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Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Revolution (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 22. Februar 1999


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 296 Seiten
  • Verlag: O'Reilly & Associates; Auflage: 1 (22. Februar 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1565925823
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565925823
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 17,8 x 1,8 x 23,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (17 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 330.670 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Open Sources: Voices from the Open Source Revolution is a fascinating look at the raging debate that is its namesake. Filled with writings from the central players--from Linux creator Linus Torvalds to Perl creator Larry Wall--the book convinces the reader of the overwhelming merits of freeing up the many iterations of software's source code.

The open-source movement has become a cause célèbre in light of the widespread adoption of Linux, Perl, and Apache as well as its corporate support from Netscape, IBM, and Oracle--and strongly felt opposition from Microsoft. Open Sources doesn't address why these Microsoft foes are throwing their weight behind the movement. Instead, it focuses on the history and philosophy of open-source software (previously referred to as freeware) as an argument for shaping the future of programming. Open Sources is much larger than just a fight with any one company. Instead, it is a revolutionary call to release software development from the vested interests that label new directions in software development as threatening.

This is not to say that opening the source code is an entirely egalitarian and communistic endeavor. These are programmers and startup owners; they want to be able to continue to program for a living. To that end, Open Sources contains strong business profiles from entrepreneurs such as Apache's--and now, O'Reilly & Associates'--Brian Behlendorf, who discusses how to give away software in order to lure customers in for specialized versions. In many ways, this is a hands-on guide, displaying an insider's view of the development process and providing specifics on testing details and altering licensing agreements. However, interspersed with tech talk is a reader-friendly guide for those interested in the future of software development. --Jennifer Buckendorff

Synopsis

Freely available source code, with contributions from thousands of programmers around the world: this is the spirit of the software revolution known as Open Source. In this text, leaders of Open Source come together to discuss the new vision of the software industry they have created, through essays that explain how the movement works, why it succeeds, and where it is going.

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Kundenrezensionen

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von "regehr" am 8. Juni 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Open Sources is a collection of essays by people who have been involved in a prominent way in what is being called "the open source revolution." The authors are all very bright people with good intentions and diverse viewpoints; this makes for interesting reading. However, I had a problem with the introduction. In fact, I hated it. It attempts to couch the issue of free vs. non-free software in religious terms: in the bad old days, free software only came from universities or other government-funded research. Then, a few companies saw the light and began to open-source their software; currently the industry is divided between these companies (the saved) and the rest of the companies (the damned) who will spiral into oblivion due to their proprietary selfishness. I thought the presence of this sort of rhetoric in the introduction, which sets the tone for the rest of the book, was particularly unfortunate.
The essays in Open Sources are a mixed bag. Kirk McKusick's history of Berkeley UNIX is great, as is Michael Tiemann's history of Cygnus Solutions, RMS's article about the GNU project, and Bruce Perens' article about licensing issues. Also, I really enjoyed the transcript of the infamous 1992 flame war between Linus and Andy Tanenbaum about the merits of Linux vs. Minix. On the other hand, Paul Vixie's article about software engineering is pretty random, Larry Wall's article does not seem to have a point at all, and Eric Raymond's
second article and Tom Paquin's account of the open-sourcing of Netscape are too self-serving to be useful.
Overall, I enjoyed this book quite a bit.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Michael Boudreau am 15. April 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
I agree with many of the reviewers below that this book was helpful and often interesting. It gives a readable orientation to one of the most important movements in the software industry today, and the editors have been fortunate to gather together so many contributors who obviously know whereof they speak. In particular, the editors' Introduction, Eric Raymond's "Brief History of Hackerdom," Richard Stallman's account of GNU and FSF, Bruce Perens's discussion of Open Source, and Tim O'Reilly's essay on "Infoware" were informative and thought-provoking.
That said, it should be noted that the Amazon reviewer above gets it wrong when she writes that the book gives a "fascinating look at the raging debate." In fact, *nothing* about Open Source is debated in this book, which is a major disappointment. As the reviewer from Princeton below notes, the goodness of everything Open Source and the badness of everything Microsoft seems to be a given for many of the writers. At the risk of criticizing the book for not being something its creators didn't intend, I think it would be greatly improved with the addition of a wider range of viewpoints and even a dissenting voice or two. (There are a number of essays that could give place to some alternate content: Eric Raymond's second essay, "The Revenge of the Hackers," leans heavily toward the self-congratulatory, as does the Netscape cheerleaders' "Story of Mozilla." And Larry Wall's "Diligence, Patience, and Humility" seems to have been included not on its own merits but on the author's reputation as the Perl Deity.)
A final wish is for the book to address a broader range of readers.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von abonnema@sp-plus.nl am 11. Juli 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
It's general background and overview material and even if you don't like all articles (I disliked the one by Larry Wall, sorry, Larry, I do like Perl), it's a definite buy for people interested in software development methods in general or free software development in particular.
Mind you, it's not a scientific or very theoretical book, but it does have some opinions and theories in it (Richard Stallman, Eric Raymond, Bruce Perens, Tim O'Reilly).
So, if you like theory on software development, it's a definite buy. If you're a hacker already, well maybe, but you might already know parts of it.
Finally, there is definitely some anti-MS sentiment in there. However maybe it's just anti-baddd-software. Anyway, just so you know....
As far as I am concerned: buy, buy, BUY!
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"SW development method" does not quite convey the story here. It is a culture that is blossoming. Think of it: for so long brillian unsung heroes have contributed so much to our software progress only to have corporate bigwigs like Microsoft get all the credit; for so long proprietary software has had stifled innovation just in the way that proprietary hardware did; and for so long, competition has been stifled in a vital area of our economy by a dangerous monopoly which has resulted in the present crisis. Out comes the open source movement, revenge of the hackers as Eric Raymond would say, to set things right. New economics are upon us here, and this book is a lively and well-rounded perspective on this. Hopefully, however, it should be followed up by regular checks on the Net of the leaders who contributed. Already some important writings have been announced since this book was published. I should add here, however, that most of the material in the book I have never encountered on the Net before, so please read the book!
BTW, a previous Amazon reviewer was really down on the book because it heavily criticizes Microsoft and it assumes some background knowledge in business and software. These are unfounded claims: I have no clue about business but was easily able to figure out the *tiny* amount of specific jargon from context. Likewise, I think any intelligent person could do the same with the technology presented here. When it does get a little more technical the publisher put that material in a separate appendix in the back.
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