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Process Consultation: Lessons for Managers and Consultants, Volume II (Prentice Hall Organizational Development Series): Its Role in Organizational Development [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Edgar H. Schein , Schein
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Kurzbeschreibung

1. Januar 1987 Process Consultation

A member of the PH OD Series! Volume II clarifies the concept of process consultation as a viable model of how to work with human systems as defined in the previous volume, Process Consultation: Its Role in Organization Development (19 69), and introduces modifications and new ideas that elaborate on and have evolved beyond the material in the first volume. Included are such topics as cultural rules of interaction; initiating and managing change; intervention strategy; tactics and style; and emerging issues in process consultation.


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Process Consultation: Lessons for Managers and Consultants, Volume II (Prentice Hall Organizational Development Series): Its Role in Organizational Development + Helping: How to Offer, Give, and Receive Help
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 208 Seiten
  • Verlag: Addison Wesley Pub Co Inc; Auflage: Student. (1. Januar 1987)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0201067447
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201067446
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 21,2 x 14,2 x 1,3 cm
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Synopsis

A member of the PH OD Series! Volume II clarifies the concept of process consultation as a viable model of how to work with human systems as defined in the previous volume, Process Consultation: Its Role in Organization Development (19 69), and introduces modifications and new ideas that elaborate on and have evolved beyond the material in the first volume. Included are such topics as cultural rules of interaction; initiating and managing change; intervention strategy; tactics and style; and emerging issues in process consultation.

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3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen If you are a consultant this book is a must read 27. November 2002
Format:Taschenbuch
This book you must read when you are in the position that you are suppose to influence an organisation, for example a manager or a consultant. A naiv view would be that by structuring the organisation differently or by introducing a new technology the problems of the organisation will be solved. After a while given that one has enough contact with the same organisation one sees that no, either the problem persists or other problems have replaced the old one.
In this book you get introduced to the three different models of consultations, get your eyes opened about human processes in an organisation, get some awareness about the communication processes among members of an organisation, the process of building and maintaining a group, group problem solving and decision making, group growth and development of norms and culture, and many other topics that one needs to understand when working with people.
The author then in the second part of the book shift the focus from process issues to the consultation activities, and looks into the steps and stages that characterise the Process consultation relationship including; initial contact with the client organisation, defining the relationship, psychological contract, selecting a setting and method or work, diagnostic interventions and data gathering, confrontive interventions and reducing involvement and termination and he does that with giving case studies.
This is a must reading for a consultant and for the manager having a consultant.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Process Consultation Volume II Review 20. Juni 2003
Von Andrew A. Hoover - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
In this second volume, Schein builds on Volume I by dissecting the nature of process and change in lieu of the specific group processes that make or break effective group work. Likewise, in this volume, he brings the concept of process consultation home, so to speak, to help managers and leaders understand themselves and their organizations as a consultant might understand them.
Given that process consultation assumes that organizational leaders know their organizations best and are the most appropriate and capable managers of change, it makes sense that organizational leaders understand group processes. Schein emphasizes that diagnosing an organization's problems is intervening to fix them. He provides explanations of the circumstances when process consultation is most necessary. He advises leaders that more time must be spent intervening on how things get done than on what actually needs to get done. "An effective manager must be able to create situations that will ensure that good decisions are made, without making those decisions himself and without even knowing ahead of time what he might do if he had to make the decision alone." (p.39)
Schein provides a useful model for differentiating between the content, process, and structure of organizational challenges and the task and interpersonal aspects of those challenges. He advises that process should always be favored over content; that task aspects should always be favored over the interpersonal; and that structure, while potentially the most transformative element of change, is the most difficult area to address, because people will resist tampering with the comfort structure provides. He also provides explanations on the essential challenges relevant to content and process that every group must face. The lesson he offers for leaders and consultants is that whatever is done to solve a problem must begin with a clarification of the primary task of the group.
Schein devotes considerable space to explaining the ORJI model of intrapsychic processes. (We observe, we react - emotionally, we judge based on our observations and feelings, and we intervene to make something happen.) "The most important thing for managers or consultants to understand is what goes on inside their own heads." (p.63) The trap of ORJI is MIRI, i.e., that we misperceive, inappropriately react, react rationally based on bad data, and intervene incorrectly. To avoid the MIRI trap, we must check our cultural assumptions, our personal filters (see volume I), and our situational expectations based on previous experiences. Schein also provides a clear synthesis of the unfreezing, changing, refreezing model of change and improvement. In unfreezing, the motivation and readiness for change are developed; in changing, new points of view are adopted; and in refreezing, new points of view are integrated to affect changes in the process approaches to tasks.
Schein devotes most of the latter half of his book to explanations and analyses of intervention processes. He discusses the "exploratory", "diagnostic", "action alternative", and "confrontive" models of intervening, how they might initiated and when one might use each. "...The tactics of intervention should focus initially on exploration, inquiry, and diagnosis. Only when the consultant feels that the client is ready to think about alternative next steps is it appropriate to move to action alternatives and confrontive interventions." (p.157) Schein also provides specific kinds of interventions which might fall into any one of these four basic categories of intervention.
This volume, taken with the first, provide not only a clear theoretical framework for understanding organizational change, but also useful tools and approaches for pre-empting organizational roadblocks and addressing organizational dilemmas once they've appeared. These books are essential reading for any leader or consultant.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Not your regular Consultant type 27. Januar 2003
Von Gautam Ghosh - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
If you are interested in this high challenging and highly satisfying skill of becoming a process consultant, read this book, by one of the biggest names in the PC universe...Edgar Schien. This book is a classic and all OD consultants should read it !
Process Consulting is not the typical consulting intervention where 20 somethings come into your organization, do a survey and hand over a thick report after collecting $ per hour !!
Process Consulting is both an art and craft performed by people who intervene in organization systems that are seen as 'human systems' and are sensitive in not inducing 'dependency' of the client. The delicate art is to intervene at the process level rather than the content level and extricate without creating much ripples. Most known consulting deals with 'content' consulting and therefore has more measurale outcomes than the supposedly soft process consulting.
Process consulting is truly empowering and the consultant is a traveller in the process of discovery with the client, constantly asking questions.
21 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Process Consultation: Its Role in Organization Development 6. April 2000
Von Greg Schaller - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Schein sees the vital importance balancing the clients tasks and relationships in the work place. Helping clients see the vital importance of thier teams interpersonal relationships can leads to efficient task performance. And Schein in Process Consultation offers priceless insight into consulting clients so effective performance results through the unitied efforts of people and teams. The charts on problem solving and rating group effectiveness are worth the price alone. A must have for leaders and consultants.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The use of process consultation to improve organizations 17. Mai 2005
Von Gerard Kroese - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Edgar H. Schein is Professor of Management Emeritus in the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a real academic heavyweight having written numerous books, articles and papers. In 1969 he published 'Process Consultation: Its Role in Organizational Development', of which he states that he "was writing more in anger than with perspective". In this follow-up book he tried to explain and clarify the concept of consultation and helping which was outlined in the first volume. "The goals of this new book, then, are (1) to reaffirm the concept of process consultation as a viable model of how to work with human systems, (2) to clarify the concept were needed, and (3) to introduce some modifications and new ideas that elaborate on the original ideas."

The book is split up in 3 parts. In Part I - Introduction and Overview, which consists of three chapters, Schein introduces the common grounds of managers and consultants (which is the helping orientation), process consultation, and "the process" itself. He introduces a definition of process consultation which "is a set of activities on the part of the consultant that help the client to perceive, understand, and act upon the process events that occur in the client's environment." Whereby he emphasizes that the concept of process central is to understanding consultation and management. "Process refers to how things are done rather than what is done." He continues, "Process is everywhere. In order to help, intervene, and facilitate human problem solving, one must focus on communication and interpersonal processes."

In Part II - Simplifying Models of Human Processes, which also consists of three chapters, Schein examines several models of consultation and argues that the process-consultation model works for consultants as interveners and is potentially most useful for managers. "The most important thing for managers or consultants to understand is what goes on inside their own heads." He introduces the basic ORJI cycle, which is based on the fact that our nervous system observes (O), reacts (R), analyzes, processes, and make judgments (J), and intervenes in order to make something happen (I). He later updates this cycle into a more realistic depiction of the ORJI cycle, through the introduction of 4 traps. Schein than states that the cultural rules of interaction is possibly the most powerful determinant whether a viable helping relationship will be established. In the final chapter of this part, he examines in detail a simplified model of the change process: (1) Unfreezing; (2) changing; and (3) refreezing.

In the final part of the book - The Consulting Process in Action, which is also the longest part of the book with five chapters, the author examines in detail the strategy and tactics of intervention. "The most important point to be made about clients is that the consultant must always be clear who the client is at any given moment in time, and must distinguish clearly among contact, intermediate, primary, and ultimate client." Schein discusses what the consultant or manager can actually say or do to accomplish some of the goals of process consultation. "The strategy and tactics of intervention have to be guided by the ultimate assumptions underlying the helping process." In addition, he provides categories of types of interventions and discusses the possible dilemmas that can arise in the consultation processes. "The skill of intervening is to be so tuned in to what is going on that one's sense of timing and appropriateness is based on the external events, not one's internal assumptions or theories."

Yes, this is a good book on process consultation. I was somewhat concerned when I started reading this book, due to Schein's highly academical background. However, the book has been a revelation. It is highly practical and has good tips on which can be put in practical use. I believe that it useful for both consultants and managers, as the author set out from the start. I believe that the three parts can be read in any order, whereby the last part is possibly the most useful as it is the most practical. Please note that the writing style is now somewhat outdated and academical. Highly recommended to consultants and managers alike.
9 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Process Consultation 20. Juni 2003
Von Andrew A. Hoover - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This volume and its follow-up, Volume II, are essential reading for consultants and anyone interesting in taking a leadership role in improving an organization. Schein devotes entire chapters to the key human processes in organizations: communication, roles, group problem-solving, group decision-making, leadership and authority, intergroup processes, and interventions. In each one, he not only explains what he has learned through years of study and experience, but also the most salient aspects of organizational theory relevant to each area.
Schein differentiates process consultation from other forms of consultation by first making clear the role of the process consultant, who is not an expert providing information or advice, but rather a coach who seeks to help a client understand and act on events, which happen in the client's organization. Consulting is helping the client to understand problems and to decide how to solve them. The consultant's role is to teach diagnostic and problem-solving skills, not to work on the actual problems.
Communication is a central group process critical for effective functioning of groups and organizations. The process-consultant can help a client understand the communication patterns in a group by assessing who talks whom and how much. Interruptions, who interrupts whom, how much and when can be useful information when attempting to diagnose an organization's shortcomings. Schein includes in this chapter an explanation of the filters, which inhibit or enhance an individual's capacity to communicate effectively. They are: self-image, the image of other people, the definition of the situation, motives, feelings, intentions, attitudes, and expectations. When groups come together to accomplish a goal, certain predictable tensions may undermine the groups ability to solve problems. Individuals in the group may be concerned with their own role in the group, their ability or expectation to influence the group, the need to have the group's goals connect with their own goals, or whether they will be accepted and respected in the group. Sometimes groups need assistance in identifying and processing these tensions before they can concern themselves with the necessary task and maintenance functions required to accomplish their task.
For groups to solve problems they must become good at problem formulation, evaluating solutions, forecasting consequences and testing proposals, action planning, implementing action steps, and evaluating outcomes. Schein offers sage advice for groups wishing to develop their capacity to improve: (1) Don't confuse the symptom with the problem itself (2) Don't evaluate courses of action prematurely - remain open (3) Test proposals using multiple sources and methods, and (4) Plan for action carefully and methodically. Schein offers clear explanations of various decision-making models, which are helpful for a consultant or leader to understand. Groups will function most effectively when the decision-making model is clear and understood. Often models are employed by default, which can alienate and undermine group members and subvert effective improvement efforts. A central failure of leadership is often the gap between what leaders say and how they behave. An effective leaders and process consultants need to become experts in this problem and its potential effects. Awareness of group processes will not only help the leader avoid interpersonal or intergroup problems, but it will also help solve them should they arise. Schein includes useful sets of Likert scales to rate group effectiveness and mature group processes; a model of the stages of group problem-solving; and a continuum of leadership behavior.
Schein's view of the process consultant as a capacity builder parallels his implicit view that organizational leaders need to understand and seek patterns of behavior that downplay coercion and expertise and emphasize participation and differentiated responsibility. This volume and its partner, despite their ages, are still relevant and useful to the leader or consultant.
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