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Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 13. August 2012


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Pressestimmen

"[Pekar's] message here is important--that a good Jew asks tough questions, that a history of oppression requires us to be more conscious of the oppressed." --David L. Ulin, "Los Angeles Times ""This posthumous publication reflects the seminal graphic memoirist at his edgy best." --"Kirkus" (starred review) "[T]his posthumous work by Pekar functions as a multipronged exploration of religious, political, and personal histories and is all the richer for it . . . A sweet and simple epilogue by Pekar's widow, Joyce Brabner, provides the perfect capstone." --"Publishers Weekly ""This is not only Pekar's greatest work, but probably the most powerful use of his talent for plainly speaking truth to power and ignorance. JT Waldman masterfully captures the wry innocence of Harvey's interrogation while still celebrating the subtle contours of modern American Jewishness." --Douglas Rushkoff, author of "Life Inc." and "Program or Be Programmed ""A fascinating history of the so-called Promised Land--as seen through the eyes of an estranged Jew from Cleveland. Brimming with classic Pekar asides and details, the book sheds light on a subject often obscured by heat. JT Waldman's evocative artwork combines down-to-earth "American Splendor"-style illustrations with motifs inspired by everything from mythology and Islamic art to illuminated manuscripts and Chagall. I never got to say goodbye to Harvey, but reading this book was like having a final conversation with him." --Josh Neufeld, "American Splendor" artist, and author and artist of "A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge ""Pekar peppers accounts of perpetual persecution with poignant autobiographical anecdotes in this concise, compelling, and sure-to-be controversial graphic history of the Jewish people and the state of Israel. JT Waldman's art, juxtaposing realism with ancient styles, rocking exquisite mosaics and elaborate medieval and Middle Eastern design flourishes, is nothing less than a majestic tour de Schwartz." --Jeff Newelt, "Heeb" Magazine comics editor, and editor of Harvey Pekar's "Cleveland """Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me" is Harvey Pekar's final exploration of his conflict over the history of Israel, as illuminated by JT Waldman's protean art. This is their Jewish Book of Hours." --Dean Haspiel, artist of "The Quitter" and "Cuba: My Revolution ""One part history lesson, one part autobiography, and all Harvey Pekar, "Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me" is an insightful look at one of the burning topics of our time. With Pekar's scholarship and humor and JT Waldman's stylistically varied art, this graphic book is visually entertaining and highly informative." --Peter Kuper, artist of "The Metamorphosis"

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Harvey Pekar is best known for his graphic autobiography, "American Splendor," which was based on his long-running comic-book series and was adapted into a film of the same name. He died in 2010.JT Waldman is an artist, interactive designer, and comic-book creator. He is the author and illustrator of the graphic novel "Megillat Esther." He lives in Philadelphia.Joyce Brabner is an award-winning author of graphic books. She frequently collaborated with her late husband, Harvey Pekar, on his "American Splendor" series. She lives in Cleveland.

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46 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Published 2 years after Pekar's death. Info about a book that can't help but raise questions 5. Juli 2012
Von Kcorn - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This short book, only 172 pages, is presented in the uniquely personal Pekar comic book style and has many of the trademarks of Harvey Pekar's graphic format: controversial with a direct, often aggressive and angry stance about life and...in this case... Judaism and Jewish identity. And, of course, there is Pekar's take on Israel.

Pekar's views about Jewish nationalism and even the existence of God differed greatly from his parents. Some readers are sure to be outraged about his conclusions - as can be the case with books focused on religion.

Illustrator JT Waldman and Pekar are shown discussing Jewish history as they roam through Cleveland, Ohio. They touch on a huge variety of topics ( especially for such a brief book), including Zionism, Pekar's attempt to emigrate to Israel, Palestinian history and more. In addition to the main material, there is also a fascinating epilogue written by Pekar's wife, Joyce Brabner.

I think it is important to note that Illustrator JT Waldman is not just a minor part of this memoir. He is also listed as a co-author of Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me as well as a significant figure in the narrative. That raises some questions about the complexities of co-authorship when one author dies before a book's publication.

Based on the information I found, this book was a work in progress, not fully completed before Pekar's death in 2010. So it was impossible for me to read it without wondering if he would have been satisfied with Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me in final form. It definitely seems abbreviated, a bit rushed, to me. But perhaps he would have left it that way.

The book is bound to offend some readers - not unique for works by Pekar. But fans will gain added insight into the author's childhood, time spent in Hebrew school, and his evolving views about Judaism and Jewish history. His parents' beliefs, backgrounds, and personalities are also revealed.

Pekar's mother was not nearly as committed to Jewish traditions as his father although she supported Israel and was proud of her Jewish relatives. As depicted in the book, Pekar's father was a more traditonally observant Jew while his mother didn't attend temple regularly, not even during Jewish holidays.

Although Pekar attended Hebrew School he questioned his religion from an early age. He was confused about learning to read Hebrew when he didn't understand how to translate the words. Ultimately, he came to see himself as Jewish but not a nationalist, a point noted by Pekar's wife, Joyce Brabner, in the book's Epilogue (also illustrated as a graphic narrative). This Epilogue, while extremely brief, adds extra perspective about Pekar's complicated relationship with his parents and Judaism.

Because it is an illustrated book, with relatively little text per page, Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me is a quick - and intriguing- read.
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Good book from a great man 24. August 2012
Von Dan Duffy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Here is another of the books Harvey put in the can before he checked out. Standing in the used bookstores and public libraries where he did his literature review the great ethnographer of diasporic Cleveland tells the story of Israel. His account is fine if you don't already know it but the added value is the author. Mom was a Communist who broke with Stalin only after he backed Nasser. Dad was religious. Harvey looked into making aliyah after our navy kicked him out because he couldn't learn how to roll socks. The rabbi cousin who repeatedly advocated for young Harvey as he struggled then turned on him for reciting the facts of the nation, the stuff that every Israeli Defense Forces planner knows. I got the last of fifteen copies at the bookstore near Duke where the clerk told me an instructor has ordered more to teach this fall. I suspect that any Dukie who reads this book with the independence of mind Harvey teaches will fail the course but I don't know that. My hope is that as we all speak to each other more candidly the fairy tales of nationalism and the false hopes of anti-colonialism will perish. Harvey's widow Joyce ends the book with a heartbreaking postscript about burying her Jew.
26 von 32 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Boy, do I miss Harvey 17. Juli 2012
Von 44488 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
And who would ever refer to him by his last name? His rhetorical style has always been based on an implied first-person intimacy with the reader, which in his best work communicates a deeply-felt emotion, vulnerability, and intelligence.

And this, his last work, is among Harvey's best, perhaps his most complex and substantial long-form story since "Our Cancer Year." The book is similar to much of his later work in that Harvey combines the evocative sense of quotidian existence that constituted the primary focus of "American Splendor" with an exploration of a "larger" topic. A historical, political, and utterly personal meditation on the past and present state of Israel and the Jewish people is a match made in heaven, so to speak, and Harvey makes the most of it. "Not the Israel My Parents Promised Me" is seriously informative for the 99.9% of us who are not experts on Jewish and Middle East history, and Harvey's personalized interpretation of those histories is simultaneously prickly and utterly, heartbreakingly reasonable.

This is also perhaps the most brilliantly, beautifully illustrated work of Harvey's long career. J.T. Waldman is a witty, thoughtful "on-screen" participant in the narrative, and his artwork is creative, beautifully conceived and executed, and entirely complementary. Ever since the early work with Robert Crumb, Harvey's best writing has been presented most successfully by artists who GET him, and Waldman's contributions here really earn him the co-author credit.

Finally, while it may be true that Harvey died before this book was entirely in the can, I found the main narrative's relative irresolution in keeping both with the complexities of the issues being confronted here and with Harvey's realist aesthetic. The truths uncovered here are both material and poetic. And the narrative coda by Harvey's wife, Joyce Brabner, strikes a perfect tone, joining the themes of this particular work and Harvey's life in an enormously moving way.
29 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Being Jewish is a Religion or is it a Culture no it could be a Nation! 4. Juli 2012
Von Richard C. Geschke - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I have followed the writings of Harvey Pekar for many years. His insights and observations have always been frank and honest. We have seen him as a young man, as a middle age person negotiating the perils of everyday life and also surviving health problems and living to tell how he dealt with them. All of his stories revolved around him walking the streets of Cleveland showing to all the culture and sights of his beloved Western Reserve.
Again Harvey, along with the talented artwork of JT Waldman goes back in time to show to all how Harvey grew up as a Jew on the Eastside of Cleveland. He shows his religious father who instills to Harvey the virtues of being Jewish. On the other hand Harvey's mother although Jewish is not a religious person whose main concern is the politics of Communism. All is graphically displayed as we see a young boy become a man living in the Jewish section of Cleveland Heights, Ohio.

It is here that Harvey along with the talents of Mr. Waldman tells the story of the Jewish people. How as a religious people who became ostracized and persecuted throughout the centuries. He tells the stories of the Jewish migration to Spain and onto Eastern Europe. In doing this Mr. Pekar gives me an education as to how the Jewish people evolved over the centuries to become the people they are today. In fact Harvey shows to all that his allegiances are not motivated by blind followings. Mr. Pekar is a thoughtful and open minded person who may have been raised Jewish but in reality is a man for all the people. His assessment that the Jewish state of Israel is a nation that was formed with the help of Great Britain and that the land was actually taken away from the Arabs is something Harvey thinks will always be the basis of eternal conflict. Harvey's rationale is simple and very correct. Even the very founding fathers of Israel acknowledge what Mr. Pekar has so eloquently brought forth in this book.
Again Harvey weaves the story of the Jewish people and brings forth his arguments as he travels from the Westside of Cleveland to the Eastside. As always we learn of the Jewish story as Harvey cruises his favorite haunts of his beloved Cleveland. I truly will miss this man who as an expatriate of Cleveland always found home in his simple and good commentaries on life on the shores of Lake Erie. This is a fitting final book done by a good and I might add a talented man.
15 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
WONDERFUL! 16. Oktober 2012
Von James Robert Smith - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Pekar was the same insightful, searching, critical thinker even toward the end. I liked his previous posthumous graphic novel, CLEVELAND, but there was something missing from it. While it was a fine work I didn't see much of Pekar's personality shining through the just-the-facts format of that one.

This book, however, is swimming in Pekar's vibes. It was great to read the words right out of his mouth again. In a way, he's still with us. In the way that only a book like this can possibly convey.

The sour grapes one-star reviews here come from people blinded by their conceits and prejudices. This is a priceless volume and I'm so happy to see it in the light of print, and to have purchased a copy.
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