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Programming Windows Azure (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 17. Juni 2010


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Sriram Krishnan works on the Windows Azure program management team. Though his day job doesn't involve writing code anymore, he is a geek developer at heart and you'll have to pry his text editor away from his cold, dead hands. He is a prolific speaker and blogger in the cloud computing space in general and Windows Azure specifically. Prior to Windows Azure, Sriram worked on Microsoft Popfly where he built among other things, advanced search functionality as well as an distributed network cache system. Sriram blogs at www.sriramkrishnan.com

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Amazon.com: 15 Rezensionen
51 von 59 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Pathetic 21. Juli 2010
Von Craig McMurtry - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
The author does little more than recap information that is readily available in the SDK documentation, and has added hardly any thought about the practicalities of Azure development. (In fact, I could find NO evidence of such thought, but I've written "hardly any," in case I missed an iota.) For example, if you want to use an Azure Worker Role, you might create one from the template provided by the Azure SDK add-in to Microsoft Visual Studio. You will peruse the automatically-generated code and think to yourself, perhaps, "okay: what are the implications of the different alternatives for sleeping on the thread in the Run() method." You won't find that question or any others answered in Krishnan's book, though. What you will find is text that simply restates what you will read in the generated template. So save yourself $49.99 and just download the SDK and read the templates. Perhaps you want to use SQL Azure in your solution? The author devotes 9 pages to that subject. Here are a couple of things you might want to do if you actually want to use SQL Azure:

(1) Take a definition of an existing database and deploy that into Azure. There is nothing at all on how one might accomplish that ... not so much as a hand-wave in the direction of the Visual Studio Database Edition facilities that would allow you to generate a complete definition of your database for deployment to SQL Azure.

(2) Connect to a SQL Azure database from an Azure Web or Worker role. Krishnan has a code snippet showing how to accomplish that (which one could have found in the Azure SDK documentation easily enough) but not a word about how one might not HARD CODE the connection parameters, but instead get them from configuration, and, in that case, how best to secure the configuration information.

Questions like these would arise for anyone who is actually trying to write anything more than a "Hello, World" application, and who develops software professionally. There are no answers to any of those sorts of questions here. I believe I have read all of the books on Azure published to date, and among those, Tejaswi Redkar's "Windows Azure Platform," is by far the best.
19 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Terribly out-of-date 9. März 2011
Von Vicki - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I do not envy anyone charged with writing this book---particularly for publication in 2010. Mr. Krishnan is unquestionably comfortable with the subject of Windows Azure, but the truth is that as of March 2011, much of the detailed advice in this book is hopelessly out of date. That says more about the speed and timing of Microsoft's portal design-changes and releases of new SDKs than it does about the author, but the simple fact is that much of the actual advice here leads to confusion and failed efforts.

Just a few examples:
--CSPack command-line tool examples failed with errors having nothing to do with environment paths, etc.
--Names of seminal tools have changed: Development Fabric (DevFabric) is now Compute Emulator; Development Storage is now known as Storage Emulator.
--The MS Azure Development Portal has radically changed both in terms of look and feel and in its usage.

In short, look for Azure books published in 2011 or later. The concepts are difficult enough, without having to create your own glossary to translate obsolete names of important tools.

Hopefully, Mr. Krishnan has a 2nd edition coming out soon.
Helpful beginners guide to Azure 8. Juli 2010
Von Philip Taron - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I'm just starting on programming services in Windows Azure, and this book really helped me make sense of the various options I have in doing so, as well as how they relate to concepts I already know in the CLR and .NET. I really appreciated the narrative flow of the book: it was laid out the way that I think about building a service, not as a textbook as so many books in this genre are. The sections on Windows Azure storage, in particular, made reading through the documentation on MSDN much more meaningful; the descriptions of the motivations, from a programmer's perspective, of the available options were much appreciated.

On the con side, if you're looking for a book that lays out common architectures for distributed systems and how they might be implemented in Azure, this isn't the book. There are two or three complete examples, only one of which is a common patterns for services. The discussion of queues in particular seemed abbreviated, since they are such a key ingredient of distributed systems.

All told, though, I am very happy I purchased this book; I've already referred back to it several times in prototyping and expect to do so again.
2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Excellent introduction to Azure with good insight into the project's genesis 17. Juni 2010
Von Franck Jeannin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
When a new technology is released (especially something as visible as Microsoft Azure) lots of publishers (and authors) jump on the bandwagon thinking that timing is what really matters and quality is... well, a nice to have.
If you fear that Programming Windows Azure is one of those books, stop worrying. Not only the quality is definitively there but you also get lots of inside information on the genesis of Azure that shows that the author was involved in the project from the very beginning.
Granted, you don't absolutely need to know why some design decisions were made in order to program for Azure but it helps you get the big picture which in turn will make you a better Architect.
So, if you want to learn about Azure and be able to write your first Azure application within a few hours or if you want to know why there is a dog on the book cover or why traffic lights don't work in India, read this book!
Ongoing Review 27. Mai 2011
Von Mark - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This is an ongoing review. I will update as I make my way through the book, but wanted you to know my impressions along the way.

Chapter 1: Interesting history about cloud computing. I started to read carefully, but became bored and switched to skimming.

Chapter 2: Windows Azure Under the hood. A little more interesting than chapter 1, but still at a very high level. The author seemed to ramble. Perhaps I'm just impatient.

Chapter 3: Your first cloud app. The author has you create a simple web site by hand (notepad). I had to fix a few inevitable typos. When deploying, the book example uses the 'old' developer portal.

Chapter 4: Service Model. Chapter starts by explaining roles.

Ongoing...
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