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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 8. Juli 2000
I have owned my own business for years, and I disagree with virtually all of this book. While it has some snippets of good advice for women [don't be hesitant, apologetic or act unsure], it also had some ridiculous inconsistencies and stereotypes.
For example, Evans almost worships the way men do things, and portrays all women as incompetent at business, given their alleged stereotypical upbringing of playing with dolls and nurturing. She reinforces every negative stereotype about women. She discusses how men are naturally confident, and suggests that women pretend they are confident, even if they are not; however, in a later chapter, she says, "be yourself; be a woman; use your feminine wiles," because if you pretend, they will see through you. That's just not consistent advice.
She says women must appear serious about their work; but then later says it won't hurt your career to go off on the "Mommy track" for a few years. That is simply unrealistic in most companies.
In early chapters, she says women have to demand what they feel they deserve in the workplace just like men; yet, at the end of the book she contradicts this by grousing about how men can get away with things we women can't [they are allowed to get angry and be rude, fat and ugly; we absolutely cannot]. So which is it? Do we try to act like them; or like women; hard to tell from this rambling and inconsistent book.
Finally, the worst advice of all! She tells women they can contribute more to society and their careers by trying to work their way up in a large corporation, rather than leaving to start their own business, or by getting more fulfilling work at a smaller employer. This is preposterous. Even Ms. Evans is not at the top of the heap at CNN, and probably never will be. Her book is to justify her own choices.
As a woman who left a very successful career in a male-dominated field to start her own very successful business, I would recommend to women looking for career advice that, unless they want to spend their career working in the middle of a giant corporation, and being an employee all their life, don't bother reading this book.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
This book is pitched as one that is helpful for women. I am sure that is the case. Not being a woman, I have to share its benefits from my perspective.
I have been a mentor for many working women, and this book does a nice job of addressing the kinds of issues that the women have brought up with me as well as the ones that I have brought up with them. In the past, I have provided copies of How to Be a Star at Work as a way to assist these women. In the future, I will provide this book, as well.
Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman does an excellent job of explaining how relationships and results need to be balanced at work. That is a juggling act that seems to confuse many women, and I found this book to be accurate and constructive in this area.
Interestingly, I find that a lot of men miss these points, too. I would also recommend this book to male colleagues and subordinates, both to make them more effective and to improve their understanding of how to communicate with female colleagues.
Basically, the book is all about miscommunication and misconception stalls that occur at work, especially the ones that tend to occur among men and women. The book is very effective in exploring those stalls and inproviding sound advice for overcoming the same stalls.
The only weakness I found in the book is that some subtle points about business interactions were missed. A lot of male aggressiveness and bluffing was described as just being acceptable, while the same thing by women is unacceptable. What Ms. Evans missed is that there is usually a kind of kidding humor involved to let everyone know that the aggressor is simply indicating a strong desire to play, backed up by self-confidence. That takes the sting out of the aggressiveness. When some women are aggressive, they often forget to use the kidding humor that makes the aggressiveness tolerable to all.
Perhaps the greatest strength of the book is that it permits the reader to choose her/his own goals (and those may not be material success or power) while adapting the advice to one's own personality and preferences. Basically, any advice we get that suggest we act like the individuals we are is good advice. Well done, Ms. Evans!
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 19. Mai 2000
"Say it ain't so!" -- That's the thought that most often crossed my mind while I was reading this book. At times, I hated that she was right--that these were the rules you had to follow to really be a successful business woman. But, the truth is, the world for women business leaders is just as she describes it. Women ARE socialized differently. Women DO have different reactions to situation than men. Women DO view business goals and transactions differently. And, yes, women ARE held to a different standard than men. It is unfortunate, even stupid, but true.
How to read this book: Women should read this book to understand the playing field, to recognize potential minefields, and to answer questions like "why can't I wear a really short skirt to the Board Meeting? They already know I'm smart!"
Then, we should make it a point to change the rules. That's what getting the power is all about.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 1. August 2000
I was so excited about receiving this book and was very disappointed to read it's contents. It is the same old tired information once again that teaches women to act like men, except don't swear, don't laugh too loud, don't cry, basically don't act like a human being! I felt it told me to be something other than myself, which isn't to say I swear or cry on the job, I don't. However, I couldn't even finish this book because it depressed me too much. In addition, this material isn't even applicable in the Human Resources environment I work in and would probably get me fired!
There are MUCH better books available today on leadership and emotional intelligence that I would reccommend over this one.
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am 14. April 2000
I'm 28 years old and I suppose a little biased, I'm Gail's daughter. But the reason I wanted to review this book goes beyond my desire to have mommy become famous. Here's what I got from the book: Ask For It. I have this tendancy in work situations to be almost embarassed to ask my boss for a raise or a promotion, title change, new office, "insider" information, anything. After I read one of the first proofs of the book, I found myself making requests forcefully yet without being contentious or difficult. Guess what? They're happening. This book, in simple language, tells it like it is. There aren't all these fluffy chapters that put you to sleep and actually offer nothing of real substance, the book is filled with page after page of what works and what doesn't. But the thing that I think is so powerful about Play Like A Man, Win Like A Woman is that it puts the success of your career in your lap. NO more excuses, no one else is responsible for your successes but you. Her suggestions are never preachy but it's almost as if Gail has taken a flashlight and shown you areas that you weren't either looking at or noticing before. What you choose to do about that is all up to you. After reading the book I sort of involuntarily found myself "going for it" at work. I know that sounds cheesy but it's true. I'm a much more agressive businesswoman and the men that I work with pay attention to what I have to say and trust my ideas becuase I let myself take charge and don't get deflated when someone tells me "No." I used to sulk at that word, now I just hear it and don't take it so personally. I'm the Public Relations Manager for a very hip Internet company called eTour.com which has nothing to do with this review other than free publicity. Amazon better not delete that last sentence or else I'm crying editorial injustice. Buy mom's book. The men at CNN like her and the women do too and that's reason enough to listen to what she's got to say plus I'm a very grounded, successful, happy daughter. You go Gail!
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am 9. April 2000
If you are a woman and have ever needed a reason to stop taking everything everybody says or does personally, this book says it. This is the guidebook to business that baby-boomer-females-in-the-businessplace never had. Gail Evans has lived what she preaches and speaks in a language women can understand. I was shaking my head "yes" throughout the book, as I recognized my own situation and frustrations in workplace. I knew it had something to do with my gender, but other than pointing the finger of blame at all men, I could not pinpoint what was happening in this male-created domain. I guess I thought I was the only person (read woman) who couldn't figure out the rules for success in the workplace. I also needed to hear the words from a very successful woman who learned by doing. I learned that I can still be a woman, but succeed in the male-created, male-dominated business world, and not feel like an imposter...which is exactly what one of her chapters deals with. You don't have to be a sell-out, but quit taking everything so damn personal....this is business. This is not a book written by a man who thinks he knows what women are thinking. And, it is not a book written by a woman who is so well-connected, or glamorous and beautiful, that you would wonder how she could not be a success in the businessplace. This is a book written by "one of us", and concentrates on exactly why many women struggle so hard to succeed in her job, no matter what that job is. If you are a manager, or a clerk, or anything in between, this book will help you as a female. I am giving a copy of this book to every working woman that I know...with a few exceptions; those who have already figured out the rules. Now I know why they are so successful, and it has nothing to do with their luck and my unluckiness. I feel so much better and unburdened after reading this book. I am going to keep it at my bedside and use it as my affirmation support..."I will not personalize workplace issues...I will not.....".
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am 7. April 2000
Gail Evans openly sheds light on the dirty little secret in America's board rooms - and dares to take on the male-dominated corporate world where other women have kept quiet.
As a woman of the Generation called `X', this startling revelation comes just in time. Young women in the corporate world today have certainly benefitted from the struggle of our fore sisters and we revel in the relative equality afforded us by their braveness in the past.
But our equality perception is shortsighted if we believe that all progress has already been made and that we don't need to do anything about it.
As Evans shockingly points out, "women make up almost half of today's labor force but in corporate America they don't even share half the power and only four of the Fortune 500 CEO's are women". This is an abyssmal and disheartening realization especially for young women - and one which Evans' book lays out a daring strategy designed to overcome.
`Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman' reminds us that success in the business world IS about strategy. Because men have dominated the business world for so long - they have developed their own rules without the input of women. Evans clearly identifies these rules, makes us aware as women of their importance to operating in business- and then provides useful and practical advice on how women can diplomatically follow these rules and finesse them to our (READ: women) advantage.
`Play Like A Man, Win Like A Woman' is perfect for young women wondering what it takes to get to the top and how to do it - and in the process learn ways by which we can make our own strides in the fight for corporate equality.
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am 7. April 2000
Gail Evans openly sheds light on the dirty little secret in America's board rooms - and dares to take on the male-dominated corporate world where other women have kept quiet.
As a woman of the Generation called `X', this startling revelation comes just in time. Young women in the corporate world today have certainly benefitted from the struggle of our fore sisters and we revel in the relative equality afforded us by their braveness in the past.
But our equality perception is shortsighted if we believe that all progress has already been made and that we don't need to do anything about it.
As Evans shockingly points out, "women make up almost half of today's labor force but in corporate America they don't even share half the power and only four of the Fortune 500 CEO's are women". This is an abyssmal and disheartening realization especially for young women - and one which Evans' book lays out a daring strategy designed to overcome.
`Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman' reminds us that success in the business world IS about strategy. Because men have dominated the business world for so long - they have developed their own rules without the input of women. Evans clearly identifies these rules, makes us aware as women of their importance to operating in business- and then provides useful and practical advice on how women can diplomatically follow these rules and finesse them to our (READ: women) advantage.
`Play Like A Man, Win Like A Woman' is perfect for young women wondering what it takes to get to the top and how to do it - and in the process learn ways by which we can make our own strides in the fight for corporate equality.
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am 9. Mai 2000
The better points are that you go to work to make a salary, and not to be friends with everyone, and women need to stop saying "I'm sorry."
I'd have liked a bit more bite in this book, along the lines of: there is no such thing as loyalty to a job, that any loyalty goes to whoever pays the most money for the least amount of work, and if women have kids, they need to get them to daycare early enough to get to work on time, and for heavens sake, dry up the tears.
I don't understand that notion that at work a woman is always someone's wife, daughter, sister or mistress.
The funniest bit is the statement from Edelman Financial Services that an American mother should rake in $508,700 per year.
Who would pay this?
Play Like a Man is all right for a first book, even if it reads like something from the 1970s.
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am 7. Mai 2000
Ms. Evans' book "Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman" was a superficial treatment of the challenges women face in the world of work. Much of the advice she offers is repackaged advice such as one might have found in ten-year-old back issues of advice columns in "Working Woman" magazine. Her advice is often contradictory and may leave the reader more confused than enlightened. On the one hand Ms. Evans offers simplistic, pat solutions to gender-based misunderstandings, and in the next breath she allows that every situation is unique and that women must rely on their intuition. I purchased the book based on my interest in the interview she did with Larry King, but was disappointed to find that most of the best insights the book had to offer had been presented in the interview.
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