An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.
Rich Dad Poor Dad (English Edition)
 
Größeres Bild
 

Rich Dad Poor Dad (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Robert T. Kiyosaki
4.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (271 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 5,51 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

‹  Zurück zur Artikelübersicht

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Personal-finance author and lecturer Robert Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective through exposure to a pair of disparate influences: his own highly educated but fiscally unstable father, and the multimillionaire eighth-grade dropout father of his closest friend. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" (whose weekly paychecks, while respectable, were never quite sufficient to meet family needs) pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad" (that "the poor and the middle class work for money," but "the rich have money work for them"). Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. Rich Dad, Poor Dad, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his the philosophy behind his relationship with money. Although Kiyosaki can take a frustratingly long time to make his points, his book nonetheless compellingly advocates for the type of "financial literacy" that's never taught in schools. Based on the principle that income-generating assets always provide healthier bottom-line results than even the best of traditional jobs, it explains how those assets might be acquired so that the jobs can eventually be shed. --Howard Rothman

Amazon.co.uk

Personal finance author and lecturer Robert Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective through exposure to a pair of disparate influences: his own highly educated, but fiscally unstable father, and the multimillionaire eighth-grade dropout father of his closest friend. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" (whose weekly paychecks, while respectable, were never quite sufficient to meet family needs) pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad" (that "the poor and the middle class work for money," but "the rich have money work for them"). Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. Rich Dad Poor Dad, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his the philosophy behind his relationship with money. Although Kiyosaki can take a frustratingly long time to make his points, his book is nonetheless a compelling advocate for the type of "financial literacy" that's never taught in schools. Based on the principle that income-generating assets always provide healthier bottom-line results than even the best of traditional jobs, it explains how the former might be acquired so that the latter eventually can be shed. --Howard Rothman, Amazon.com

Amazon.com

Personal-finance author and lecturer Robert Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective through exposure to a pair of disparate influences: his own highly educated but fiscally unstable father, and the multimillionaire eighth-grade dropout father of his closest friend. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his "poor dad" (whose weekly paychecks, while respectable, were never quite sufficient to meet family needs) pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his "rich dad" (that "the poor and the middle class work for money," but "the rich have money work for them"). Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. Rich Dad, Poor Dad, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his the philosophy behind his relationship with money. Although Kiyosaki can take a frustratingly long time to make his points, his book nonetheless compellingly advocates for the type of "financial literacy" that's never taught in schools. Based on the principle that income-generating assets always provide healthier bottom-line results than even the best of traditional jobs, it explains how those assets might be acquired so that the jobs can eventually be shed. --Howard Rothman

From Library Journal

In this solid collection of practical advice on how to become a millionaire, Kiyosaki (Rich Dad's Guide to Investing) adds to his rapidly growing library of well-received works on achieving financial freedom. Built on his number one rule of genuinely understanding the difference between assets (income-producing property) and liabilities (bank-owned mortgage), he reveals lessons learned from his "rich dad" (the entrepreneur father of his childhood friend), e.g., the rich do not work for money (money works for them), the rich mind their own business (not merely working at a profession), and invest time in learning financial literacy (mostly not learned in school). With the contrasting philosophy from his poor dad his own highly educated but debt-ridden, asset-poor professor father this approach clearly is head and shoulders above the gamut of countless other financial advice titles that merely focus on how financial tools work. The always crisp narration by Richard M. Davidson maintains attention to this important book, which all twentysomethings should be forced to listen to in its entirety. Be forewarned; listeners will have to acknowledge self-responsibility for their own financial problems that yet another, still higher-paying job will not solve. Without question, this is absolutely essential for all libraries. Dale Farris, Groves, TX
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Pressestimmen

'RICH DAD, POOR DAD is a starting point for anyone looking to gain control of their financial future' USA TODAY 'Robert Kiyosaki's work in education is powerful, profound, and life changing. I salute his efforts and recommend him highly' Anthony Robbins

Kurzbeschreibung

Anyone stuck in the rat-race of living paycheck to paycheck, enslaved by the house mortgage and bills, will appreciate this breath of fresh air. Learn about the methods that have created more than a few millionaires. This is the first abridged miniature edition of Rich Dad Poor Dad. The full-length edition has sold millions as a New York Times bestseller. As proven by the runaway success of The Secret and like titles, changing one’s thinking to influence one’s fortune sells big, and forms the basis of rich dad’s advice. Learn to think like a rich dad and let your money work for you!

Synopsis

Personal finance author and lecturer Robert T. Kiyosaki developed his unique economic perspective from two very different influences - his two fathers. One father (Robert's real father) was a highly educated man but fiscally poor. The other father was the father of Robert's best friend - that Dad was an eighth-grade drop-out who became a self-made multi-millionaire. The lifelong monetary problems experienced by his 'poor dad' pounded home the counterpoint communicated by his 'rich dad'. Taking that message to heart, Kiyosaki was able to retire at 47. RICH DAD, POOR DAD, written with consultant and CPA Sharon L. Lechter, lays out his philosophy behind Kiyosaki's relationship with money and opens readers eyes by: * Exploding the myth that you need to earn a high income to be rich * Challenging the belief that your house is an asset * Showing parents why they can't rely on schools to teach their children about money * Defining once and for all an asset versus a liability ...* Explaining what to teach your children about money for their future financial success

Autorenkommentar

The rules of money that the rich play by.
I am greatly concerned by the growing gap between the "haves" and "have nots." In the next few years there will be great economic and political upheavals. Many of today's "haves" will join the "have nots." There will also be many more ultra-rich "haves" created. Great new fortunes are being made as we enter an age of unprecendented abundance and prosperity. Today, a great education is more important than ever before. But to continue to advise a child to simply, "Study hard, get good grades, and find a secure job," could be the most dangerous advice a parent could give a child. If a child follows that advice, they will probably wind up working harder, being paid less, paying more than their fair share in taxes, and remain in a high risk position of financial uncertainty. As I said, the rules have changed. This book will teach you the rules of money that the rich play by. They are not the same. May you find some new ideas from reading this book. Ideas by which you can insure greater economic security for you and those you love for generations to come.

Über den Autor

A 4th-generation Japanese American, Kiyosaki was educated in New York before joining the U.S. Marines and serving in Vietnam as a helicopter gunship pilot. In 1977 he founded a company producing Nylon and Velcro 'surfer' wallets which became a multi-million dollar business.

Leseprobe. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Bereitet die Schule die Kinder auf das echte Leben vor? Meine Eltern pflegten zu sagen: »Wenn du fleißig lernst und gute Noten schreibst, bekommst du einen gut bezahlten Job und hervorragende Arbeitgeberleistungen obendrein.« Ihr Lebensziel war es, meiner großen Schwester und mir das Studium zu ermöglichen und uns damit den besten Start in ein erfolgreiches Leben zu geben. Als ich mir 1976 endlich mein Diplom verdient hatte - ich schloss das Studium zur Wirtschaftsprüferin an der Florida State Universität mit Auszeichnung und als eine der Besten meines Jahrgangs ab -, hatten meine Eltern ihr Ziel erreicht. Es war die Krönung ihres Lebens. Ich wurde - genau nach Plan - von einem der acht führenden Wirtschaftsprüfungsunternehmen angestellt und freute mich auf ein langes Berufsleben sowie einen frühen Ruhestand.
Mein Mann Michael ging einen ähnlichen Weg. Wir stammen beide aus tüchtigen Familien mit bescheidenen finanziellen Mitteln, aber hoher Arbeitsmoral. Auch Michael schloss sein Studium mit Auszeichnung ab - nur tat er das gleich zweimal: zuerst als Ingenieur, dann als Jurist. Schnell wurde er von einer angesehenen Kanzlei in Washington, D.C., eingestellt, wo man sich auf Patentrecht spezialisiert hatte. Allem Anschein nach sah seine Zukunft rosig aus, sein Berufsweg war klar vorgezeichnet, der frühe Ruhestand garantiert.
Wir sind beide beruflich erfolgreich, trotzdem haben sich unsere Karrieren anders entwickelt als erwartet. Wir haben beide ein paar Mal - aus den richtigen Gründen - den Arbeitsplatz gewechselt, doch eine betriebliche Altersvorsorge gibt es für uns nicht. Das Geld für unseren Ruhestand vermehrt sich nur dank eigener freiwilliger Beiträge.
Michael und ich führen eine wunderbare Ehe, und wir haben drei großartige Kinder. Während ich diese Zeilen schreibe, besuchen zwei davon die Universität, das dritte kommt gerade auf die Highschool. Wir geben ein Vermögen dafür aus, damit unsere Kinder nur ja die bestmögliche Ausbildung bekommen.
1996 kam eines meiner Kinder eines Tages enttäuscht von der Schule nach Hause. Das Lernen langweilte ihn, und er war es leid. »Warum soll ich für irgendwelche Fächer lernen, die ich im Leben nie mehr brauche?«, protestierte er.
Ohne nachzudenken erwiderte ich: »Weil du gute Noten brauchst, um zum Studium zugelassen zu werden.«
»Ich werde reich«, antwortete er, »ob mit oder ohne Studium.«
»Ohne Studium bekommst du keinen ordentlichen Job«, sagte ich daraufhin mit einer Spur von Panik und mütterlicher Sorge. »Und wie willst du ohne einen ordentlichen Job reich werden?«
Mein Sohn grinste und schüttelte leicht gelangweilt den Kopf. Wir führten dieses Gespräch nicht zum ersten Mal. Er senkte den Kopf und rollte die Augen. Wieder einmal traf meine mütterliche Weisheit auf taube Ohren.
Mein Sohn ist ein kluger und willensstarker, aber auch ein höflicher und respektvoller junger Mann.
»Mama«, setzte er an. Nun durfte ich mir eine Predigt anhören. »Du musst mit der Zeit gehen! Schau dich doch um: Die reichsten Menschen sind nicht wegen ihrer Ausbildung reich. Sieh dir Michael Jordan und Madonna an. Bill Gates hat sein Harvardstudium hingeschmissen und Microsoft gegründet. Jetzt ist er der reichste Mann Amerikas und noch nicht mal vierzig. Es gibt einen Baseballspieler, der über vier Millionen Dollar im Jahr verdient, obwohl er als ›geistig behindert‹ gilt.«
Wir schwiegen lange. Mir dämmerte, dass ich meinem Sohn denselben Rat gab, den meine Eltern mir gegeben hatten. Die Welt um uns herum hatte sich verändert, aber mein Rat war der gleiche geblieben.
Eine gute Ausbildung und gute Noten sind keine Erfolgsgarantie mehr, und offenbar hat das bis auf unsere Kinder niemand bemerkt.
»Mama«, fuhr er fort, »ich will nicht so hart arbeiten wie du und Papa. Ihr verdient viel Geld, und wir leben in einem Riesenhaus und haben ganz tolle Spielsachen. Und wenn ich deinen Rat befolge, stehe ich am Ende so da wie ihr. Ich werde immer mehr arbeiten, um immer mehr Steuern zu zahlen, und am Ende werde ich dann mit Schulden dastehen. Es gibt keine sicheren Arbeitsplätze mehr. Ich weiß alles über Personalabbau. Ich weiß auch, dass Studienabgänger heutzutage weniger verdienen als damals, als ihr angefangen habt zu arbeiten. Sieh dir doch die Ärzte an. Die verdienen lange nicht mehr so gut wie früher. Ich weiß, dass ich mich, was meinen Ruhestand angeht, weder auf die öffentliche Rentenversicherung noch auf eine Betriebsrente verlassen kann. Ich brauche neue Antworten.«
Er hatte Recht. Er brauchte neue Antworten, genau wie ich. Der Rat meiner Eltern mag für die Generation sinnvoll gewesen sein, die vor 1945 geboren wurde, aber für diejenigen, die in diese sich schnell wandelnde Welt hineingeboren werden, kann er katastrophale Auswirkungen haben. Ich kann meinen Kindern nicht mehr einfach sagen: »Lerne fleißig, schreib gute Noten und such dir einen sicheren Job.«
Ich wusste, dass ich nach neuen Ausbildungsmöglichkeiten für meine Kinder Ausschau halten musste.
Als Mutter und als Wirtschaftsprüferin bereitet es mir Sorge, dass unsere Kinder in der Schule keinerlei finanzielle Bildung bekommen. Viele Jugendliche haben heute schon eine Kreditkarte, bevor sie die Highschool verlassen, aber sie lernen nichts über Geld oder wie man es investiert - und wie sich Zins und Zinseszins auf Kreditkartenschulden auswirken, wissen sie schon gar nicht. Kurz gesagt, ohne ein solides finanzielles Grundwissen und ohne zu wissen, wie Geld arbeitet, sind sie auf die Welt, die sie erwartet, nicht vorbereitet. Auf eine Welt, in der das Geldausgeben einen höheren Stellenwert hat als das Sparen.
Als sich mein ältester Sohn in seinem ersten Jahr auf der Universität hoffnungslos in Kreditkartenschulden verstrickte, half ich ihm nicht nur, besagte Kreditkarten zu vernichten, sondern machte mich zudem auf die Suche nach einem Programm, das mir dabei helfen sollte, meine Kinder in finanziellen Dingen zu unterweisen.
Letztes Jahr rief mich mein Mann eines Tages aus dem Büro an. »Da ist jemand, den du kennen lernen solltest«, sagte er. »Er heißt Robert Kiyosaki. Er ist Geschäftsmann und Investor und möchte ein Lernspiel zum Patent anmelden. Ich glaube, das ist genau das, was du suchst.«
Genau das, was ich suche.
CASHFLOW, das neue Lernspiel, das Robert Kiyosaki gerade entwickelte, beeindruckte meinen Mann Mike so sehr, dass er uns beide zu einem Test des Prototyps anmeldete.
Da es sich um ein Lernspiel handelte, fragte ich auch meine 19-jährige Tochter, die gerade ihr Studium an der örtlichen Universität aufgenommen hatte, ob sie teilnehmen wollte. Sie sagte ja.
An dem Test nahmen insgesamt etwa fünfzehn Personen in drei Gruppen teil.
Mike hatte Recht. Das Spiel war genau das, wonach ich suchte. Aber es hatte einen Haken. Es sah aus wie ein buntes Monopolybrett mit einer gut gekleideten Ratte in der Mitte. Im Gegensatz zum Monopoly-Spiel gab es zwei Spielbahnen: eine innere und eine äußere. Ziel des Spiels war es, die innere Bahn - die Robert als »die Tretmühle« bezeichnete - zu verlassen und auf die äußere oder »die Überholspur« zu wechseln. Robert erklärte, die Überholspur zeige genau, wie sich die Reichen im wirklichen Leben verhielten.
Dann gab uns Robert seine Definition der »Tretmühle«.
»Wenn Sie sich das Leben durchschnittlich gebildeter, hart arbeitender Menschen ansehen, werden Sie gewisse Ähnlichkeiten entdecken. Das Kind kommt auf die Welt und geht zur Schule. Die stolzen Eltern sind entzückt, weil es sich ganz gut macht, durchschnittliche bis gute Noten schreibt und einen Studienplatz ergattert. Das Kind schließt sein Studium ab, macht vielleicht sogar noch einen weiteren Abschluss, und tut dann genau das, worauf es programmiert wurde: Es begibt sich auf die Suche nach einem sicheren Arbeitsplatz oder einem sicheren Beruf. Das Kind findet ihn, wird Arzt oder Anwalt, geht zum Militär oder wird Beamter. Im...
‹  Zurück zur Artikelübersicht