Mind and World und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 3,25 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von Mind and World auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Mind and World [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

John McDowell
4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
Preis: EUR 24,95 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 2 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Donnerstag, 18. September: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 16,98  
Gebundene Ausgabe --  
Taschenbuch EUR 24,95  

Kurzbeschreibung

30. August 1996
Modern philosophy finds it difficult to give a satisfactory picture of the place of minds in the world. In "Mind and World", based on the 1991 John Locke Lectures, John McDowell offers his diagnosis of this difficulty and points to a cure. He illustrates a major problem of modern philosophy - the insidious persistence of dualism - in his discussion of empirical thought. Much as we would like to conceive empirical thought as rationally grounded in experience, pitfalls await anyone who tries to articulate this position, and McDowell exposes these traps by exploiting the work of contemporary philosophers from Wilfrid Sellars to Donald Davidson. These difficulties, he contends, reflect an understandable - but surmountable - failure to see how we might integrate what Sellars calls "the logical space of reasons" into the natural world. What underlies this impasse is a conception of nature that has certain attractions for the modern age, a conception that McDowell proposes to put aside, thus circumventing these philosophical difficulties. By returning to a pre-modern conception of nature but retaining the intellectual advance of modernity that has mistakenly been viewed as dislodging it, he makes room for a fully satisfying conception of experience as a rational openness to independent reality. This approach also overcomes other obstacles that impede a generally satisfying understanding of how we are placed in the world.

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Studienbücher: Ob neu oder gebraucht, alle wichtigen Bücher für Ihr Studium finden Sie im großen Studium Special. Natürlich portofrei.


Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Mind and World + Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind
Preis für beide: EUR 50,22

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 191 Seiten
  • Verlag: Harvard University Press; Auflage: New Ed (30. August 1996)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0674576101
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674576100
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23,3 x 15,3 x 1,4 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 89.012 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Ever since Descartes, a lot of the very best philosophers have thought of science as an invading army from whose depredations safe havens have somehow to be constructed. Philosophy patrols the borders, keeping the sciences "intellectually respectable" by keeping them "within...proper bounds." But you have to look outside these bounds if what you care about is the life of the spirit or the life of the mind. McDowell's is as good a contemporary representative of this kind of philosophical sensibility as you could hope to find. -- Jerry Fodor London Review of Books A powerfully impressive book which simply towers over the more routine contributions of current analytical philosophy. -- Simon Glendinning Radical Philosophy McDowell locates an important tension in our thinking about thought, suggests an attractive way of easing the tension, and offers a plausible diagnosis of why the tension is acute...Mind and World is a genuinely provocative book that should be discussed. -- Paul M. Pietroski Canadian Journal of Philosophy

Synopsis

Modern philosophy finds it difficult to give a satisfactory picture of the place of minds in the world. In "Mind and World", based on the 1991 John Locke Lectures, John McDowell offers his diagnosis of this difficulty and points to a cure. He illustrates a major problem of modern philosophy - the insidious persistence of dualism - in his discussion of empirical thought. Much as we would like to conceive empirical thought as rationally grounded in experience, pitfalls await anyone who tries to articulate this position, and McDowell exposes these traps by exploiting the work of contemporary philosophers from Wilfrid Sellars to Donald Davidson. These difficulties, he contends, reflect an understandable - but surmountable - failure to see how we might integrate what Sellars calls "the logical space of reasons" into the natural world. What underlies this impasse is a conception of nature that has certain attractions for the modern age, a conception that McDowell proposes to put aside, thus circumventing these philosophical difficulties.

By returning to a pre-modern conception of nature but retaining the intellectual advance of modernity that has mistakenly been viewed as dislodging it, he makes room for a fully satisfying conception of experience as a rational openness to independent reality. This approach also overcomes other obstacles that impede a generally satisfying understanding of how we are placed in the world.


Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Einleitungssatz
1. The overall topic I am going to consider in these lectures is the way concepts mediate the relation between minds and the world. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
Mehr entdecken
Wortanzeiger
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

5 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
4.0 von 5 Sternen
4.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen For philosophy majors 11. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This is a difficult, but well written text of a series of lectures given by McDowell. Frankly, it required a lot of concentration on my part, but the effort was worth it. McDowell makes good sense of the problems of empiricism. He is also a good stylist.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 von 5 Sternen  6 Rezensionen
32 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Essential Reading 19. November 2001
Von Flounder - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
This text with its new Introduction clearly demonstrates McDowell's prominence in American philosophy. McDowell is certainly one of the most important, careful, and creative minds in the field. Mind and World is crucial reading material on perceptual content, judgment, and experience.
Inspired by Sellars's Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind, McDowell interrogates the notion of a 'logical space of reasons' as having location in the natural world. At times adopting an obscure and abstract prose style, McDowell nevertheless identifies specific anxieties concerning the realtion between mind and world: tensions between a Kantian sensible intuition (or 'minimal empiricism')--how our thoughts are answerable to and directed at the world--and the idea of receiving an impression (or Kantian humility) as a transaction with the world, placing it in a 'logical space of reasons.' So there is a tension between a normative context, that is, how the world 'impinges' on us, which is within the logical space of reasons, and empirical concepts that are supposed to be within the logical space of nature. But if we take Sellars seriously, identifying something as an impression--an economy of logical space of nature 'giving' or 'impinging' on the mind, then we are responsible to characterize just how an 'impinging world' is different from justifying or placing a verdict on empirical descriptions. McDowell's tension is between a 'minimal empiricism'--thought is answerable to a tribunal of experience--and how experience is indeed a tribunal, which attributes verdicts on thoughts.
Along the way, McDowell critiques the Myth of the Given, Davidson's coherentism, and argues for 'direct realism.'
McDowell has a flair for characterizing and 'exorcising' philosophical anxieties between empiricism and naturalism, and he employs creative metaphors that are extremely helpful, such as the 'seesaw' and a 'sideways on view.'
The first three lectures are most important, wherein he discusses conceptual and non-conceptual content. Here he engages the views of Sellars, Quine, Davidson, Evans, and Peacocke.
Mind and World is a masterful example of careful and thorough-going philosophy--at its best.
19 von 23 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen "Evolution of the Stone" 9. März 2004
Von Jeffrey Rubard - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Logical grammar concerns itself with "functors", devices that transform parts of language into other parts. For example, predicates combine with names of objects to form sentences. One of the less-celebrated functor types is the "subnector", which transforms sentences into terms: returning from the complex to the simple. *Mind and World* is a subnector of a book. The philosophical issues it engages with are central ones, but they are developed against a background of baroque analytical machinery. In other words, you really have to know in quite a bit of detail what several difficult figures had to say before McDowell's own concerns are at all clear.

This should not be surprising, given that the book was originally the 1991 John Locke Lectures at Oxford: these lectures are delivered yearly to professional philosophers who have formalized theories and intricate arguments well in hand, but are looking to re-evaluate the "big picture" of the philosophical enterprise. McDowell accordingly polemically bases his presentation on philosophers he was closely linked to in earlier work, Donald Davidson and Gareth Evans. McDowell has elsewhere spent a great deal of energy defending and refining their ideas, but the emphasis here is on his divergence from them concerning the role of concepts in our experience of the world.

Beginning from Wilfrid Sellars' rejection of givenness, yet serious about maintaining the objective purport of perception, McDowell aims to vindicate a view of experience derived from Kant: that experience requires the exercise of conceptual capacities (such as the ability to discriminate facts about the object which might be true of other objects) and an element corresponding to Kantian "intuitions", the influence of independent realities. McDowell argues that both elements are essential to including true, meaningful experience as a core element in our rational thought: misconstruing them as inessentially linked at will or heterogeneous and incapable of mixing leads to the reappearance of many traditional problems of epistemology we could otherwise opt out of.

McDowell then goes on to consider how such conceptual capacities could be part of the repertoire of a natural creature such as a human being, without appealing to an extra-natural "soul". His theory is derived from Aristotle's account of moral formation; Aristotle makes this out to be a matter of "second nature", which McDowell generalizes to cover the development of all "normative" conceptualization of the world, including our sense of action, under the heading of *Bildung* (a concept borrowed from the German pedagogical tradition). He ends his lectures by considering, in this light, Marx on the relationship of man to his world and Gadamer on the importance of tradition for rational thought.

This relates to McDowell's stated intention in the preface, that the whole work serve as a prolegomenon to the reading of Hegel's *Phenomenology of Spirit*. (In my opinion, the work fails to serve this purpose: the only Hegel quotation in the lectures is tendentiously interpreted, and Hegel's own treatment of *Bildung* in the *Phenomenology* makes it a critical and anti-traditional moment of the development of Spirit.) Those hoping for insight about historical materialism's relation to Hegel will be disappointed: in fact, as might be expected given his many favorable references to Gadamer, McDowell's own conclusions are in many ways diametrically opposite to those of the "Hegelian Marxists".

The lectures are followed by four postscripts, which expand upon technical disagreements between McDowell and other analytic philosophers mentioned in passing in the lectures. All of these will be of some interest to those who follow analytic philosophy closely, especially the interpretation of Wittgenstein: but there is less "systematic" content in these and the introduction (added for the paperback edition). One might hope for a "Briefer History of World" to make laypersons better acquainted with the important motifs of McDowell's philosophy; but unfortunately *Mind and World* will have to do as an introduction to McDowell's thought. Dense, but an essential part of contemporary philosophical discourse.
10 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen terse and elegant prose 1. Mai 2005
Von Jennifer R. Howell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
John McDowell's insight on how we acquire conceptual knowledge of the external world is brilliant. Basing his argument on the Kantian conception of receptitivity and spontaneity, John McDowell not only eases the philosophical anxiety of acquiring conceptual capacities and the epistemic role experience plays by destroying the need for the anxiety at all. I recommend this for any person interested in philosophy that is constructive and not just a response to someone else's question. McDowell, unlike most philosophers in our age, is not just picking at a niggling point, he is bringing fresh ideas to the philosophical table.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen an important difficult book 12. Februar 2014
Von Stanley Crowe - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I have been reading this book in a group that includes some philosophers, and that has been very helpful in coming to grips with it. My own interest in mind/world relations has its roots in romantic poetry, Wordsworth specifically, where experiences of nature that seem to be meaningful are presented and reflected on, but not with philosophical rigor. For all that, the rhetorical power of the poetry was compelling and it gave me much to think about. For all his lack of rigor, Wordsworth was as concerned as modern philosophers are with the claims of science to have privileged access to the world and to have developed a language that "represents" the world ("is made true by the world") better than any other. [Philosopher and scientist friends tell me that that idea of "science" is more a straw man set up by some philosophers than it is a very accurate account of what scientists really care about.] One way of combatting this vision of science is to largely ignore these imperialistic claims and to develop a way of thinking that avoids the difficulties of deciding what is or is not a "true representation," on the grounds that we can never find a stance from which to judge with certainty the truth of a claim about this or that "representation." So pragmatist and neo-pragmatist philosophers will talk of "intersubjective agreement" within a culture's language-games and not make claims about "truth" that go outside these parameters. The idea of what would be the case even if no human beings existed is not an idea that they find interesting. McDowell shares many of the views of such philosophers, but he has a healthy respect for science and believes that we cannot think clearly about knowledge unless we can give a naturalistic account of how our concepts are in fact connected to the world. Descartes and Kant have given unsatisfactory accounts -- accounts that flirt with a non-naturalistic "platonism" -- and yet McDowell resists the idea that our concepts are imposed on the world -- the famous "scheme-content" idea critiqued by Donald Davidson. He argues that in our experience as knowers there is ALWAYS a conceptual component, even in the passive reception of data from the world. An apple is known as an apple. It's not a piece of space-time on which we impose the concept apple. We are socialized through language into a world that we receive passively as conceptually loaded, but we also have as natural beings the capacity to construct concepts. It is with concepts that we can justify our beliefs and thus claim that what we believe is true. This idea that our conceptual powers are grounded in our experience of the world is "disenchanting" in a positive way, but our conceptual powers are what enable us to think about, construct, and critique "meanings" in what McDowell calls "the space of reasons" within which notions like justification are operative. There is an alternative space of "law" that explains causes and effects in the way we associate with natural science. Thus McDowell has accounted for a grounded empiricism that isn't crudely reducible to scientific explanation. Reductively, you can think of a table as "really" subatomic particles in certain relations to one another, but in McDowell's view there are things that are true of tables that aren't reducible to that and that belong to the "space of reasons." For a good review of the book by someone more philosophically acute than I am, see Jeffrey Rubard's review of March 2004. Rubard is aware of both the importance and the difficulty of the book. I'm not sure that I would have understood it, even to the limited extent that I do, without help.
1 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen college 2. Dezember 2012
Von Aaron - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Bought this book for a class I was taking in college, and liked the price compared to the book store
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar