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am 30. Juni 2000
If you are a Jane Austen fan, as I am, you will surely enjoy Persuasion. The basic premise is about a young woman who was persuaded to let the love of her life get away, but now he has come back and she's wondering if she still has a chance. Books from this era accurately reflect how actions of individuals were always to be moderate and proper. Nowadays there would be no reason for this book because more likely than not the individuals involved would simply confront each other with questions to find out how the other felt. But back then being so forward was unheard of. So what we have here is a book filled with sexual/romantic tensions that makes for a very exciting read. Jane Austen's biggest flaw, in my opinion, is not milking the climax of her stories for all they're worth. When you reach the scenes in her books that everything has been leading up to, they are always brushed over with scant details and little actual dialogue so that you can't really feel what took place. A bonus about the Austen novels is that they are not so long that it is intimidating just to open them. Overall I would rate this as the best Austen book.
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am 7. Juni 2000
Austen's novels are characterized by their limited plot and their freedom from deep philosophical musings, complicated image patterns and symbolism. As a result the reader is presented with a skilfully crafted novel in which setting, character delineation, acute observation of social interaction, accuracy and realism are all very important. The early novels were characterized by the use of irony, humour and satire. These are much less evident in Persuasion, as Austen seemed more concerned with the sympathetic and sensitive expoloration of her heroine's character and situation. Persuasion is a simply structured novel, for its plot is concerned only with bringing Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth together. A major theme of the novel is Austen's examination of pride and vanity - pride in one's social position and vanity of one's personal appearance. The idea of persuadability is tied up with another major concern of the novel - the right quality of mind. As the novel develops, Austen strives to achieve a right balance between contrasting opposites. I started to read the book reluctantly (as it was for school); but when I was familiar with the characters and the language, it was very enjoyable. If you have ever been in love, or thought yourself to be, or even had a crush on someone; you will identify with Anne Elliot's behaviour when she is around Captain Wentworth. It was amazing how real the characters came to be, and the events which occured can be compared of those today. I recommend the book to anyone with an interest in love stories. It was the first Austen book I have read, and it will not be the last.
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am 29. Juni 2001
...aber mein persönliches Lieblingsbuch von Jane Austen. Die Geschichte um Anne Elliot ist einfach herzergreifend. Sie ist so herrlich geschrieben, dass man während des Lesens förmlich mitzittert, ob sich die beiden doch nun endlich ihre, seit Jahren schwellende Liebe eingestehen und zueinander finden werden. Stattdessen versuchen beide so gleichgültig und abweisend wie es nur eben geht zu tun, sobald der andere mal einen kleinen Schritt nach vorn wagt. Es gibt übrigens auch eine sehr gute englische TV-Verfilmung dieses Buches.
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am 4. Januar 2003
Ein tolles Werk Austens,ihr letztes, obwohl es nicht ganz an Austens frühere Werke heranreicht.
Die Geschichte handelt von Anne, die von ihrer Familie überredet wurde, sich von ihrer Verlobung mit Frederic Wentworth, der gesellschaftlich unter ihr steht, zu lösen.
Jahre später sieht sie ihn wieder, er hat inzwischen als Captain Karriere gemacht und ist nun bei den Frauen ziemlich begehrt. Anne verliebt sich wieder in ihn doch sie ist sich seiner Zuneigung nicht sicher...
Jane Austen hat es ein weiteres mal geschafft, einen netten, unterhaltsamen Roman zu schreiben. Zwar fehlt etwas die Spannung, trotzdem ist es sehr unterhaltsam und nett zu lesen!
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am 13. Mai 2000
Jane Austen is often noted for her earlier works, namely Pride and Prejudice. Her later books are sometimes passed up, yet they can prove to be quite an enjoyable read.
Anne Elliot, a wealthy, yet amazingly kind girl, finds herself in love with a penniless gambler who is making his profession as a sea captain. He proposes. She allows her friends to "persuade" her that this poor captain is not the man for her. He leaves, heartbroken, and over time becomes a wealthy man. He returns eight years later and Anne realizes that she never quite got over the man who stole her heart so many years ago. However, Captain Wentworth seems fairly content without her. Her shyness keeps the debonair captain from ever knowing her true feelings, but like any good Austen novel, the good girl always wins. Anne isn't as impetuous as Elizabeth Bennett, but her sweet nature will keep you rooting for her. Read and enjoy!
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am 8. Juni 2001
... aber trotzdem sehr schön zu lesen. Die Heldin dieses Buches, Anne Eliott, bricht in ihrer Jugend auf den Rat ihrer Familie und einer Freundin (Persuasion!) ein Verlöbnis mit einem Mann, den sie sehr liebt, weil er weder Geld noch "Ruhm" besitzt. Jahre später trifft sie ihn wieder, er ist inzwischen wohlhabend geworden, ihr Vater hingegen verarmt. Beide begegnen sich mit großer Scheu, versuchen, möglichst jeden Kontakt zu vermeiden. Dies ist jedoch kaum mehr möglich, als er eine Bekanntschaft mit der Familie ihres Schwagers eingeht, sich in eine Schwester dieses Schwagers verliebt und diese sogar zu heiraten gedenkt...
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TOP 500 REZENSENTam 22. Februar 2008
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
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am 20. Juli 2003
Was soll ich noch sagen: Ich liebe Jane Austen. "Persuasion" ist zwar nicht mein absoluter Liebling (das bleibt P&P), aber trotzdem wunderbar und immer wieder wert, gelesen zu werden. Die Heldin Anne ist ganz anders als die anderen Austen-Heldinnen, sehr ruhig, zurückgenommen, am Anfang des Buches schon sitzengebliebene Jungfer. Aber dann kehrt ihre Jugendliebe Captain Wentworth zurück, jetzt angesehen und wohlhabend. Anne hatte die Verlobung auf Anraten ihrer mütterlichen Freundin gelöst, doch Wentworth nie vergessen. Wie bei Austen zu erwarten, nimmt natürlich alles sein gutes Ende.
Wie immer bei Austen sind die Charakterisierungen und der sichere Blick für die Schwächen (und Stärken) der handelnden Personen und auch der Schreibstil selbst eine wahre Freude. Diese späte Werk ist nicht so frisch und spritzig wie die früheren Romane, gewinnt aber gerade aus seiner Ruhe und der Darstellung eines späteren Glückes seinen Reiz.
Es gibt auch hier eine sehr schöne Verfilmung von der BBC: "Jane Austens Verführung", die ab und zu im Nachtprogramm läuft und die ebenfalls sehr empfehlenswert ist.
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TOP 500 REZENSENTam 22. Februar 2008
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
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TOP 500 REZENSENTam 22. Februar 2008
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
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