Practical Malware Analysis und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 8,26 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von Practical Malware Analysis auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Practical Malware Analysis: The Hands-On Guide to Dissecting Malicious Software [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Michael Sikorski , Andrew Honig
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
Unverb. Preisempf.: EUR 48,00
Preis: EUR 36,95 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
Sie sparen: EUR 11,05 (23%)
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 2 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Freitag, 1. August: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 25,74  
Taschenbuch EUR 36,95  

Kurzbeschreibung

28. Februar 2012
Malware analysis is big business, and attacks can cost a company dearly. When malware breaches your defenses, you need to act quickly to cure current infections and prevent future ones from occurring. For those who want to stay ahead of the latest malware, Practical Malware Analysis will teach you the tools and techniques used by professionals analysts. With this book as your guide, you'll be able to safely analyze, debug, and disassemble any malicious software that comes your way. You'll learn how to: - Set up safe virtual environment to analyze malware - Quickly extract network signatures and host-based indicators - Use key analysis tools like IDA Pro, OllyDbg, and WinDbg - Overcome malware tricks like obfuscation, anti-disassembly, anti-debugging, and anti-virtual machine techniques - Use your newfound knowlegde of Windows internals for malware analysis - Develop a methodology for unpacking malware and get practical experience with five of the most popular packers - Analyze special cases of malware with shellcode, C++, and 64-bit code Hands-on labs throughout the book challenge you to practice and synthesize your skills as you dissect real malware samples, and pages of detailed dissections offer an over-the-shoulder look at how the pros do it. You'll learn how to crack open malware to see how it really works, determine what damage it has done, thoroughly clean your network, and ensure that the malware never comes back. Malware analysis is a cat-and-mouse game with rules that are constantly changing, so make sure you have the fundamentals. Whether you're tasked with securing one network or a thousand networks, or you're making a living as a malware analyst, you'll find what you need to succeed in Practical Malware Analysis.

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Amazon Trade-In: Tauschen Sie Ihre gebrauchten Bücher gegen einen Amazon.de Gutschein ein - wir übernehmen die Versandkosten. Mehr erfahren


Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Practical Malware Analysis: The Hands-On Guide to Dissecting Malicious Software + Reversing: Secrets of Reverse Engineering + The IDA Pro Book: The Unofficial Guide to the World's Most Popular Disassembler
Preis für alle drei: EUR 110,30

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 798 Seiten
  • Verlag: No Starch Press; Auflage: 1 (28. Februar 2012)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1593272901
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593272906
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23,5 x 17,9 x 3,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 8.079 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Michael Sikorski is a Principal Consultant at Mandiant. He provides specialized research and development security solutions to the company's federal client base, reverse engineers malicious software discovered by incident responders, and has helped create a series of courses in malware analysis (from Beginner to Advanced). He has taught these courses to a variety of audiences including the FBI, the National Security Agency (NSA), and BlackHat. A former member of MIT's Lincoln Laboratory and the NSA, he holds a Top Secret security clearance.Andrew Honig is an Information Assurance Expert for the Department of Defense. He teaches courses on software analysis, reverse engineering, and Windows system programming. Andy is publicly credited with several zero-day exploits in VMware's virtualization products.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
5.0 von 5 Sternen
5.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen empfehlenswert 28. Dezember 2013
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
ein Muß für IT-Forensiker - kann man wirklich nur empfehlen - für Laien nicht geeignet - man muß schon Basiswissen haben
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen Hervorragend 17. Oktober 2013
Von Someone
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Das Buch ist hervorragend geschrieben und bietet auch mit seinen praktischen Übungen und den verlinkten Übungsdateien den benötigten praktischen Teil zu üben.

Es wird das gesamte nötige Basiswissen vermittelt um in die Malwareanalyse einzusteigen.
Es wird auch die übliche Softwar vorgestellt und gezeigt wie und wozu man diese verwendet.

Man sollte natürlich nicht ohne Vorkenntnisse dieses Buch lesen, z.B. sollte man in der Lage sein sowohl Windows als auch Linux zu benutzen, man sollte Hexzahlen und Assembler Code verstehen können.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen nur ein schnelles "kudos" 13. Januar 2013
Von Apfelbaum
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Das Buch ist wirklich tiefschürfend, informativ, sehr gut strukturiert und auch für Einsteiger geeignet.
Sehr gutes Material zum Thema RE.
Top.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  37 Rezensionen
26 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen My passport into understanding malware 23. April 2012
Von Stephen Northcutt - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
have been carrying this book around for three weeks and I have only made it to page 604 which is deep in the appendices, but wanted to jot down some thoughts. The book tries to be self contained, as little prior knowledge as possible is assumed. They begin by talking about static ( not actually executing) and dynamic analysis followed by a malware taxonomy. By page 10 the authors show you something very useful, how to run MD5 on a Windows system. We also learn about packing which is very important in the analysis of malware and get introduced to PEiD, which unfortunately has been discontinued, version 0.95 is the last, but it still works fine. Next is PEview to look at the PE sections. All that is chapter one and my point is that anyone with a windows system and interest can use these tools and learn a lot about what goes on in a Windows system.

The next topic is virtual systems which is hugely important since you don't want to experiment with malware on your work laptop, no good can come of that. Chapter 3 requires the reader to be slightly technical, but it is all great stuff, process monitor and process explorer, and looking at strings and dependencies. I do not see how anyone that has hands on responsibility for security of Windows systems can rationalize not being familiar with these tools.

Chapter 4 is where they start the deep dive, registers and opcodes, the fundamentals of disassembly and of course we can't get anywhere without IDA Pro, so that comes right up.

Speaking of tools that have been around for a while, I was surprised that OllyDbg is still a major debugger, good on you Mr. Yuschuk. After this, the books starts to move past my technical depth. I did learn some things, I just could not follow everything, but here are a few facts I am glad I learned.

Most malware uses Berkeley style sockets, just like Unix
I really enjoyed the explanation on how to look at the Poison Ivy trojan with OllDbg
The explanation on how to use Netcat to create a reverse shell
How to use Pwdump and Pass-The-Hash
The whole concept of anti-debugging and especially using code checksums to identify a debugger is being used

Don't miss appendix B, they have taken many of the tools discussed in the text and put them in once place with a handy paragraph explanation for each one.
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Navigate the Wilds of Malware 18. April 2012
Von Michael Larsen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This is a topic that has greatly interested me, but from the perspective of a tester. On one side, I think the ability to reverse engineer malware is fascinating, but more to the point what I really want to be able to do is see how the tools described can actually be used to augment security testing.

Malware has become one of those topics that we often wring our hands about because we know it's a threat, we want to better comprehend it, but do we dare open ourselves up to the potential of doing something wrong and unleashing an unintended havoc on our machines or networks? Fortunately, Michael Sikorski & Andrew Honig's book "Practical Malware Analysis" helps to de-mystify this type of operation, and also make it understandable from a variety of perspectives. If you are a programmer, this will be very handy. Even if you aren't, there is a lot of good ideas and techniques in this book that you can use.

Practical Malware Analysis is structured with regular chapters describing the concepts, and each chapter ends with a series of labs. the answers to these labs take up nearly a third of the book. They consist of short answers for the specific questions as well as longer form answers that go into great detail to describe the steps and the methods used to test the files and provide analysis of what was found.

Part 1 starts out by explaining what Malware is and how developers and testers can get into the files and poke around using some basic and freely available tools. The first part of the book focuses on performing static analysis of files and looking inside them to understand what might be hiding in the files, along with ways o read the headers, strings and data hidden in the files. To get beyond the static analysis, the users are guided through setting up a virtual machine environment using VMWare. Dynamic Analysis is what happens when a piece of malware is actually run, and the determination is made that static analysis just won't cut it any longer. From here, we need to actually start poking at the malware and see what it will do in real time (yep, in that safe VM, using what's referred to as a "Malware Sandbox" consisting of a variety of free tools).

Part 2 of the book goes into greater detail regarding performing more advanced Static Analysis techniques, including dis-assembly, specifically dis-assembly on x86 Architecture processors, reverse engineering using tools such as IDA Pro (it gets its own chapter and shows up in the future labs), examining how to get a high level view of the code using code constructs, and how to use the tools to recognize when we are seeing those code constructs in assembly language. since Windows is the target of choice for most malware, Chapter 7 goes into specifics about how to recognize and work with the Windows API and use the registry editor to analyze registry code. Processes, threads, and network functionality are also primary considerations.

Part 3 brings us into the realm of more advanced Dynamic Analysis. Starting with debugging at both language and assembler levels, we see how to step through programs a piece at a time so we can see what is happening or change the way the code executes. Dedicated chapters to OllyDbg (a user level debugger) and WinDbg (a kernel level debugger) show how to do these steps with these specific tools.

Part 4 focuses on the way that malware behaves and what sets a program apart as being malware. It examines a variety of back doors in the system and ways the program can steal credentials, and how it covers its tracks so as to not be easily detected. Chapter 12 focuses on how Malware starts itself, and the variety of methods it uses, including process replacement and DLL manipulation so that it looks like any other innocuous running process. Chapter 13 goes into a variety of methods of encoding and decryption, while Chapter 14 covers ways in which the network is utilized to to take advantage of exploits.

Part 5 is Anti-Reverse-Engineering, and goes into the steps that malware developers go to to prevent their programs from being found or being cracked, Obscuring flow control, confusing dis-assemblers, prevent debugging, performing steps to use virtual machine detection and change the behavior or not run at all, and using methods to compress or encrypt files so that they are packed away until a given time or condition are all part of the toolkit of the malware developer to throw the malware examiner/tester off their tracks. we have to realize that while we are trying to outsmart the malware developers, they are trying to outsmart us as well.

Part 6 is a grab back of special topics including shell code analysis, special considerations for C++ code and how it differs from C, and some of the special challenges that the 64 bit processors and code base face and will face in the future.

The book rounds out with there appendices; describing important windows functions, a grab bag of tools that can be used fr malware analysis, and the biggest single section of the book, which is the answers and analysis to all of the labs provided.

This is a big book, and it covers a lot of ground. It is of course geared towards software developers, but there's a tremendous wealth of information for the software tester, too. While we may not spend as much time de-compiling or reverse engineering the code, having the ability to see the techniques that malware developers use, and the techniques that we can use to ferret out and stop them is enlightening. This book focuses on Windows and Windows exploits, and it's meant to be an introductory primer. It's not the be all and end off of malware analysis, but for many of us who are not specifically trying to be security experts, it's a heck of an introduction.

More than being a good introduction, this is a "get your hands dirty and do so without putting your self or your neighbors in peril" book. This is a dicey topic, and its one where, in the wrong hands, or handled carelessly, you can do a lot of damage to your self and to others, so take the time to set up, wall off, and sand box as much as you can. Proceed with caution, but if you do proceed, you couldn't ask for a better tour guide.
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Best Book on Reverse Engineering Malware 5. Juli 2012
Von D. Quist - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Before getting into reviewing Practical Malware Analysis, I hope you will indulge me in a rant about other books on the reverse engineering topic: They are not pretty. If you've taken one of my classes I recommend a few books for learning reversing, but climbing the steep mountain of pre-requisite material before you can attempt to be somewhat proficient is daunting. Specifically the books I recommended were based off of each individual author's own personal style of reverse engineering with the tools that were available at the time. The field has gotten much more accessible thanks to the awesome tools that are out there from companies like Hex-Rays and Zynamics.

Practical Malware Analysis does a good job of tying together the methods of modern malware analysis. While most of the previous texts have done a good job of presenting the state of the art at their time, PMA overviews many of the tools that are in use in the modern day. Part 1 starts off with the basic static techniques, how to set up a virtual environment, and dynamic analysis. These initial steps are the basis for any good reversing environment. What is nice is that these topics aren't dwelled on for an entire book.

Part 2 goes over the relationships of the Intel architecture, IDA Pro, modern compilers, and the Windows operating system to reverse engineering. Having an understanding of this as it applies to the reversing process is extremely important. Outside implementing a compiler, learning the fundamentals of the architecture is the most important skill a reverser can have for understanding the field. The difference between an adequate reverser and a great reverser lies in the understanding of how the system interactions work.

The rest of the book is focused on the advanced topics of dynamic analysis. Part 5 deals with all the ways that malware authors can make your life miserable, from anti-disassembly to packers. Part 6, "Special Topics," talks about shellcode analysis, C++ specifics, and the ever-looming threat of 64-bit malware. I suspect that there will be a second edition once 64-bit malware comes in vogue.

Overall the book is excellent for those that are new to this field. Experts love to curmudgeonly talk about how nothing is new anymore, everything sucks, and pine for the good old days of reverse engineering with some wire-wrap, a lead pencil, a 9-volt Duracell, and a single LED. If you consider yourself one of these people, reading this book is going to feel a lot like wearing someone else's underwear. If, on the other hand, you read it and put aside your natural skepticism of all things new, you might learn something.

I really do like this book.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Essential Malware Analysis Book 19. Februar 2014
Von Christopher Sanders - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Before I begin, I have to disclose that I am a Mandiant employee, but I don't work directly with the authors of this book, nor do I have any sort of personal relationship with them. I have also published two books with No Starch Press. While I don't analyze malware exclusively for my job, I've done a fair amount of it as an auxiliary function of my work mostly focused on network security monitoring. I've also taken the SANS FOR610 Reverse Engineering Malware course and am GREM certified. I'd consider myself an experienced, but not expert level malware analyst.

With that said, Practical Malware Analysis is one of my absolute favorite information security books. The topic of dissecting malware can be very daunting, as it requires a broad array of knowledge to be done effectively. You have to be able to interpret code, have a knowledge of internal system workings, and be able to read between the lines using an analysts intuition. I think this book does an excellent job relaying these concepts.

PMA begins simply, starting with basic static and dynamic analysis. This also includes a discussion on setting up a virtual malware analysis lab. This is often enough to determine if a file malicious on its own. After this, the book quickly jumps to more advanced static and dynamic analysis concepts. PMA covers a wide away of topics, and touches on most every aspect of dissecting modern malware. If you are a beginner, then you will get plenty to sink your teeth into without feeling completely overwhelmed. If you are more experienced, you will find plenty of coverage of advanced topics, such as dealing with malware that has built in anti-debugging features.

My favorite portion of PMA are the labs included with almost every chapter. The authors have taken the time to write custom "malware" and find existing malware samples that accompany each topic. These allow the reader to try out the skills they've just learned and then compare them against a set of answers in the back of the book. I wish more books did this.

I work from home, and at my house I have a big bookshelf in my closet and a smaller bookshelf next to my desk. The books I've read that I don't use often are in the closet bookshelf. The books I've read that I use really often stay on the smaller shelf next to the desk. Not only does Practical Malware Analysis sit on the smaller bookshelf, it sits on the top of it along side such greats as "TCP/IP Illustrated." I think that is the best praise I can give a technical book.

Simply put, If you want to learn how to analyze malware at a casual or advanced level, then PMA is THE book to purchase. Kudos to Sikorski and Honig on a job amazingly well done.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen #1 book for advanced malware analysis. 16. Dezember 2012
Von Brent Freeman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The most impressive book on malware analysis (for advanced InfoSec gurus) to date.

- I'll update the review if anyone disagrees.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar