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The Road (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Cormac McCarthy
4.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (48 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 2,68 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

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Kindle Edition EUR 2,68  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 16,88  
Taschenbuch EUR 6,10  
Hörbuch-Download, Gekürzte Ausgabe EUR 8,70 oder EUR 0,00 im Probeabo von Audible.de
Audio CD, Gekürzte Ausgabe, Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 16,99  


Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Best known for his Border Trilogy, hailed in the San Francisco Chronicle as "an American classic to stand with the finest literary achievements of the century," Cormac McCarthy has written ten rich and often brutal novels, including the bestselling No Country for Old Men, and The Road. Profoundly dark, told in spare, searing prose, The Road is a post-apocalyptic masterpiece, one of the best books we've read this year, but in case you need a second (and expert) opinion, we asked Dennis Lehane, author of equally rich, occasionally bleak and brutal novels, to read it and give us his take. Read his glowing review below. --Daphne Durham


Guest Reviewer: Dennis Lehane

Dennis Lehane, master of the hard-boiled thriller, generated a cult following with his series about private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro, wowed readers with the intense and gut-wrenching Mystic River, blew fans all away with the mind-bending Shutter Island, and switches gears with Coronado, his new collection of gritty short stories (and one play).

Cormac McCarthy sets his new novel, The Road, in a post-apocalyptic blight of gray skies that drizzle ash, a world in which all matter of wildlife is extinct, starvation is not only prevalent but nearly all-encompassing, and marauding bands of cannibals roam the environment with pieces of human flesh stuck between their teeth. If this sounds oppressive and dispiriting, it is. McCarthy may have just set to paper the definitive vision of the world after nuclear war, and in this recent age of relentless saber-rattling by the global powers, it's not much of a leap to feel his vision could be not far off the mark nor, sadly, right around the corner. Stealing across this horrific (and that's the only word for it) landscape are an unnamed man and his emaciated son, a boy probably around the age of ten. It is the love the father feels for his son, a love as deep and acute as his grief, that could surprise readers of McCarthy's previous work. McCarthy's Gnostic impressions of mankind have left very little place for love. In fact that greatest love affair in any of his novels, I would argue, occurs between the Billy Parham and the wolf in The Crossing. But here the love of a desperate father for his sickly son transcends all else. McCarthy has always written about the battle between light and darkness; the darkness usually comprises 99.9% of the world, while any illumination is the weak shaft thrown by a penlight running low on batteries. In The Road, those batteries are almost out--the entire world is, quite literally, dying--so the final affirmation of hope in the novel's closing pages is all the more shocking and maybe all the more enduring as the boy takes all of his father's (and McCarthy's) rage at the hopeless folly of man and lays it down, lifting up, in its place, the oddest of all things: faith. --Dennis Lehane



Amazon.com

Best known for his Border Trilogy, hailed in the San Francisco Chronicle as "an American classic to stand with the finest literary achievements of the century," Cormac McCarthy has written ten rich and often brutal novels, including the bestselling No Country for Old Men, and The Road. Profoundly dark, told in spare, searing prose, The Road is a post-apocalyptic masterpiece, one of the best books we've read this year, but in case you need a second (and expert) opinion, we asked Dennis Lehane, author of equally rich, occasionally bleak and brutal novels, to read it and give us his take. Read his glowing review below. --Daphne Durham


Guest Reviewer: Dennis Lehane

Dennis Lehane, master of the hard-boiled thriller, generated a cult following with his series about private investigators Patrick Kenzie and Angela Gennaro, wowed readers with the intense and gut-wrenching Mystic River, blew fans all away with the mind-bending Shutter Island, and switches gears with Coronado, his new collection of gritty short stories (and one play).

Cormac McCarthy sets his new novel, The Road, in a post-apocalyptic blight of gray skies that drizzle ash, a world in which all matter of wildlife is extinct, starvation is not only prevalent but nearly all-encompassing, and marauding bands of cannibals roam the environment with pieces of human flesh stuck between their teeth. If this sounds oppressive and dispiriting, it is. McCarthy may have just set to paper the definitive vision of the world after nuclear war, and in this recent age of relentless saber-rattling by the global powers, it's not much of a leap to feel his vision could be not far off the mark nor, sadly, right around the corner. Stealing across this horrific (and that's the only word for it) landscape are an unnamed man and his emaciated son, a boy probably around the age of ten. It is the love the father feels for his son, a love as deep and acute as his grief, that could surprise readers of McCarthy's previous work. McCarthy's Gnostic impressions of mankind have left very little place for love. In fact that greatest love affair in any of his novels, I would argue, occurs between the Billy Parham and the wolf in The Crossing. But here the love of a desperate father for his sickly son transcends all else. McCarthy has always written about the battle between light and darkness; the darkness usually comprises 99.9% of the world, while any illumination is the weak shaft thrown by a penlight running low on batteries. In The Road, those batteries are almost out--the entire world is, quite literally, dying--so the final affirmation of hope in the novel's closing pages is all the more shocking and maybe all the more enduring as the boy takes all of his father's (and McCarthy's) rage at the hopeless folly of man and lays it down, lifting up, in its place, the oddest of all things: faith. --Dennis Lehane




Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Cormac McCarthy wurde 1933 in Rhodes Island geboren und wuchs in Knoxville/Tennessee, auf. Für seine Bücher wurde er u. a. mit dem William Faulkner Award, dem American Academy Award, dem National Book Award und dem National Book Crities Circle Award ausgezeichnet. 2007 erhielt er für seinen epochalen Roman Die Straße den Pulitzerpreis. McCarthy lebt heute in El Paso, Texas. "Kein Land für alte Männer" wurde von den Coen-Brüdern fürs Kino verfilmt.

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15 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A road trip through hell 10. August 2007
Format:Taschenbuch
Cormac Mccarthy's The Road is a dark, post apocalyptic journey through the remnants of the world as we know it, with the faintest flicker of hope at the end.

Destroyed by some never quite explained catastrophe, the Earth has become nearly inhospitable to life. A thick ash smothers everything and hangs in the sky, making a cold, quiet moonscape where things had once been green and alive. Through this nightmare world travels bands of desperate survivors, including an unnamed man and his son. The father's plan is to travel south to warmth and the ocean, where he hopes to find their salvation. Along the way they are confronted by cannibals, thugs and others as adrift as they are, a Darwinian struggle reminiscent to some degree of the lost boys in The Lord of the Flies, but far more sinister and disturbing. In particular, the image of the captives of the cannibals- who are being eaten bit by bit, shrinking grotesquely but kept alive so their flesh remains fresh- is a vision of Hell right out of Hieronymus Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights. Calling themselves "the good guys," the father and son still carry a gun- with two bullets- to end their lives if needed rather than suffer a crueler fate. The father also struggles with the ethical dilemma of having to "unteach" his son about compassion and empathy, afraid that the boy- who wants to help those equally in need- will only die in the attempt. This "every man for himself" situation is in stark contrast to everything the father believes, and how the boy has been raised. It's this struggle to hang on to the noble aspects of humanity while surrounded by the worse that makes the novel insightful, haunting, and a riveting read.

Mark Wakely, author of An Audience for Einstein
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9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Man kann nicht alles reparieren 31. August 2011
Von Tabàro e baùta TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Ein grausiges Buch. Seit langer Zeit habe ich keines mehr so verschlungen wie dieses. Die Welt, die Personen, die Handlung, die Sprache: Alles ist aus Blei, verschwimmt ineinander und ist deprimierend trüb. Der Himmel und die Straße, einfarbig: Der Weg ist das Ziel, und man verfolgt als Leser den Mann und seinen Sohn, beide unbenannt, genauso wie das Schicksal, das die Erde heimgesucht hat. Es würde keinen Sinn machen, die Katastrophe zu erklären, der Überlebenskampf erlaubt dies nicht, jeden einzelnen Tag, gegen die Natur, die kannibalischen Mitmenschen und die innere Selbstaufgabe.

Ein mitreißendes Buch, das man kaum aus der Hand legen kann, mit einer in ihrer Monotonie grandiosen Sprache, und einer Atmosphäre, die man nicht so schnell vergisst. Gewiss kein Horror- oder Gruselbuch, sondern etwas viel düsteres.

Das Taschenbuch ist natürlich billigst auf den Preis getrimmt. Viel Weißraum und eine große Schriftart lassen die 300 Seiten unter den Fingern wegfließen wie nichts.

