ARRAY(0xa085b2ac)
Port Out, Starboard Home und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 0,10 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von Port Out, Starboard Home auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Port Out, Starboard Home: The Fascinating Stories We Tell About the words We Use [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Michael Quinion
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
Preis: EUR 9,32 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Mittwoch, 23. April: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.
‹  Zurück zur Artikelübersicht

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Michael Quinion's World Wide Words is the web authority on English etymology (word origins) and usage-come here for definitive information on some of the most interesting, amusing and downright weird words and phrases in the English language. (Cambridge Dictionaries Online web site (February 2003) )

Synopsis

Can it really be true that 'golf' stands for 'Gentlemen Only Ladies Forbidden'? Or that 'rule of thumb' comes from an archaic legal principle that a man may chastise his wife, but only with a rod no thicker than his thumb? These and hundreds of other stories are commonly told and retold whenever people meet. They grow up in part because expressions are often genuinely mysterious. Why, for example, are satisfying meals 'square' rather than any other shape? And how did anyone ever come up with the idea that if you're competent at something you can 'cut the mustard'? Michael Quinion here retells many of the more bizarre tales, and explains their real origins where they're known. This is a fascinating treasure-trove of fiction and fact for anyone interested in language.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Michael Quinion has contributed to the Oxford Dictionary of New Words (2nd edition), edited the weekly Daily Telegraph new words column, and is author of a dictionary of affixes, Ologies and Isms (OUP). He has made countless contributions to the OED. Since 1996 he has produced the weekly e-newsletter World Wide Words, which has an associated website. He lives in Bristol.
‹  Zurück zur Artikelübersicht