In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von Pink Brain, Blue Brain auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder mit einer unserer kostenlosen Kindle Lese-Apps sofort zu lesen anfangen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 

Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow Into Troublesome Gaps -- And What We Can Do About It [Kindle Edition]

Lise Eliot

Kindle-Preis: EUR 6,49 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Kostenlose Kindle-Leseanwendung Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.

Geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse oder Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 6,49  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 19,09  
Taschenbuch EUR 12,64  

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Read her masterful book and you'll never view the sex-differences debate the same way again." Newsweek "A refreshingly reasonable and reassuring look at recent alarming studies about sex differences in determining the behavior of children ... Eliot's work demonstrates a remarkable clarity of purpose." Publishers Weekly "This is an important book and highly recommended for parents, teachers, and anyone who works with children." Library Journal "[a] sharp, information-packed, and worderfully readable book" Mother Jones "A refreshingly reasonable and reassuring look at recent alarming studies about sex differences in determining the behavior of children ... Eliot's work demonstrates a remarkable clarity of purpose." Publishers Weekly "This is an important book and highly recommended for parents, teachers, and anyone who works with children." Library Journal "Read her masterful book and you'll never view the sex-differences debate the same way again." Newsweek "This meticulous book should challenge everyone's assumption about the role of sex and gender." Sue Blackmore BBC Focus "Gender is strongly affected by environment and stereotyping after all, [Eliot] maintains in this absorbing book." The Bookseller "A passionate plea for all of us to look beyond the confines of the pink/blue tyranny of childhood... To use the latest brain science to maximise outcomes for both genders, to the greater glorification of both." Culture (supplement to the Sunday Times) 10 out of 10 review: "it is difficult to see how Pink Brain, Blue Brain can become anything other than the definitive text on sex differences." The Times Higher Educational Supplement "She tells her story authoritatively but modestly, with frequent references to her experience as a mother, and illuminates a very accessible pathway through the science." Marek Kohn The Independent "She tells her story authoritatively but modestly, with frequent references to her experience as a mother, and illuminates a very accessible pathway through the science." Marek Kohn The Independent 10 out of 10 review: "it is difficult to see how Pink Brain, Blue Brain can become anything other than the definitive text on sex differences." The Times Higher Educational Supplement

Kurzbeschreibung

A precise scientific exploration of the differences between boys and girls that breaks down damaging gender stereotypes and offers practical guidance for parents and educators.

Over time, we've come to accept certain ideas about the differences between males and females—that boys can't focus in a classroom, for instance, and that girls are obsessed with relationships. In Pink Brain, Blue Brain, neuroscientist Lise Eliot turns that thinking on its head. Calling on years of exhaustive research and her own work in the field of neuroplasticity, Eliot argues that infant brains are so malleable that small differences at birth become amplified over time, as parents and teachers—and the culture at large—unwittingly reinforce gender stereotypes. Children themselves intensify the differences by playing to their modest strengths. They constantly exercise those “ball-throwing” or “doll-cuddling” circuits, rarely straying from their comfort zones. But this, says Eliot, is just what they need to do, and she offers parents and teachers concrete ways to help. Boys are not, in fact, “better at math” but at certain kinds of spatial reasoning. Girls are not naturally more empathetic; they’re allowed to express their feelings. By appreciating how sex differences emerge—rather than assuming them to be fixed biological facts—we can help all children reach their fullest potential, close the troubling gaps between boys and girls, and ultimately end the gender wars that currently divide us.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 3386 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 434 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 1851687998
  • Verlag: Mariner Books; Auflage: Reprint (2. September 2009)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0046A9MN6
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #279.448 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  56 Rezensionen
112 von 130 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen not for everyone 7. August 2009
Von Silea - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
There are a lot of reasons i should like this book: I'm a math/science/tech-oriented woman, I have an undergraduate degree in psychology, I have an infant son, I've never been terribly girly, etc. Despite all of this, and a habit of reading academic and semi-academic texts, i struggled through this book.

The one thing that really sticks with me after finishing the book is a feeling that the author spent an awful lot more time pointing out studies that have been disproved or discredited, rather than making any positive arguments or citing any validated results. It becomes almost formulaic: she'll discuss a study in some length, including the methods, the results, and the implications, and then pontificate on how this explains observational or anecdotal information. Then she'll tell you that no further studies duplicated the results, so it's all just back to square one. I do appreciate that this is how science goes sometimes, but it's an awfully long book just to say that precious few studies have shown anything at all worth believing.

A lesser complaint is that the author seemed to have trouble deciding what kind of book she was writing. At times, it was a moderately dense scholarly work, with studies and statistics and name-dropping. Other times, it's pure anecdotal accounts, suggesting a vastly less academic target audience. There were also numerous references to her own children, done in such a way as to make it seem briefly like a memoir instead of research.

There are some things i did like about this book. First, the organization. Rather than just being a heap of studies and discussion thereof, it's parsed into age groups. While this does mean that she has to refer back to previous chapters when discussing studies of similar foci but in different age groups, there are demonstrated trends in the level of gender-exclusive behavior based on age, and it does make a great deal of sense to do it this way. Second, at the end of each chapter she includes a list of how to address the topics brought up thus far. For example, at the end of the girls-score-lower-than-boys-on-math-tests chapter, she has an extensive and well-explicated list of tasks and activities for parents to do with their daughters to help mediate the problem. The caveat here is that there's very little to indicate that any of her suggestions will work, but none of them could do much harm either, so if you're concerned about the topic of the chapter, it's probably worthwhile.

In all, i probably wouldn't recommend this book to most people. As much as the author does try to keep the technobabble in the background, there's sufficient academic taint to probably be off-putting to some. Likewise, for people simply curious about the gender gaps but without young children of their own, this book may be a little too practical and a little too casual. But if you, like i, have a strong interest in this subject, and a small child whom you're trying to nurture into a well-rounded adult, it's probably worth the time and effort.
35 von 40 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen interesting, fact-based information on male and female brains 31. August 2009
Von Suzanne Fisher - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Pink Brain, Blue Brain is fascinating. Lise Eliot uses her knowledge and expertise as a neuroscientist to explain to us that we might be relying too much on pseudo-science in the media to inform us of how things really are in regards to boys and girls. We are bombarded not only with pseudo-science, but with actual science that is not explained fully, such as studies on rats, studies on adult brains (who's to say that adult brains developed the way they were based soley on biology?), and studies on children who have been influenced already.

Eliot emphasizes we can't make cut-and-dry declarations about human male and female brains unless we go into fetal studies or newborn studies, which are few and far between. Besides the interesting discussion of science, at the end of each chapter Eliot lists a few things parents and teachers can do to make sure children can live up to their capabilities. The chapters are divided easily into age groups. This book is very helpful to anyone interested in the differences between males and females and wanting a little more scientific oomph than screaming headlines.

***************************

I have to add to this review. This book is not a difficult read if taken in little steps as I did. I wouldn't try to sit down and read it through; it's about neuroscience and includes lots of information and data. The author's point is that we shouldn't believe everything we're told about male and female brains, not without understanding how that data was acquired.
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen What color is your brain? 26. Juli 2009
Von Lynette R. Fleming - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
On the first day of school in 1967 I walked into my chemistry class excited about the challenge of what I knew would be a difficult course. Once we had settled in our seats, our teacher introduced himself. Looking around the class, he said "I don't know what all you girls are doing in here." His wife was the home-ec teacher at our school, and he made it quite apparent that he thought all of us "girls" should be in her class, not his. As I expected, it was a difficult class. Without the mentoring of a teacher who believed in me, I squeaked by with a B- average in the course, my lowest grade in high school. It was obvious to me that I should not select a career which required an aptitude for science. I began college as an English major, preparing to teach my favorite subject.

Now fast forward 42 years. Today no chemistry teacher would dare to make that kind of boldly sexist statement. However, many well-educated people still believe that boys have a natural edge in math and science, and treat their female daughters or students accordingly. While Dr. Eliot tells us there are subtle differences in the brains of girls and boys, these differences are magnified through "plasticity", a term used to describe the fact that the brain changes in response to its own experience. So parents who buy dolls for little girls and Lego's for little boys are offering experiences which will later help to mold each child's brain.

Perhaps it is time for your children to select a college and career. Just as I did so many years ago, most girls gravitate toward what comes easiest to them and away from technical and quantitative fields. Dr. Eliot tell us that "While reading and writing are important, math has a special place - what some call the critical filter - that determines who can advance to higher-paying and more prestigious jobs." It is fact that math and science are where the money is. Many more women are capable of going into fields requiring these skills than actually do. And we wonder why women still earn less than eighty cents for every dollar earned by men.

All of this is beginning to change as we expect our girls to be more like boys. Girls have soared in response to sports, math, science, and leadership training. The proportion of women majoring in accounting and veterinary medicine has grown from a mere 8 or 9 percent in 1970 to 61 percent in accounting and 74 percent in veterinary medicine. In sharp contrast, women comprise only 20 percent of engineering students and a slightly higher percentage of computer science graduates.

Interestingly, 100 years ago only 20% of college students were women. Take my mom, for example. She is 79 years old and was the salutatorian of her high school class. While she loved learning, there was no money in the family budget for a daughter to go to college. Today mom is the computer "guru" of her "assisted living" community. If anyone, male or female, is having computer problems they know who to call. Hearing about her expertise, the local community college even asked her to teach a computer class for seniors. This woman, steered away from the benefit of a college education, made sure it was offered to and expected of her own daughters. From the time I could say "college", I knew I was going there.

Today the tables have turned 360°. It is our boys we are more worried about ... will they be kicked out of preschool or be unable to attend the college of their choice? Will they fail to launch and continue to live with us well into their adult lives? Girls are surging ahead, making boys appear to be failing. As it turns out, boys' reading, writing, and math scores are on the rise, their dropout rates are down, and more men are going to college, although their percentage of the total college population has declined. So while our concern for the success of our boys has risen, they actually are getting better educated but are left in the shadow of our girls' dramatic improvement.

Parents and educators can help change the challenges our children face because of their sex, and Dr. Eliot explains how step by step. From tips for promoting boys' language and literacy skills, to tips for encouraging our girls to stick with a more rigorous, quantitative curriculum, this book covers it all ... how we can help each brain inside each child become the best that it can be. Each new baby should be delivered with this book ... a manual to help your child achieve his/her full potential. And, of course, it should be required reading for every guidance counselor and teacher. We aren't just made with pink brains or blue brains ... our brains are molded by our life experiences.
12 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good book - but its technical/scientific 11. Oktober 2009
Von Toodles! - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
I was a little torn with how to rate this book. I give it just 4 stars out of 5 because I expected a book that was generally "for parents" and not for the medical/psychology area. On the back of the book it states "And she offers parents and teachers concrete ways to help. Presenting the latest science regarding development from birth to puberty, ..." I zeroed in on the first part - "parents". However, the latter part is more true, she focuses a lot on science. However, I love research and analyzing, so I feel this book was helpful.

Pros:
* Makes footnotes available on the page when needed - this is helpful to expand on the thought or background.
* This is research based and not just what she feels like or pulls out of a hat (although I do believe you can get enough research material to build a case any way you want)
* @ 83 pages of Notes and Bibliography at the end. I love this! If I want more information, I feel like I could dig further if I wanted to.
* Fairly easy to pick up and jump in at various points - you don't have to read cover to cover.

Cons:
* 18 pages of introduction - just get to the point
* seems to linger on topics and points to various research - just make the point
* this seems more technical than I thought it was going to be when I selected the book. I bet it could be even more technical if she wanted it to be - its at least readable for those of us not in Science/Medicine.

My recommendation: It depends. If you like details/analytics - go for it. If you are looking for an easy-to-read Parent book - this is not for you.

about me: female w/ business and IT master degrees and twin toddlers.
14 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting information, but it has some structural issues 27. August 2009
Von Tethys - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
I am a geologist, but I found that I was familiar with most of the research presented in the book, because I have read about endocrine disrupters in several books in the past. I was, therefore, a little disappointed that very little research progress seems to have been made over the past 5 yrs since I looked into the subject. And while I appreciate the fact that she did go through the details of some of that previous research and explain why the results were good or bad, I felt it made the book a bit tedious at times. I understand that she was trying to be fair and balanced by presenting all of the research done and discussing all of it in detail. This is a scientist's way of handling a controversial issue.
However, I disagree with other reviewers that including these studies and discussion of them is pointless. I was recently diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome and I had read several articles that linked it to Simon Baron-Cohen's extreme male brain hypothesis. I don't feel that I have an extremely male brain, just one that is organized a bit differently than other people, so I already had questions about this hypothesis and found her discussion of his research very useful in understanding that there is no official documentation of this hypothesis.
That said, I think that for the average person there is too much information on the science side and no enough on the tools you can implement side. If this book is really geared toward teachers and parents, then I think the science could have been presented in a more accessible way. I think it would have been more useful if she had discussed a few articles that lead to a specific point (e.g. we can teach girls spatial skills or give them more confidence about their math abilities) and then discuss in detail what parents and teachers can do to encourage development in relationship to that point. I think the problem is that the in-depth discussions are designed to have her work stand up to scientific scrutiny and the tips are designed for parents, so there is no central structure and point of view to the book.
Despite this criticism, I do feel that a lot of the information is useful for both parents and teachers, but it might be better to look at the tips for each age and then work your way back into the research part of the book if you want to know why that was her conclusion.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden