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Roman Warfare (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 16. Mai 2007


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 240 Seiten
  • Verlag: Phoenix Press; Auflage: New Ed (16. Mai 2007)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 075382258X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753822586
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 19,8 x 13,6 x 1,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 211.851 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Synopsis

When Alexander the Great carved out his empire, Rome was just one of many city states on the Italian peninsula. Yet it conquered its neighbours one-by-one, defeated Carthage and eventually overwhelmed the Greek successor states too. As its republican institutions gave way to Imperial rule by Augustus and his heirs, the Roman Empire extended from the French Atlantic coast to Syria. Later conquests included Britain and much of modern Romania. How did Rome overcome opponent after opponent? What was the grand strategy of the Roman Empire? Adrian Goldsworthy reveals why Rome developed the most professional fighting force of the ancient world and what it was like to be a soldier in the legions.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Adrian Goldsworthy has a doctorate from Oxford University. His books have sold more than a quarter of a million copies and been translated into more than a dozen languages. A full-time author, he regularly contributes to TV documentaries on Roman themes and has lectured on Roman history in both the UK and USA. http://www.adriangoldsworthy.com/

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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von James J. Bloom am 31. Mai 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is not the definitive history of Rome's wars, but a well-constructed survey of how it prepared, equipped, manned and made war, using selected illustrative examples from each stage of development over the thousand-year period.
Goldsworthy sets his task as tracing the development of warfare within the context of the evolution of the army and state: the nature of the army, why and with what objectives if fought a war, and the way in which it operated, taking into consideration the military institutions of the main enemies in each era. Matters such as arms,armor and equipment are handled succinctly by use of drawings and diagrams, which are especially good at depicting battle tactics for the major encounters. The positions of troops are shown as if from an aerial view rather than the bare schematic bars and squares usually shown.
Despite being touted as a general, introductory text, there is plenty to keep the knowledgeable reader interested as well. I found new insights in every chapter, which follow a chronological rather than topical arrangement.
Being pitched at the general reader, as is required by Cassell's _History of Warfare_ series, the book is heavily illustrated. This has its good and bad features. Mostly, the illustration are taken from columns, gravemarkers, monuments and ruins of forts. They are usually provided with detailed captions to explain the significance of the features shown therein. My only complaint is that some of the pictures occupy a full-page or two-page spread where a smaller image would have sufficed. I expect this is due to the publisher's required text-to-illustration ratio.
Here is an example of Goldsworthy's exposition, taken from his section on Caesar in Gaul.
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Format: Taschenbuch
This book is all about the history of Roman warfare. It is spanning the time period from the very beginning of the Roman Republic till the fall of the Empire, almost a thousand years later.
What is the explanation for the big success and the longevity of the successes of the Romans? What seemed to be the clue to success at the start turned out to be everlasting: First of all the total dedication to the task of destroying the opponent without any compromises, on the other side the lack of ongoing sentiments towards the once defeated which included the absorption of them, shown very clearly also in the fact that they used auxiliary forces. It went even so far that non- italian generals became emperors ("Turn the enemy of today into the Roman soldier of tomorrow").
All the capacity of the Empire was mobilized to serve the military. It was a military state. The Romans acquired the best weaponry, they had a well organized logistic support (which alone can stand for winning wars!), they had the most effective training which became over the years a highly professional affair and what was most decisive, they had the best tactics in uniform with a functioning discipline. And not least: "The Roman military system was characterized by its flexibility." Flexibility being a skill that later showed to be so decisive in Napoleons victories and the German "Blitzkrieg" troops (interestingly both Napoleon and the Nazis used old Roman symbols).
In fact there is almost nothing in modern armies of today that had not a forerunner and model in the Roman army (drill and clearly defined unit organization and command structure).
It were the Roman armies who laid the foundations of modern Europe more than Roman laws and education or whatever Latin input. Roman politics and warfare was closely connected.
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3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von John F Murphy Jr am 10. Mai 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
The field of Roman warfare is an area of interest that has attracted widespread fascination from the time of the Roman Caesars themselves. Many of the surviving representations of Roman art, such as the Arch of Titus and the Column of Trajan, show us Roman legionaries like those commanded by General Maximus (Russel Crowe) in the new Ridley Scott/Dreamworks' epic "Gladiator!" Adrian Goldsworthy's superb book Roman Warfare could not come at a better time, since the field of historical reenactment of the time of the Roman legions is more popular than ever. In England, where the outdoor battle scenes of the "Gladiator" movie were filmed, reenactment groups like the Ermine Street Guard have raised the art of historical reenactment to true perfection. Many of the extras in the movie "Gladiator" probably came from these British reenactment groups! Coming out now from Cassell, a British publishing house with a firm reputation in military publishing, Adrian Goldsworthy's Roman Warfare is a welcome addition to the growing field of Roman military history. With the new information continually coming to light about the brave Roman legions from archaeologic excavations at historical sites in England and in Europe, Goldsworthy's book is an essential addition to the book shelf of anyone interested in the Roman legions which wrote so much of European history. Roman Warfare clearly focuses on all the aspects of the Roman war machine, which for centuries ruled the battle fields from Hadrian's Wall in England to the frontier of the Danube River and the deserts of the Middle East and North Africa.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Amazon.com: 30 Rezensionen
126 von 127 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Great Intro and Overview of the Roman Art of War 31. Mai 2000
Von James J. Bloom - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This book is not the definitive history of Rome's wars, but a well-constructed survey of how it prepared, equipped, manned and made war, using selected illustrative examples from each stage of development over the thousand-year period.
Goldsworthy sets his task as tracing the development of warfare within the context of the evolution of the army and state: the nature of the army, why and with what objectives if fought a war, and the way in which it operated, taking into consideration the military institutions of the main enemies in each era. Matters such as arms,armor and equipment are handled succinctly by use of drawings and diagrams, which are especially good at depicting battle tactics for the major encounters. The positions of troops are shown as if from an aerial view rather than the bare schematic bars and squares usually shown.
Despite being touted as a general, introductory text, there is plenty to keep the knowledgeable reader interested as well. I found new insights in every chapter, which follow a chronological rather than topical arrangement.
Being pitched at the general reader, as is required by Cassell's _History of Warfare_ series, the book is heavily illustrated. This has its good and bad features. Mostly, the illustration are taken from columns, gravemarkers, monuments and ruins of forts. They are usually provided with detailed captions to explain the significance of the features shown therein. My only complaint is that some of the pictures occupy a full-page or two-page spread where a smaller image would have sufficed. I expect this is due to the publisher's required text-to-illustration ratio.
Here is an example of Goldsworthy's exposition, taken from his section on Caesar in Gaul. After a brief excerpt from Julius Caesar's _Bellum Gallicum_, describing the battle at Sambre in 57 BC, Goldsworthy remarks:
"It is worth noting that Caesar, although he had moved into the front line, does not bother to tell us whether or not he actuallt fought hand-to-hand. What he does stress is that he exposed himself to danger in order more effectively to do his job of encouraging the battle line. The general's job was to lead and control his army, not inspire them with his personal prowess, like the warrior aristocrats of early Rome or Alexander the Great who consciously emulated the behavior of Homeric heroes."
The book is filled with such helpful commentary.
Every epoch (including that of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus, of _Gladiator_ fame) is depicted, showing how the financial and political policies of the emperors and senate affected the abilities of the armies to do what was expected.
A detailed chronology, a glossary that actually explains rather than merely annotates terms, a brief review of the ancient sources for each chapter, mini biographies of each of the luminaries, and a well thought out reading list for each chapter all add to the books usefulness.
Highly recommended both as a "first book" for novices and a handy references for old hands.
28 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A Good Overview of the Roman Army's Political Evolution 15. März 2005
Von Octavius - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Unlike other armies in antiquity, the Roman army evolved to be a formal institution with a distinctive military code, standard equipment, defined ranks and duties, as well as laws and procedures affecting the life and retirement of its soldiers. Although service was long (20 years/no family allowed) and discipline was strict (i.e. decimation), it was truly the first modern professional army with very specialized units ranging from doctors and cooks to sappers and siege engineers. Its men were led by leaders such as Lucullus, Pompey, and Caesar who took war as a precise implementation of massive and usually unrestricted force towards a defined political ends. Despite its defeats, the Roman army's training, efficiency and tenacity allowed it to overcome superior numbers of often disorganized tribal or despotic mercenary armies of Celtic tribes or Greeks even under higher attrition. It made Rome the master of the Mediterranean world and most of modern Europe for over 1500 years (counting the Byzantine.)

Adrian Goldsworthy's book on Roman warfare is a decent text covering the evolution of the Roman army from the Early Republic to the Empire but is primarily illustrative. The text tries to study the evolution of the Roman army from the perspective of three disciplines: historical, political,and sociological. It generally covers its projection from the origins as aristorcratic clans and retainers raiding cattle from nearby Veii to the Imperial war machine that would for so long ruthlessly crush any threat or resistance to its conquest. The problem with the text seems to be in what discipline it focuses on to explain a certain evolutionary aspect of the army: the juxtapositions are awkward and/or fail to reinforce the main purpose of the text in clarifying the evolution. More specific details about the Roman legionary life could have been added for example and, in other places, more detail on the political changes would have been more instructive. Again the book's emphasis is more on the political evolution of the army as opposed to a strict categorization of army units and equipment and how they each evolved over the course of time. The book is a sociological summary of the Roman army: how it affected the political process and vis versa.

