In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von Not Even Wrong auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen Oder fangen Sie mit einer unserer gratis Kindle Lese-Apps sofort an zu lesen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 

Not Even Wrong: The Failure of String Theory and the Continuing Challenge to Unify the Laws of Physics [Kindle Edition]

Peter Woit
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 7,83 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 7,83  
Gebundene Ausgabe --  
Taschenbuch EUR 11,43  


Produktbeschreibungen

From Publishers Weekly

String theory is the only game in town in physics departments these days. But echoing Lee Smolin's forthcoming The Trouble with Physics (Reviews, July 24), Woit, a Ph.D. in theoretical physics and a lecturer in mathematics at Columbia, points out—again and again—that string theory, despite its two decades of dominance, is just a hunch aspiring to be a theory. It hasn't predicted anything, as theories are required to do, and its practitioners have become so desperate, says Woit, that they're willing to redefine what doing science means in order to justify their labors. The first half of Woit's book is a tightly argued, beautifully written account of the development of the standard model and includes a history of particle accelerators that will interest science buffs. When he gets into the history of string theory, however, his pace accelerates alarmingly, with highly sketchy chapters. Reading this in conjunction with Smolin's more comprehensive critique of string theory, readers will be able to make up their own minds about whether string theory lives up to the hype. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Pressestimmen

"Highly readable, accessible and powerfully persuasive" (John Cornwell Sunday Times)

"Will embolden other string critics to speak up and encourage talented young physicists to pursue other lines of research" (John Horgan Prospect)

"Compulsive reading" (Roger Penrose)

"It's a call to arms" (New Scientist)

Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
5.0 von 5 Sternen
5.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
29 von 30 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Provokativ und deshalb ein Muss 28. Dezember 2006
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Peter Woit beschreibt das aus seiner Sicht offensichtliche Versagen der Stringtheorie. Dabei erläutert Peter Woit, dass die Stringtheorie keine Vorhersagen macht und damit eigentlich keine physikalische Theorie ist, dass die Stringtheorie auch keine Mathematik sein kann, weil das klassische Vorgehen der Mathematik nicht die Arbeitsweise der Stringtheoretiker ist und welche Auswirkungen die Stringtheorie auf die Gemeinschaft der Physiker hat.

In diesen Punkten ähnelt das Buch dem Buch von Lee Smolin "The Trouble with Physics".

Die Bedeutung von "Not even wrong" ist mit dem Buch von Lee Smolin vergleichbar. Es zeigt auf, welchen Gefahren sich die Physik aussetzt, wenn es keine Möglichkeiten mehr zur Forschung basierend auf alternativen Ansätzen zur herrschenden Mehrheitsmeinung gibt. Dies hat nicht nur Auswirkungen auf die Erkenntnisse der Physik, sondern, so Peter Woit, auch auf das Wissenschaftsverständnis innerhalb der Physik.

"Not even wrong" ist nicht ganz so leicht lesbar wie das Werk "The Trouble with Physics". Dies liegt daran, dass Peter Woit ein etwas tieferes Verständnis von der Theoretischen Physik voraussetzt als Smolin.

Ich empfehle dieses Buch jedem, der an Theoretischer Physik interessiert ist
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Der anspruchsvolle Leser, selbst kein Fachmann auf dem Gebiet der Physik,nimmt jede angekündigte Neueerscheinung, die er bestellt, mit Spannung und voller Erwartung auf. Ist es doch ein grosses Erlebnis, als letztlich selbst unbeteiligter Leser an der Entwicklung unseres Naturverständnisses teilhaben zu können, und dass, ohne dabei für sie Verantwortung übernehmen zu müssen. So kann es passieren, dass man unmerklich aus dem Willen des Begreifens in die Sphäre des Vermutens hinüber wechselt und damit den Boden des Rationalen unter den Füssen verliert. Darauf will das Buch hinweisen. Auch welche Tragweite dies für die Entwicklung unserer so diffizilen Kultur haben kann.
Das Buch rüttelt auf und veranlasst auch den Laien, sein persönliches "Weltverständnis" zu überdenken.
Ein notwendiges Buch, das zur Besinnung auffordert.
Dr.med.Henner Matthis, Neurologe
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A timely and honest critique 5. April 2011
Format:Taschenbuch
I've been following the arguments made by Peter Woit against String Theory for quite some time, and it's a pleasure to be able to have them all in a single volume. His arguments are very persuasive, and his writing clear and to the point. This, however, is not a book that the general audience will find easy to follow. The earlier chapters recount the canonical story of the success of the particle physics in the 20th century, and if you are familiar with that story you can safely skip these chapters. The later chapters are the really interesting ones, but unless you have at least some familiarity with theoretical particle physics and the modern mathematics, you might find yourself lost. Even with that caveat it is still possible to appreciate the central theme of this book: theoretical particle physics took a wrong turn somewhere in the late 70s and the early 80s, and has never been able to recover from this. Woit is appealing in this book to the practitioners in the field to be more honest with their assessments of the direction in which the theoretical particle physics is headed, and the lack of any meaningful progress.

Unfortunately, I am very sceptical of the potential impact of this book on the field of particle physics. The Emperor is naked, but he is perceived as irrelevant as well.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  62 Rezensionen
352 von 381 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A high-strung but interesting and helpful polemic on string theory 5. September 2006
Von Dr. Lee D. Carlson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
String theory is a formidable subject to learn, both from a physical and mathematical standpoint. But it is even a harder subject to teach to an audience of non-experts, not because its ideas are hard to express verbally in front of this audience, but because its practitioners sometimes feel it is beneath them to do so. Those who are not familiar with string theory but are curious as to its conceptual foundations might therefore be left to themselves to pursue an understanding of these foundations. However such an understanding can be obtained, for there are of late a few books that have been written by experts in string theory that are targeted to a readership that have a strong desire to learn the subject.

The author of this book recognizes the paucity of expository material on string theory, particularly that dealing with the mathematical formalism, and although this book is a polemic against string theory and its status as a physical and scientific theory, the author introduces (perhaps on purpose) the reader to the theory in a way that is understandable without sacrificing scientific accuracy. But the book could also be of interest to more advanced readers, i.e. those (such as this reviewer) who have a thorough understanding of the physics and mathematics behind string theory but who are not conducting research in it. The author demands rightfully that scientific theory must be testable or at least must have some amount of empirical predictions. He pulls no punches in his critique of string theory, and is very open about what he thinks are the motivations behind those who are actively involved in it. A researcher's motivations of course are not germane to the validity of a theory that he or she proposes, but they are relevant to the understanding of why a particular theory is entrenched in the scientific community, even though there is no experimental evidence for it.

This reviewer disagrees with the author in his claim that string theory is not a "beautiful" theory. And it is the mathematical formalism that is used in string theory that gives it its beauty. Indeed, just the algebraic geometry alone that is employed in string theory is an example of this. That combined with the differential geometry, complex manifolds, and algebraic topology makes string theory a beautiful multi-faceted mathematical gem. That being said, there are many ideas in string theory that deserve to be classified as "speculative" mathematics, as the author does in this book. This classification arises because of the presence of the ubiquitous path integral, an object that has resisted rigorous mathematical formulation.

So yes, the mathematical formalism behind string theory is beautiful, and intoxicates those who contemplate it. But a physical theory must be more than just "mental masturbation" (a characterization imputed to the physicist Murray Gell-Mann in the book). It must also make predictions that can be measured in the laboratory, and these measurements must be reproducible and above all understandable to interested parties. The author does not find any of these predictions in the string theory as it exists at the present time, and he is correct in his claims.

Those who have worked in the academic setting will understand fully the negative reaction the author received when the manuscript was being circulated for review, and which he describes in some detail in the book. This criticism of course was anonymous, following the usual practice in the research community, and such anonymity is a temptation for recklessness and vituperation, and the author gives examples of this. So the book does not only describe some of the ideas of string theory, it also goes into the social interactions and attitudes among string theorists. It would be unfair to say that all string theorists are arrogant and protective of their status as academicians. But those that meet this characterization are in a position that cannot be morally justified. The discovery of scientific truth demands a transparency not only because of the complications of the theory, but also because those who are not directly participating in it are responsible for it's financing (the taxpayer). String theorists, along with all scientific and mathematical researchers are morally obligated to report their discoveries to those who are not in their field in a manner that makes it crystal clear what they are all about. String theory should not be a collection of documents that are to be protected and interpreted by a small body of privileged priests of knowledge.
140 von 150 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A timely and honest critique 12. September 2006
Von Dr. Bojan Tunguz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I've been following the arguments made by Peter Woit against String Theory for quite some time, and it's a pleasure to be able to have them all in a single volume. His arguments are very persuasive, and his writing clear and to the point. This, however, is not a book that the general audience will find easy to follow. The earlier chapters recount the canonical story of the success of the particle physics in the 20th century, and if you are familiar with that story you can safely skip these chapters. The later chapters are the really interesting ones, but unless you have at least some familiarity with theoretical particle physics and the modern mathematics, you might find yourself lost. Even with that caveat it is still possible to appreciate the central theme of this book: theoretical particle physics took a wrong turn somewhere in the late 70s and the early 80s, and has never been able to recover from this. Woit is appealing in this book to the practitioners in the field to be more honest with their assessments of the direction in which the theoretical particle physics is headed, and the lack of any meaningful progress.

Unfortunately, I am very sceptical of the potential impact of this book on the field of particle physics. The Emperor is naked, but he is perceived as irrelevant as well.
108 von 119 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Open mind 4. September 2006
Von Couder - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The first part - essentially an account of the development of the standard model - really isn't aimed at the layperson at all - the total lack of equations notwithstanding. I much prefer F. Close's "The Cosmic Onion" (released in 1983 but a new edition called "The New Cosmic Onion" is now available), Veltman's "Facts and Mysteries in Elementary Particle Physics" or even Lisa Randall's account in her very popular "Warped passages". However, Peter Woit does show some originality in approaching the matter from a mathematician's point of view, and in elucidating the important role of Hermann Weyl in the development of quantum mechanics, something you certainly won't find in other popular books on theoretical physics.

The second part sets out to prove that String Theory (ST), the acclaimed (or proclaimed?) successor of the standard model - is "not even wrong", meaning that this theory can't even be falsified. A very ungrateful task, given a) the attractiveness String Theory noticeably exerts on both professional theoretical physicists and laypersons alike (as evidenced by the huge popularity of Brian Greene's and Michio Kaku's books, amongst others); and b) the fact that alternative (and far less celebrated) approaches seem to be - from a layman's perspective at least - as tentative as ST.
I cannot say his strategy appears to be very coherent - we rather get a succession of pinprick attacks. Each of those in itself would probably not have convinced me there was something wrong with ST, but taken together, they succeed in making ST far less incontestable than some popular science writers would have us believe.

This is not a book I would easily recommend to the average lay person totally ignorant of particle physics - one would have to read a number of other popular science books first (*) - but to my knowledge Peter Woit is the first who dared to challenge the "ST establishment" so openly and fearlessly. If only for the sake of "open-mindedness", I suggest one reads this book (and preferably Lee Smolin's book "The Trouble with physics" also), together with some of the excellent popular books on ST if you haven't already done so.

(*) In fact, I would almost consider A. Schumm's "Deep Down Things: The Breathtaking Beauty of Particle Physics" compulsory reading before attempting to read the first part of Woit's book.
97 von 113 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Huh? 29. August 2006
Von Free Thinker - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
It is said that over the entrance to Plato's Academy hung a sign that read "let no one ignorant of geometry enter these walls." A similar sign should be posted on the cover of this book, also mentioning a knowledge of calculus, algebra, and number theory.
Nonetheless it is a very good book which illustrates how fads and peer pressure can effect even the most dispassionate among us.

It's basic message can be summed up as follows: 20th century physics did a great job of explaining how the world works. By 1975 the fundamentals of underlying reality were pretty well understood, save for a few loose threads. The most troublesome of these was the question of how to explain gravity in a way that harmonized with quantum mechanics.

A group of well-meaning mathematicians and physicists developed an idea called string theory to solve this final problem.From the first it appealed to many as an elegant and beautiful theory, and soon the physics community was singing its praises.

Unfortunately, many decades later, it remains not only unproven but unprovable. No one has yet devised a way to make predictions from it that can be proven true or falsified, ex. the claim that there are dimensions beyond the four we currently experience. Without the ability to empirically examine its claims, it is not science, but rather a form of mathematical philosophy. Given this, it behooves the scientific community to look in other directions for a true unified field theory.

It takes the author 275 pages to say this, and along the way he dumps on heavy doses of higher math terminology which will leave the unitiated with their heads spinning. Being no mathematician, I was sent to the dictionary numerous times seeking meanings for several of the terms he threw out.

I suggest that prospective readers familiarize themselves with the following terms before tackling this book:

Imaginary numbers

Symmetry (as used in physics)

Representation Theory

Field theory

Differential Geometry

Spinors

Supergravity

And there are more that I can't think of right now...

Despite its challenges I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking to understand the current state of thought in advanced physics. It gives a glimpse of the dark side of science, where universiy politics and trendy ideas all too often decide how research dollars will be spent.

A suggestion to the publisher: you may want to consider including a glossary at the end of future editions, explaining the jargon in layperson's terms.

As for myself I enjoyed the mind-expanding effect that came from the struggle to understand the technical details, and I believe I was actually able to grasp the gist of most of them after supplemental study. Mathematics experts and intellectually courageous seekers of truth should enjoy the book as well, once they grasp the significance of supersymmetrical forms not breaking down under vacuum conditions, leading to speculation about how the beta function, first studied in the 1800s, seemingly has the potential to describe an analytic s-matrix.
Elementary!
40 von 45 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Deep, deep Thoughts 19. Mai 2008
Von Harry R. Jordan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
I picked up "Not Even Wrong" after working my way through "The Trouble with Physics" by Lee Smolin. Both books attack the problems of string theory from much the same direction - string theory shows none of the results necessary to be classified as anything more than a new type of math. In other words, if you can't use it to predict any new results and it only confirms old results by presetting all your variables to already known values, it's not science. And the opposite of science is religion, which is exactly how a lot of string theory adherents view this new math. "The Trouble with Physics" is an easier read, with lots of background, history and characters. "Not Even Wrong" assumes you are already up to speed on the theory, because Peter Wolfe spends very little time spoonfeeding the precepts and gets down to foundation level problems immediately. I have no background past high school level math and physics but can usually hold my own with popular science texts. I would not recommend "Not Even Wrong" as a beginning text or even intermediate - this is for people who understand the concepts already.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden