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Next Global Stage: The: Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World
 
 

Next Global Stage: The: Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World [Kindle Edition]

Kenichi Ohmae
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Harvard Business Review's Review of The Next Global Stage The Next Global Stage:Challenges and Opportunities in Our Borderless World Kenichi Ohmae (Wharton School Publishing, 2005) In the early 1900s, German physicist Werner Heisenberg laid the foundations for quantum mechanics, a set of rules showing that at the subatomic level Newtonian physics was irrelevant. Just as quantum mechanics upstaged Newton, says strategist Kenichi Ohmae, a radical new model is upending old notions about the global economy. In this sprawling book, Ohmae warns that governments, businesses, and leaders that cling to their Newtonian approaches will become irrelevant themselves. The heart of Ohmae's thesis will be familiar to readers of his previous books, including The Borderless World (1990) and The Invisible Continent (2000): In the new global economy, the nation-state, and the protectionist economic thinking that goes with it, is obsolete. Nation-states have borders, armies, flags, currencies, and a development-stifling instinct to protect their economies from the outside world. As global economic players, they're being displaced by "region states"-borderless centers of vibrant economic activity that welcome global trade and investment, like the Shutoken metropolitan area of Japan and Guangzhou in China. If the rules of the old economy no longer apply, Ohmae ventures, then neither do the old rules of business. Fair enough. The problem is, he says, no one knows, or can know, what the new rules are: "By the time any rule book or user's manual appears...the 'new rules' will already be obsolete." What business leaders can be sure of, Ohmae argues, is that massive change without requires massive change within. That means wall-to-wall rethinking of corporate mission, strategy, and organization. Companies must cut loose from their "ancestry" and, for instance, compete by selling the very products that threaten them. Clinging to the core, as Kodak did in the face of predation by digital-camera makers, is a recipe for failure in this new age. Companies must cast off their sentimental attachment to the nation-states where they're headquartered and jettison their hierarchies and old approaches to markets. Their leaders must become visionary facilitators without preconceived attitudes about their roles-ready to embrace even the idea that the best leader may be a team, not an individual. There can be no half measures in this radical transformation, Ohmae says, no testing the waters before taking the plunge. It's a strong prescription. Unfortunately, this lively book can't, by its own admission, give business readers what they want most: practical advice for competing in the global economy. But it does remind executives to pry their gaze from the present and set it firmly on the future. As Heisenberg well understood, the more doggedly you map where a moving target is, the less you know about where it's headed. -Gardiner Morse

Kurzbeschreibung

Globalization is a fact. You can't stop it; it has already happened; it is here to stay. And we are moving into a new global stage.

A radically new world is taking shape from the ashes of yesterday's nation-based economic world. To succeed, you must act on the global stage, leveraging radically new drivers of economic power and growth. Legendary business strategist Kenichi Ohmae–who in The Borderless World, published in 1990, predicted the rise and success of globalization, coining the very word–synthesizes today's emerging trends into the first coherent view of tomorrow's global economy–and its implications for politics, business, and personal success.

Ohmae explores the dynamics of the new "region state," tomorrow's most potent economic institution, and demonstrates how China is rapidly becoming the exemplar of this new economic paradigm. The Next Global Stage offers a practical blueprint for businesses, governments, and individuals who intend to thrive in this new environment. Ohmae concludes with a detailed look at strategy in an era where it's tougher to define competitors, companies, and customers than ever before.

As important as Huntington's The Clash of Civilizations, as fascinating as Friedman's The Lexus and the Olive Tree, this book doesn't just explain what's already happened: It offers a roadmap for action in the world that's beginning to emerge.

  • New economics for a borderless world
    Why Keynes' and Milton Friedman's economics are history–and what might replace them

  • Leveraging today's most powerful platforms for growth
    From Windows to English to your global brand

  • Technology: driving business death–and rebirth
    Anticipating technological obsolescence–and jumping ahead of it

  • Government in the post-national era
    What government can do when nation-states don't matter

  • Leadership and strategy on the global stage
    Honing your global vision and global leadership skills


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1539 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 312 Seiten
  • Gleichzeitige Verwendung von Geräten: Bis zu 5 Geräte gleichzeitig, je nach vom Verlag festgelegter Grenze
  • Verlag: FT Press; Auflage: 1 (17. März 2005)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B000P28VZY
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #275.599 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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5.0 von 5 Sternen 'The End of Economics' 26. September 2005
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Für Kenichi Ohmae sind alle Bestrebungen die Globalisierung aufzuhalten vergebene Liebesmüh. Seiner Meinung nach leben wir bereits in einer „borderless world". Durch die zunehmende Durchlässigkeit vieler nationaler Grenzen, teils aufgrund internationaler und bilateraler Abkommen, teils aufgrund des technischen Fortschritts in den Kommunikationstechnologien, sind die wichtigsten Geschäftsfaktoren („The Big Cs") weltweit vorhanden: communications, capital, corporations und consumers.
Aus seinem breiten wissenschaftlichen und praktischen Hintergrund skizziert Ohmae die Grundlagen und Dynamiken einer Welt nach der Globalisierung. Er bietet mit The Next Global Stage einen praktischen Ratgeber für Unternehmen, Politik und Individuen, die sich den Aufgaben einer post-globalen Welt stellen wollen oder müssen.
Ohmae schildert die Welt und die Entwicklungen auf der „globalen Bühne" in Form eines Theaterstückes und unterteilt es in die Abschnitte The Stage, Stage Directions und The Script.
Im ersten Abschnitt beschreibt er „die Bühne" auf der das Theaterstück spielt. Er beschreibt detailliert und mit volkwirtschaftlichem Fokus:
- die Entwicklung, Verbreitung und wirtschaftlichen Folgen der PC-Technologie,
- die Öffnung des „Eisernen Vorhangs" und die Folgen des dadurch ermöglichten nahezu globalen Informationsaustausches und
- das Wachstum der „region states", wie Irland, Finnland und die prosperierenden regionalen Wirtschaftszentren in China und Indien.
Vor dem Hintergrund dieser Entwicklungen proklamiert er „The End of Economics" in ihrem klassischen Sinne.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Different times require a new script 29. Januar 2006
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
“I have been rehearsing the arguments that from the backbone of ‘The Next Global Stage’ for more than two decades.” K. Ohmae writes, “My previous books, including ‘The Borderless World’ and ‘The Invisible Continent,’ examined many of the issues I am still exploring. Ideas, as I say, do not emerge in a state of perfection. In its genesis, ‘The Next Global Stage’ has been shaped by two forces. First, it bears witness to changing circumstances. Over the last two decades, the world has changed substantially. The economic, political, social, corporate, and personal rules that now apply bear scant relation to those applicable two decades ago. ‘Different times require a new script’…The second defining force behind ‘The Next Global Stage’ is that, over the last 20 years, I have witnessed some of the pioneers of the global economy firsthand. One of the first business leaders to be sympathetic to the notion of the truly global economy was the former CEO of Smith Kline Beecham, Henry Wendt. He saw cross-border alliances as a potential savior for the American pharmaceuticals industry and recognized that internationally based strategic alliances would become important, if not vital…Another early pioneer of the global economy was Walter Wriston, former chairman of Citibank. He saw globalization as an imperative not because of management or business theories, but because of technological breakthroughs. He prophesized that competition between banks would no longer be based on banking services, but on acquiring better technology. Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Basic Book on Globalization 12. Dezember 2005
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is part reflection and part promotion. Author Kenichi Ohmae not only reflects on the course of globalization, but also takes the time to promote his distance-learning business and spotlight some of his friends. Ohmae, recently named advisor to Liaoning Province, particularly praises the province's former governor. Some of Ohmae's reflections are valuable bedrock information about globalization, but some seem curiously dated. He describes how surprised he was when he learned that people with whom he was dining had "Googled" him and could speak knowledgably about his life and work. He explains how capital moves unimpeded around the world, notes that ATMs and credit cards are important new mechanisms, and introduces a new business class whose members attended similar schools and all speak English. He teaches that regions should not cut themselves off from the flow of international capital and ideas, but instead should tap into it. Japan should be less protectionist and less centralized. And, yes, China is growing rapidly but treats workers horribly. We recommend this book to those who are new to globalization and need a prompt understanding of these fundamentals, plus ample background information and a bonus of more sophisticated interpretive insights (just not enough of them).
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Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Whenever I meet top corporate strategists for the first time, Kenichi Ohmae's books always come up. Someone will ask, "Which one do you like best?" With The Next Global Stage, my answer has changed to this book. For those who want a more conceptual version of The World Is Flat that applies to future company and government decisions, The Next Global Stage is a good choice.

Mr. Ohmae makes several important arguments that will stimulate your mind for years to come.

1. Business decisions must be considered in terms of four dimensions in today's borderless world: communications, capital, corporations and consumers. This new perspective replaces his famous three c's in The Mind of the Strategist (competitors, the company and consumers).

2. The proper geographical entity to consider for decision making is a region rather than a nation state or a trading bloc. Such an entity will usually have at least 10 million people in it and will usually be part of a country.

3. Competitiveness is enhanced by expanding up and adding more common platforms (such as Windows, the Web, English, credit card systems, influential paradigms, and parallel educational backgrounds) whether as a company or as a geographical region.

4. Paradigms for making national political and economic policy are obsolete because they do not encompass solutions and money flows involving other countries. The new reality is here, but the paradigms to address the reality are not.

5. The borderless world has changed the tasks of political and business leaders in ways that most leaders are ignoring to their peril.
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Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  31 Rezensionen
38 von 39 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen An Asian Strategist's View of Future Globalization 30. Mai 2005
Von Donald Mitchell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Whenever I meet top corporate strategists for the first time, Kenichi Ohmae's books always come up. Someone will ask, "Which one do you like best?" With The Next Global Stage, my answer has changed to this book. For those who want a more conceptual version of The World Is Flat that applies to future company and government decisions, The Next Global Stage is a good choice.

Mr. Ohmae makes several important arguments that will stimulate your mind for years to come.

1. Business decisions must be considered in terms of four dimensions in today's borderless world: communications, capital, corporations and consumers. This new perspective replaces his famous three c's in The Mind of the Strategist (competitors, the company and consumers).

2. The proper geographical entity to consider for decision making is a region rather than a nation state or a trading bloc. Such an entity will usually have at least 10 million people in it and will usually be part of a country.

3. Competitiveness is enhanced by expanding up and adding more common platforms (such as Windows, the Web, English, credit card systems, influential paradigms, and parallel educational backgrounds) whether as a company or as a geographical region.

4. Paradigms for making national political and economic policy are obsolete because they do not encompass solutions and money flows involving other countries. The new reality is here, but the paradigms to address the reality are not.

5. The borderless world has changed the tasks of political and business leaders in ways that most leaders are ignoring to their peril.

The book is enriched by a variety of perspectives involving geographic regions and countries that have prospered where success could not be assumed (such as companies in Sweden, Finland, Singapore, Dalian in China, the Multimedia Super Corridor in Malaysia, and Ireland) and which regions have the potential to become such prosperity centers in the future (especially in Asia and the Baltic). Mr. Ohmae is a strategist . . . and also an entrepreneur. His examples of own businesses enliven and illuminate his points in ways that considering Dell cannot do alone.

Regional politicians and CEOs will find that they can use this book to help decide which questions and issues they should be addressing. Although it's not clear what exactly has to be done, the result will be more agile responses in terms of amending business and political models to fit the shifting environments than would otherwise occur. As someone who advocates continuing business innovation in The Ultimate Competitive Advantage, I was pleased to see that Mr. Ohmae reaches the same conclusion in The Next Global Stage.

For those in Europe and the United States who are new to thinking about global competition and global supply chains, this book will be an essential primer to help acquire the insights needed to prosper over the next decade.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Next Best Seller 14. Mai 2005
Von John G. Hilliard - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The first thing I noticed about this book were the actual words and sentence structure. I do not want to make too much out of it, but you can tell that the author is not a native westerner. This made the book more enjoyable for me because of the sing song way the author writes. Now on to the book. One could argue that the world has changed more in the last 20 years then ever before and it is due to or has caused what we call globalization. Everything is changing and at a much faster pace then most of us would like. This book takes a good look at how business and individuals can take advantage of or at least be prepared for even further globalization.

The book starts by taking a look at the current state of the world and how we fit into it. The author talks to us about the areas of the world that are exploding as well as the overall global economy. The author then explores what major trends are taking place in the global economy. He ends the book with a review of how the trends he covered will change nations governments. Overall it is a very interesting and well written book. I felt I was learning something new on each page. The only minor criticism I would have is that the author did seem to be very confident in him self to the point of being a bit arrogant. The book is well worth your time if you are interested in the global economy.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Barriers coming down 11. Mai 2005
Von Dr. Cathy Goodwin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This book was a pleasant surprise. The author argues that economic theories have become outdated by our new realities, especially technology and international outsourcing. The information about specific economies, such as Finland's, is fascinating. The author's Japanese background forces Americans (like me) to recognize a new perspective.

I related to this book because I work via computer from a small town in southern New Mexico. I do business with people I will never see and take receipts (via credit card) from all over the world. So I live the society Ohmae writes about (except that he needs to revise his belief about technololgical aptitude of the over-40 set).

Ohmae is best when he's discussing global strategies on a broad, conceptual level. When it comes to implementation, the discussion gets fuzzier. For instance, it's hard to imagine any government voluntarily changing, especially in terms of giving up power.

And while new leaders need to be trained in analytical thinking, our current educational system seems to be moving to rote memory, tested by exams. While borders may be coming down, security measures are going up.

I was also a little puzzled by Ohmae's discussion of distance learning. He's right: mainstream universities in the US have tended to regard distance learning as an unwanted stepchild. Yet he fails to observe that "alternative" universities have seized the opportunity to attract working adults with money and motivation. The quality of these non-traditional options can vary a great deal -- perhaps an example of a market failure.

I believe this book should be read in conjunction with another Wharton business book, Power of Impossible Thinking. Ohmae introduces a new mental model: a world where borders disappear as we use ATMs and buy through credit cards. Yet (as Wind et al point out) some paradigm shifts are two-way streets: many institutions continue to retain old-fashioned gateways.

For instance, in the US, we still have archaic state borders that make little sense today. There's a certain irony when the term "long distance call" has lost meaning, but if we move across a state line, we need new health insurance.

In a more amusing example, I was offered a part-time job where I'd be working from home, over a thousand miles from the institution, communicating over the Internet. The company sent complex forms that had to be completed by hand (lots of little square boxes) and also a form to sign, promising I would bring no illegal drugs to the workplace. I do not use drugs but I wondered, "Does this mean no catnip for the cats in the room I use for my office? What does 'the workplace' mean when you're telecommuting?"

I didn't pursue the job ...but after reading both this book and Power of Impossible Thinking (Wind et al.) I realized I was caught up in a conflict of mental models created by the Next Global Stage.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen A Whole New World Explained-from a regional perspective 31. Juli 2005
Von Roger E. Herman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
When a man has written over 100 books, it would be easy to assume there's nothing more for him to say. That assumption would be unfounded when you consider the work of Kenichi Ohmae. This prolific professor-in the broad sense of the word-still has a lot of ideas and opinions to share...and a worthwhile portion of it is in this book. Although he weaves in some work from previous writing, all the pieces in The Next Global Stage fit nicely together.

Looking at the title of this book, I thought about the expression that "All the world's a stage...." And, sure enough, that's the way Ohmae approaches his perspective of what's coming next. He presents his thoughts in theatrical terms, beginning with the plot to open our thinking. Part one is The Stage. The curtain rises with a world tour as our eyes are opened to some of what is happening in various parts of the world. For those who have focused so intently on China and India, insight into Ireland and Finland will be a new direction in thinking. A range of other low-on-the-radar countries are also addressed in the book by the extremely well-traveled author. The global economy is defined as we learn more about Ohmae's view of the end of economics. Beyond nation-states, it is now more appropriate to think of regions, he argues.

Stage Directions (Part 2) takes us on a journey to understand the playmakers and views of global regionalism and their roles in future development. Government and politics are discussed in the third section of the book and readers gain insights into future markets and a wide range of countries where things are happening...probably beyond the knowledge of the average reader. There is much to be learned from reading this book.

As we look at the world of today and consider where we may be going, The Next Global Stage will help us to appreciate what's next. Thoughtful reading, easy to follow and absorb. Good index supports research and re-reading. Global strategists seeking food for thought will find what they need in these pages.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Globalization - it has been coming since the beginning of time! 7. Juli 2005
Von Michael A. Edwards - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Ohmae is one of our most insightful thought leaders. this new book is timely, straight forward and speaks to the emerging community, not simply the global economy. I have used several of his works (Mind of the Strategist, Borderless World (& revisied), The End of the Nation State, and others) as required reading and discussion in my MBA course "Marketing Management" at the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul/Minneapolis, Minnesota. His works drive our "open-ended" discussions that cover issues of not only globalization, but ethics, culture and the concern for the larges single problem facing the community know as the United States of America, "How will the United States and its citizens learn to become a minority nation" on this planet of more than 6+billion people"
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These business factors I have labeled the four C's: communications, capital, corporations, and consumers. &quote;
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As you can see, I believe that nothing is more important than actually visiting the place, meeting with companies, and talking to CEOs, employees, and consumers. &quote;
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Even in the days of the Internet and global cable news, walking around, listening, looking, and asking a question is still the best way to learn. &quote;
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