• Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Gebraucht: Gut | Details
Verkauft von super-buecher
Zustand: Gebraucht: Gut
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,30 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 2 Bilder anzeigen

Nine Stories (Roman) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Mai 1991


Alle 14 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 5,40
EUR 3,22 EUR 0,66
79 neu ab EUR 3,22 15 gebraucht ab EUR 0,66

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Studienbücher: Ob neu oder gebraucht, alle wichtigen Bücher für Ihr Studium finden Sie im großen Studium Special. Natürlich portofrei.


Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Nine Stories (Roman) + Franny and Zooey (Roman) + The Catcher in the Rye
Preis für alle drei: EUR 17,60

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 208 Seiten
  • Verlag: Little, Brown and Company; Auflage: Reprint (1. Mai 1991)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0316769509
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316769501
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 10,6 x 1,4 x 17,1 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (76 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 18.751 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

J. D. Salinger wurde 1919 in New York geboren. Seit 1941 veröffentlichte er diverse Kurzgeschichten, 1951 folgten der weltbekannte "Fänger im Roggen" und bis 1963 drei weitere Romane. Letzte Veröffentlichung 1965. J. D. Salinger lebte jahrzehntelang äußerst zurückgezogen auf seiner Farm in New Hampshire und verstarb dort am 28. Januar 2010.

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

In the J.D. Salinger benchmark "A Perfect Day for Bananafish," Seymour Glass floats his beach mate Sybil on a raft and tells her about these creatures' tragic flaw. Though they seem normal, if one swims into a hole filled with bananas, it will overeat until it's too fat to escape. Meanwhile, Seymour's wife, Muriel, is back at their Florida hotel, assuring her mother not to worry--Seymour hasn't lost control. Mention of a book he sent her from Germany and several references to his psychiatrist lead the reader to believe that World War II has undone him.

The war hangs over these wry stories of loss and occasionally unsuppressed rage. Salinger's children are fragile, odd, hypersmart, whereas his grownups (even the materially content) seem beaten down by circumstances--some neurasthenic, others (often female) deeply unsympathetic. The greatest piece in this disturbing book may be "The Laughing Man," which starts out as a man's recollection of the pleasures of storytelling and ends with the intersection between adult need and childish innocence. The narrator remembers how, at nine, he and his fellow Comanches would be picked up each afternoon by the Chief--a Staten Island law student paid to keep them busy. At the end of each day, the Chief winds them down with the saga of a hideously deformed, gentle, world-class criminal. With his stalwart companions, which include "a glib timber wolf" and "a lovable dwarf," the Laughing Man regularly crosses the Paris-China border in order to avoid capture by "the internationally famous detective" Marcel Dufarge and his daughter, "an exquisite girl, though something of a transvestite." The masked hero's luck comes to an end on the same day that things go awry between the Chief and his girlfriend, hardly a coincidence. "A few minutes later, when I stepped out of the Chief's bus, the first thing I chanced to see was a piece of red tissue paper flapping in the wind against the base of a lamppost. It looked like someone's poppy-petal mask. I arrived home with my teeth chattering uncontrollably and was told to go straight to bed."

Synopsis

"DeDaumier-Smith's Blue Period," "Teddy," and "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" are among the nine works in a collection of Salinger's perceptive and realistic short stories.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?

Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 12. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
J.D. Salinger has rightfully been one of the most highly praised authors of the 20th century. Although best known for his coming-of-age novel, The Catcher in the Rye, Salinger also wrote brilliant short stories of great complexity. This is quite an accomplishment when one considers the fact that the short story poses problems the novel easily overcomes.
Salinger's skillful use of language is what distinguishes him most from his contemporaries. There is never a dull moment in a Salinger short story as this expert author intertwines detail and dialogue to convey emotion to the reader.
Although the short story leaves little room for character development, Salinger's superb style and careful use of language allow us to get to know his characters intimately in a very short period of time.
The stories included in Salinger's dazzling collection, Nine Stories, were published between 1948 and 1953 in The New Yorker.
They exhibit a unified tone and theme, something not usually found in short story collections. They are classic Salinger and classic stories; each one contributes to the volume as a whole and each is therefore enriched in its relation to the others.
Although people disagree on which story is best, each contains elements of the relationship between children and adults, one of Salinger's signature themes.
Two of the stories, A Perfect Day for Bananafish and For Esmé--With Love and Squalor, both feature protagonists (Seymour and Sargent X) who, as veterans of WWII, have sacrificed their psychological well-being and are no longer the men they once thought they were. Both feel alienated from life and, more importantly, from those they love.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 19. März 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
When they ask for a review, I never know what to write. 'Nine Stories' is the second Salinger book I've ever read, and, as always, I'm captivated by his writing style and ability to create characters I've seen when looking in the mirror, or glancing around a crowded area. The greatest tradgedy of Salinger is not found in his stories of depression, mental illness, or quiet desperation. The great tradgedy is that he only wrote four books. I like 'Nine Stories' due to it's crazy, 3-dimensional characters, and the insanity of the plots like 'A Perfect Day for Bananafish' and 'The Laughing Man'. 'DePalmer Smith's Blue Period' is the best character study I've seen in any book in the English language. The only complaint I have is that Salinger settles into a repetitive procedure of bringing all his characters to life in the same way. I might have liked to read one story in this book that starred a character completely unlike the others. Someone said in an earlier review that 'there is a Holden inside each of these people.' This is why I did not give the book a perfect 10. While it is not boring, I think Salinger could have done more given his tremendous writing powers. Overall, however, this is a not-to-be-missed book.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Doug Vaughn am 13. Dezember 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
Perhaps one of the reasons I never cared for Catcher in the Rye was that I came to it after reading Salinger's Nine Stories, which in every way seems much superior. These stories work in a way that many collections of short stories by a single author don't, because of a unified tone and single vision that is at once both bleak and yet sympathetic to what is fundamental in the human condition.
I first read this collection more than 30 years ago and have reread all the stories numerous times with great pleasure. It is a shame that Salinger retired so early, but even if he had left nothing but this one short collection of stories, he would have secured a place among the significant writers of the 20th century. Through a style that is disarmingly simple and direct, he manages to touch reader's feelings deeply. And while in his later Glass family novels he slips into a kind of 'cute' self parody, these stories are deftly crafted with no misstep to be seen.
This is art that doesn't refuse to have a human heart.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 2. Mai 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
I can see the problem with most of the people that didn't like this book. They expected stories... but this book's main course aren't stories, but feelings. Salinger used stories, places, characters and situations to paint feelings, the way a painter would use oil and canvas to paint a picture. So at the end of the story you don't have to see if you liked the story... what you got to do is look at how do you feel after you've read it. What Salinger tried to make you feel is mostly feelings like melancholy, and he succeeds at that, and thats what makes it a great book...
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von "zeke_third-shift-rules" am 7. Juni 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
With one hand on the keyboard, my other (free) hand moves horizontally back and forth through the air - that's the sound of one hand clapping for this, arguably Jerome David Salinger's best book.
"The Laughing Man" is stunning - someone says all of JD's folks are either good or bad phonies, but there is neither in this - an amazing pairing of an Indiana Jones type serial interwoven into a moving love story w/completely different characters. JD gives us TWO complete stories in what 20 pages (or less)? TWO stories in 20 pages that are both astoundingly good, so good any other author would need 200 pages to do half as good a job. The love part on 'the Chief'/Comanche coach is fantastic, and anybody, female or male, who's ever been truly heartbroken, will be moved more than words can say; and our funny-rictused 'Indy' hero exists in riveting action. As different as those 2 parts are, JD intertwines them seamlessly. The only fiction I've ever read equal to "The Laughing Man" is Irving's A PRAYER FOR OWEN MEANY. "...Banana Fish" is a coaster rolling from riotously funny to 'the blues'. You'll look at corners differently after the touching "...Esme..." In "...Dinghy", JD actually writes a nice, loving parent who takes time to understand her child, which may be his only published instance of doing that. "Teddy" is another touching example of how JD weaves the melancholy with the humorous so expertly.
And as a few reviewers are obviously confused, in "Pretty Mouth" the husband is anguished because he suspects his wife is out RIGHT THEN cheating on him, so he calls his best friend.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen