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am 25. Januar 2015
Das Buch ist ein muss für alle die mehr von Leben und Menschen verstehen wollen.
Ausgezeichnet geschriebene Fabel, die man in einem Atemzug ließt, und ich glaube, nie vergisst.
Gehört in jeden Bücherschrank, man wird dieses Buch immer wieder lesen oder blättern wollen.
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am 31. Dezember 2013
Hier werden die Phasen eines "Changes" im Rahmen einer Fabel sehr anschaulich dargestellt. Man merkt gar nicht, dass man beim Lesen dieser Geschichte "eine Lektion für's Leben" lernt. Sehr gut.
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My favorite part of John Kotter's classic, Leading Change, is the cover image of a penguin leaping across a space between two blocks of ice while 10 other penguins look on from the side the penguin leaped from. Here is one case where you can tell the book by its cover.

Obviously, that wonderful image penetrated deeply into the consciousness of Holger Rathgeber in designing this penguin-based version of how a leader might deal with the problem in Who Moved My Cheese? (changing conditions affect survival)? If you miss that connection to Who Moved My Cheese? there's a foreword by Spencer Johnson to make it clearer.

The Emperor Penguins have lived on an iceberg in Antarctica for many years. They planned to always live there. But Fred had a different idea: The iceberg was melting in a way that meant the possibility of a catastrophic collapse in mid-Winter. The rest of the book explores how Fred's knowledge is translated into useful action for the 268 penguins that lived in the colony.

The fable naturally draws on John Kotter's famous eight steps for leading change which I have paraphrased below into seven to make them easier to understand:

1. Get peoples' attention.

2. Establish a change-leading team.

3. Agree on the results you want.

4. Allow needed changes.

5. Show regular progress.

6. Stay focused.

7. Build new habits that will serve you well after the change is done.

Fables are difficult to write. I admire John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber for taking a crack at it.

But if you pay attention to the facts, you'll find that their story doesn't quite make sense. Emperor Penguins live on the pack ice that forms seasonally. As the pack ice retreats, they simply move to the edge. Seldom would they stay on an iceberg. Why? Because the ice breaks up when the youngsters are old enough to swim to the main ice pack. If you read science articles, you'll also learn that what is more likely to threaten a penguin community is that their iceberg drifts into an area where the winter freeze isolates the colony too far from the open sea. The penguins have to walk to the sea rather than dive in to get food.

Also, most icebergs are going to eventually release into warmer seas and melt that way rather than be split by freezing water as described in this book.

If you look at the leadership, it's also very male dominated. The story would be more realistic if it included more male-female interaction.

The problem of survival in the face of the environment seems more akin to what a town council might face in deciding to relocate away from a leaking dam that what a business organization might face.

I could go on, but I'm sure you see the point: A better fable could have been written (even if it had to involve penguins).

I also compared the book to Leading Change and The Heart of Change. Unless you are only able to learn by reading fables, both of those books are much better on this subject.

My suggestion is that you let the iceberg melt and read about how people lead instead in Dr. Kotter's other excellent books.
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 15. September 2006
Eine Fabel wird erzählt und diese Geschichte regt zum wirklichen Nachdenken an!

Es geht um liebe, nette Pinguine, die mit all ihren kleinen und großen Macken auf einem Eisberg leben. Einer der Pinguine entdeckt, dass sich der Eisberg verändert und seine Schlussfolgerung nach einigem Nachdenken ist, dass der Eisberg für die kommenden Winterstürme nicht mehr sicher ist. Er wendet sich an den Rat der Pinguinkolonie und wird gehört. Aber, wie nicht anders zu erwarten, gehen die Meinungen auseinander.

Was folgt, hat mit Pinguinen nicht wirklich etwas zu tun, sondern spiegelt unser eigenes Leben und den Umgang mit Veränderungen wider. So wird zunächst versucht, die unangenehme Wahrheit zu verleugnen, dann bildet sich eine Arbeitsgruppe (typisch divers nach neuesten Managementvorstellungen), man brainstormt ausgiebig, exploriert ganz neue Ideen und verabschiedet einen Actionplan. Mit viel Aufwand wird der geliebte Eisberg verlassen und die Pinguine fangen an, ihr neues Leben und ihr neues Umfeld viel besser zu finden als den alten Eisberg.

Fazit : diese Fabel, in einfachstem Englisch geschrieben, enthält ALLES, was der Chance-Management-Papst John Kotter bereithält. Ein super Buch, empfehlenswert für jedermann!

Gut zu wissen, dass im Land von Dschordsch Dabbeljuh auch noch Gutes produziert wird. Very strong buy!
0Kommentar| 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. Februar 2007
Kotter and Rathgeber team up to tell the story of a colony of penguins who have to face a life-threatening situation: their iceberg is at danger of melting, as one of them - Fred - finds out. It is wonderful to follow their ideas, fears and actions. Beyond being "just" an endearing story, "our iceberg" underlines all the important things that managers need to pay attention to, when caught up in a difficult business situation that requires everyone to change. Being a fable, the story allows for both: seeing things at a distance and yet at the same you are likely to find your co-workers or yourself represented by one of the many penguin characters. Therefore: five stars for telling a not really new story in a totally new and refreshing way. 1 1/2 hours (which is all it takes to read the book) well spend.
0Kommentar| Eine Person fand diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
My favorite part of John Kotter's classic, Leading Change, is the cover image of a penguin leaping across a space between two blocks of ice while 10 other penguins look on from the side the penguin leaped from. Here is one case where you can tell the book by its cover.

Obviously, that wonderful image penetrated deeply into the consciousness of Holger Rathgeber in designing this penguin-based version of how a leader might deal with the problem in Who Moved My Cheese? (changing conditions affect survival)? If you miss that connection to Who Moved My Cheese? there's a foreword by Spencer Johnson to make it clearer.

The Emperor Penguins have lived on an iceberg in Antarctica for many years. They planned to always live there. But Fred had a different idea: The iceberg was melting in a way that meant the possibility of a catastrophic collapse in mid-Winter. The rest of the book explores how Fred's knowledge is translated into useful action for the 268 penguins that lived in the colony.

The fable naturally draws on John Kotter's famous eight steps for leading change which I have paraphrased below into seven to make them easier to understand:

1. Get peoples' attention.

2. Establish a change-leading team.

3. Agree on the results you want.

4. Allow needed changes.

5. Show regular progress.

6. Stay focused.

7. Build new habits that will serve you well after the change is done.

Fables are difficult to write. I admire John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber for taking a crack at it.

But if you pay attention to the facts, you'll find that their story doesn't quite make sense. Emperor Penguins live on the pack ice that forms seasonally. As the pack ice retreats, they simply move to the edge. Seldom would they stay on an iceberg. Why? Because the ice breaks up when the youngsters are old enough to swim to the main ice pack. If you read science articles, you'll also learn that what is more likely to threaten a penguin community is that their iceberg drifts into an area where the winter freeze isolates the colony too far from the open sea. The penguins have to walk to the sea rather than dive in to get food.

Also, most icebergs are going to eventually release into warmer seas and melt that way rather than be split by freezing water as described in this book.

If you look at the leadership, it's also very male dominated. The story would be more realistic if it included more male-female interaction.

The problem of survival in the face of the environment seems more akin to what a town council might face in deciding to relocate away from a leaking dam that what a business organization might face.

I could go on, but I'm sure you see the point: A better fable could have been written (even if it had to involve penguins).

I also compared the book to Leading Change and The Heart of Change. Unless you are only able to learn by reading fables, both of those books are much better on this subject.

My suggestion is that you let the iceberg melt and read about how people lead instead in Dr. Kotter's other excellent books.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
My favorite part of John Kotter's classic, Leading Change, is the cover image of a penguin leaping across a space between two blocks of ice while 10 other penguins look on from the side the penguin leaped from. Here is one case where you can tell the book by its cover.

Obviously, that wonderful image penetrated deeply into the consciousness of Holger Rathgeber in designing this penguin-based version of how a leader might deal with the problem in Who Moved My Cheese? (changing conditions affect survival)? If you miss that connection to Who Moved My Cheese? there's a foreword by Spencer Johnson to make it clearer.

The Emperor Penguins have lived on an iceberg in Antarctica for many years. They planned to always live there. But Fred had a different idea: The iceberg was melting in a way that meant the possibility of a catastrophic collapse in mid-Winter. The rest of the book explores how Fred's knowledge is translated into useful action for the 268 penguins that lived in the colony.

The fable naturally draws on John Kotter's famous eight steps for leading change which I have paraphrased below into seven to make them easier to understand:

1. Get peoples' attention.

2. Establish a change-leading team.

3. Agree on the results you want.

4. Allow needed changes.

5. Show regular progress.

6. Stay focused.

7. Build new habits that will serve you well after the change is done.

Fables are difficult to write. I admire John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber for taking a crack at it.

But if you pay attention to the facts, you'll find that their story doesn't quite make sense. Emperor Penguins live on the pack ice that forms seasonally. As the pack ice retreats, they simply move to the edge. Seldom would they stay on an iceberg. Why? Because the ice breaks up when the youngsters are old enough to swim to the main ice pack. If you read science articles, you'll also learn that what is more likely to threaten a penguin community is that their iceberg drifts into an area where the winter freeze isolates the colony too far from the open sea. The penguins have to walk to the sea rather than dive in to get food.

Also, most icebergs are going to eventually release into warmer seas and melt that way rather than be split by freezing water as described in this book.

If you look at the leadership, it's also very male dominated. The story would be more realistic if it included more male-female interaction.

The problem of survival in the face of the environment seems more akin to what a town council might face in deciding to relocate away from a leaking dam that what a business organization might face.

I could go on, but I'm sure you see the point: A better fable could have been written (even if it had to involve penguins).

I also compared the book to Leading Change and The Heart of Change. Unless you are only able to learn by reading fables, both of those books are much better on this subject.

My suggestion is that you let the iceberg melt and read about how people lead instead in Dr. Kotter's other excellent books.
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 25. April 2013
A book out of the odd if it comes to change management. Easily written and understandable for everybody.
This book gives you an idea, how change management can be done by using a language everybody does understand.
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am 15. September 2011
We had to read this book before we went to a training about "Leading change".

It's very easy to understand and it explains the different steps in change quite well.

I will read more from this author in the future.
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am 22. September 2014
Ein tolles Buch mit wunderschönen Illustrationen und doch wird Change und das Change Management treffend dargestellt. Wirklich sehr gut gemacht!
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