The book is primarily illustrative and therefore has great pictures, maps, and charts, but it doesn't have much depth in its summaries. The book presents good introductory material on Roman warfare but is general in its content. The information is presented more as a summary and the main value in the book is in its maps and diagrams which seem to be more illustrative on the subject matter than the text itself. Don't let that dissuade you though: the summaries are decent and the hardbound book is good for looking at its maps or photos making it a great addition to your bookshelf. However, for a complete categorical summary description of structure, units, armor, and armaments covering the Roman Empire, I would recommend Goldworthy's "The Complete Roman Army" which is more comprehensive on these precise topics as well as more categorical in the division and chronology of these topics. A book on the political evolution of the Roman army as attempted here is something that requires more textual analysis than illustration as it is more abstract of a subject and so I would also recommend G.R. Watson's 'The Roman Soldier' as a companion to this book as it explains the Roman army more from the perspective of the individual soldier as opposed to Rome's political institutions.
24 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Best brief guide to Roman warfare available 11. Juni 2006
Von Jordan M. Poss - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Adrian Goldsworthy's short guide, Roman Warfare, is easily the best book of its length that I have read. If you're looking for a concise yet detailed survey of Roman military history, this is the book to buy.

Goldsworthy cuts the fat from the subject, stripping away the mundane details that typically bog down the casual reader or armchair historian. He charts the development of the Roman army from its earliest forms through the end of the empire, relying on impeccable research and a very clear style. He clears up a lot of confusing ideas (such as the composition of the republican-era triplex acies formation) and, unusual for an historian dealing with figures like Caesar, Scipio, and Hannibal, he never indulges in hero-worship (something which, sadly, cannot be said of the otherwise excellent historians Theodore Dodge and B.H. Liddell-Hart).

Another thing that makes this book worthwhile is the copious amount of maps and illustrations, all of which support the text in a clear and easy to understand manner.

If you enjoy this book and would like something a bit deeper, I'd also recommend Goldsworthy's The Fall of Carthage, a very good history of the three Punic Wars.

Roman Warfare is highly recommended reading for anyone new to Roman military history or history in general.
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The major points of Roman Military History 26. März 2006
Von Michael Valdivielso - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Roman Warfare by Adrian Goldsworthy is a very detailed book. Starting with the founding of Rome, the conquest of Italy and the early Republic, the author gives us a great foundation for the rest of the book. We get a very complete chronology and each chapter gives us the major points of the military history of Rome, from equipment, to tactics, to where they got their recruits, to how they treated their enemies. By the time we get to the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West and the recovery, for a short period, in the East we learn that the Roman Army, if given the men and funding, was always victorious in the end. The Army did not fail the Empire, the Empire failed the Army.

With a glossary on terms, appendices with lots of information and great maps detailing some of the important battles and wars, this is a great book for its size. A must for any library on Roman history or military history.
30 von 37 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
AVE CAESAR! HAIL CAESAR! 10. Mai 2000
Von John F Murphy Jr - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
The field of Roman warfare is an area of interest that has attracted widespread fascination from the time of the Roman Caesars themselves. Many of the surviving representations of Roman art, such as the Arch of Titus and the Column of Trajan, show us Roman legionaries like those commanded by General Maximus (Russel Crowe) in the new Ridley Scott/Dreamworks' epic "Gladiator!" Adrian Goldsworthy's superb book Roman Warfare could not come at a better time, since the field of historical reenactment of the time of the Roman legions is more popular than ever. In England, where the outdoor battle scenes of the "Gladiator" movie were filmed, reenactment groups like the Ermine Street Guard have raised the art of historical reenactment to true perfection. Many of the extras in the movie "Gladiator" probably came from these British reenactment groups! Coming out now from Cassell, a British publishing house with a firm reputation in military publishing, Adrian Goldsworthy's Roman Warfare is a welcome addition to the growing field of Roman military history. With the new information continually coming to light about the brave Roman legions from archaeologic excavations at historical sites in England and in Europe, Goldsworthy's book is an essential addition to the book shelf of anyone interested in the Roman legions which wrote so much of European history. Roman Warfare clearly focuses on all the aspects of the Roman war machine, which for centuries ruled the battle fields from Hadrian's Wall in England to the frontier of the Danube River and the deserts of the Middle East and North Africa. Close attention is paid to the many campaigns of the Roman Army--featuring great generals like Julius Caesar--as well as to a clear explanation of the organization of the army which made the legions of Rome supreme against any adversaries. Joining a clear text with well-chosen illustrations, a combined operation of real sophistication, the book is a welcome find for any scholar and a fine introduction to anyone inspired by the "Gladiator" movie to learn more about the soldiers of General Maximus. Goldsworthy's book comes packed with much information that will lead to rewarding further study of this exciting subject. As the Roman legionaries would say themselves, "Ave Caesar!" "Hail Caesar!"
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