Für mich persönlich eines der besten Bücher der letzten 10 Jahre.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
"the road" is about the travel of a father and his little son in a totally wasted land, almost without food and clothes. basically they have just each other. it's a vision of a post-apocalyptic era, everything has been burnt down and destroyed, the sun isn't shining anymore - just ash all over the place. there are nearly no people left anymore and marauding bands of cannibals are moving around. it's very difficult to find something to eat, as flora and fauna is dead and all the houses and supermarkets have been plundered years ago. every meeting with the few other humans might likely to end with violent death. in this environment the father and his son try to survive day by day - moving on towards their goal to reach the sea.

the book is about despair, about the will to live, about the will to die and about the unconditional love of a father for his son. the experiences are described very intense, and the atmosphere is dark and cold. questions about good and bad arise as well as about responsibilities and necessities. does it make sense to survive in a dying world?
you won't regret reading this book.
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
In terms of its seeming simplicity, from other novels he has written. Dark, terrifying and powerful, this is one of the finest American novels in years. Its structure and muscular prose are so stark and well-crafted, this story picks you up, shakes you and won't let go even after you've read the final page. Also, if you missed Tino Georgiou's masterful novel--The Fates, go and read it.It is the first novel of the century that could rightly be called a masterpiece.
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8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
This outstanding work deals with a man and his son who are trying to survive in an America struck by some unnamed catastrophe of biblical proportions. Almost everybody has perished, the man's wife, traumatized by the events has commited suicide, fauna and flora are nearly extinguished and the chances of survival are minimal. The few remaining humans forage this barren world for food, and in the face of starvation resort to unspeakable forms of cannibalism (which is a recurrent motif in McCarthy's fiction). McCarthy portrays this infernal scenario in a beautifully spartanic and extremely dense language. The strength of this highly impressive novel lies in McCarthy's ability to convey his Christian and existentialist philosophy in a context devoid of unnecessarily detailed plot or complexity. The emotional impact of the developing father - son relationship against the backdrop of the father's deteriorating health are deeply moving and the final pages of the book bring the tears to your eyes. The intelligent father's almost scientific scepticism turns into misanthropic paranoia under the horrific circumstances and every meeting with other people becomes an extremely stressful event dominated by outbursts of violence. The son in his childlike innocence ponders a more cooperative approach to the situation, but he always follows his father as long as he is alive. Yet despite all the dark melancholia and senseless brutality the son finally finds a more promising way of dealing with the challenges of this nightmarish world: he joins a group of people trying to survive by way of supporting one another. It's not an all-male group either and therefore it seems to offer the theoretical opportunity of continuing the biological reproduction of the human race. Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Wahnsinnsbuch
Wer Lust hat, ein wenig an der Welt zu verzweifeln - dem empfehle ich dieses Buch. Wunderbar grau-braun traurig. Und deprimierend. Großartig geschrieben.
Vor 18 Tagen von dominikus veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Klassikerpotential
Ich empfehle es das Buch bei Sonnenschein zu lesen oder zumindest eingemummelt mit Tee vor einem prasselndem Kamin, denn das Buch wird Ihnen Gänsehaut bereiten. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 1 Monat von Sonja veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Buch wie ein Schwarzes Loch ...
Die Straße. Der Mann. Der Junge. Hunger. Kälte. Furcht. Misstrauen. Hunger. Kälte. Todesangst. Der Junge. Der Mann. Die Straße. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 3 Monaten von brudervomweber veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen eines der besten und schrecklichsten Bücher die ich je gelesen...
Es gibt Endzeit Geschichten die uns glauben machen wollen, dass alles irgendwie wieder ins Lot kommt und dann gibt es The Road. So echt und dabei so niederschmetternd.
Vor 3 Monaten von Al P. veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Can't put that book away ....
Very well written story. It is faszinating how one can describe a pretty monotonous voyage and still keep the suspense up. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 4 Monaten von P. Bauer veröffentlicht
3.0 von 5 Sternen 500 shades of gray
Meinem Filmgeschmack geschuldet ,bin ich über den gleichnamigen Film auf das Buch gestoßen. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 4 Monaten von B. Jordans veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein Albtraum
Namen spielen keine Rolle mehr, keiner fragt nach dem Was und Warum der Katastrophe, nur immer weitergehen, nicht an einem Ort bleiben, das Kind muss überleben, nur nicht... Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 5 Monaten von Claus veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen deprimierend und schön - schön deprimierend
Glaubwürdig, realistisch, grausam und ehrlich. Ein unglaublich stimmungsvolles Buch. Es gibt in dieser Welt eigentlich keine Hoffnung und Liebe mehr, aber ein Vater schafft es... Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 6 Monaten von A. Maisel veröffentlicht
4.0 von 5 Sternen I recommend it to everyone who is not faint-hearted
''The Road'' was written by Cormac McCarthy is about a father and his son, who try to survive in a post-apocalyptic America. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 8 Monaten von Raphael Brugger veröffentlicht
4.0 von 5 Sternen Eine graue Welt
"The Road" ist die Geschichte eines Vaters und eines Sohnes, die gemeinsam auf dem Weg durch eine zerstörte Welt sind. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 10 Monaten von Villette veröffentlicht
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