very basic point 'why the team needs to own their work'. Teams improves the process if they feel they own it. When there is no ownership people "just do their job" follow the process and a huge potential in performance and job satisfaction is lost. The motivation parameters listed in the book like, working in a challenging environment with peers who are doing the challenging, adding value, meaningful work, learning, achievement and personal growth, is quite insightful.

I liked the metaphor of lake and rock effect. In scrum bigger issues (rocks) are visible at first. Through repetition of inspect and adapt cycle, i.e when water level is lowered, the smaller issues (more and more rocks) become visible. First bigger issues like insuffice testing, integrn and poor collboration hidden within long cycle are solved with short cycle, as these inefficient practices become visible suddenly. There arises strong pressure to constantly improve and revolutionize, manual to automated testing, result in high utilisation rates.
The book suggests to handle risky features first and later says ambiguous stories increases variability and recommends not to choose it for development. I found it quite contradicting.

Would have liked some insights and references on other essential parts of product development like offshore agile development, hardware development when linked to s/w, changes needed in sales and marketing, deploy and delivery and field support. Special tips for the change agents would have been more helpful, though it has been mentioned in a couple of places, as the entire journey of Agile Transformation is a roller coaster ride of emotions.
Looks like the book is written so that each chapter can be read independantly. But for a person who is reading continuously it is overdose of lean, queuing theory, feature teams, large scrums ... I would have liked this book to have been organised and written in a less complex and easy to read style. Just like in reality of adopting scrum, while reading the book, the action tools is the easiest to read and then the organisation and system thinking chapters.

There are a lot of subtle message written with humour slyly and because of the volume of text has the risk of being unnoticed. The ones I noticed are (which I din't in my first read) are 'No practice, policy or process is sacred - go challenge everything', 'Shu Ha Ri progressive learning discussed in martial arts', 'shared responibility induces pressure to keep code clean', 'design is code, architecture is in code' and not in documents, 'planning is continuous and inclusive process and not top down annual event', 'Avoid job description - time and energy spent on defining job description significantly contribute to heat death of the universe'. 'Wonder if person who does the job ever reads the job description list', 'identity is in being part of a product and not being a specialist with narrow skill', 'Big and slow org -> big and slow s/w', 'Effective teams work like startup - whatever role available is taken, leadership rotates ...', 'evaluate the hard and soft facts, look for patterns, gleam insights, prioritize and then decide what to do', 'harness intellect of sordinary people', 'patience through the awkward learning phase and not abandoning new techniques quickly', , 'earlier you fall behind schedule, the more time you will get to catch up'.

This is a very thoughtful book written by well-experienced authors to serve as a practical guide for organisations which adopt scrum. The highlight of the book is the introduction of causal loop diagrams which is a great tool to depict Systems dynamics and the use of Try and Avoid experiments as it provides insightful practical tips which can be adapted according to context, in different organisation independent of its size and complexity. The impediment list given in the Organisation chapter is a cook book which can be found in almost any organisation. The references at the end of every chapter with explanation on what relevant inputs can be found in those, are quite extensive and unique. The book itself is written in a collaborative style and throughout the book all concepts are explained as 'we' and written in an unconventional style including diagrams like bee and flower. The summary at the end of the chapters are quite good. On the whole it is definitely a good reference guide for organisations adopting scrum.
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