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Me and Mine: The Life Story as Told to Louise Udall: Life Story of Helen Sekaquaptewa as Told to Louise Udall (Englisch) Taschenbuch – März 1969


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 262 Seiten
  • Verlag: University of Arizona Press (März 1969)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0816502706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816502707
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,3 x 2 x 19 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 1.384.849 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

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"An honest story of a life of integrity and genuine values, told with sensitivity." —Journal of Arizona History

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 4. August 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
About 1270 A.D., the Anasazi (now called Ancestral Pueblo) and Fremont were forced to evacuate Utah and Colorado because of a prolonged drought that lasted several decades. Scholars have studied these peoples' ruins, pictographs, human remains and artifacts to learn more about their culture. From these reports we now know what they ate and wore, where they lived and farmed, and how they made pottery, baskets and other crafts. We also have some insight into their belief systems, family relationships and how they defended themselves. Despite all this data, there are still many unanswered questions that must be resolved. Perhaps looking at the lifestyles of some of the descendants of these people will provide a few answers. Many of today's anthropologists believe Arizona's Hopi, Pueblo and Zuni people are the descendants of the Anasazi and Fremont. Helen's touching account of her childhood in a traditional Hopi village, provides a view of practices that may have been used or originated in the Great Basin more than a thousand years ago. Her narration describes the coming of age ceremonies in the kivas, the functions of the Kachinas (Kachinavaki), her parents' discipline, farming and cooking practices and her people's belief system. Sadly it also tells of the emotional pain she experienced when she was taken from her family and forced to attend the white man's schools. Despite her many challenges, she proved remarkably resilient and later describes how she and her husband struggled to teach their children an appreciation of both cultures. There is sadness in this story but no bitterness or hatred toward the white man or his culture.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Amazon.com: 10 Rezensionen
18 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
This is a great resource for western history classes! 4. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
About 1270 A.D., the Anasazi (now called Ancestral Pueblo) and Fremont were forced to evacuate Utah and Colorado because of a prolonged drought that lasted several decades. Scholars have studied these peoples' ruins, pictographs, human remains and artifacts to learn more about their culture. From these reports we now know what they ate and wore, where they lived and farmed, and how they made pottery, baskets and other crafts. We also have some insight into their belief systems, family relationships and how they defended themselves. Despite all this data, there are still many unanswered questions that must be resolved. Perhaps looking at the lifestyles of some of the descendants of these people will provide a few answers. Many of today's anthropologists believe Arizona's Hopi, Pueblo and Zuni people are the descendants of the Anasazi and Fremont. Helen's touching account of her childhood in a traditional Hopi village, provides a view of practices that may have been used or originated in the Great Basin more than a thousand years ago. Her narration describes the coming of age ceremonies in the kivas, the functions of the Kachinas (Kachinavaki), her parents' discipline, farming and cooking practices and her people's belief system. Sadly it also tells of the emotional pain she experienced when she was taken from her family and forced to attend the white man's schools. Despite her many challenges, she proved remarkably resilient and later describes how she and her husband struggled to teach their children an appreciation of both cultures. There is sadness in this story but no bitterness or hatred toward the white man or his culture. The "Journal of Arizona History" and the "Western Historical Quarterly" both feel her autobiography/biography is "an honest story of a life of integrity and genuine values, told with sensitvity" and "a remarkable view of contemporary Hopi life." I agree! I hope all of Utah's local and American history teachers will utilize this resource in their Native American units.
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Personal view 20. Juni 2005
Von ST - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This is an excellent resource for people who want a first-hand, authentic account of life for Native Americans in the 20th century.

This book gives an interesting perspective into the Hopi culture and the impact the outside culture has made on Helen's generation and those that followed. As a Native American, I can appreciate the struggles and triumphs that our elders had when faced with assimilation, stripping of our Native ways, and raising their families. I recommend this book for those that are seeking an intimate look into the Native American culture.
Read this AND Peltier 18. Januar 2013
Von Buddha Baby - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
7.  [Me and Mine: the Life Story of Helen Sekaquaptewa] by [[Louise Udall]]

When I was in grad school and we were studying different ethnic groups, the American Indian Movement was the largest part of our focus, and where current student sympathies were focused.  This is really the first time I have read a biography presenting the other perspective.  This book tells the life story of a Hopi woman who, after being kidnapped and sent to government schools, embraced that white way of life and believed the stories of Christianity to be better than the old traditional Hopi stories.  She continued living on reservations, experiencing the tension between the "hostiles" and the "friendlies".  As a "friendly" she was looked down upon, judged, and treated poorly by the "hostiles".  Her husband and children became active in reservation politics and activities, holding various offices and serving as police.  In this book published by the University of Arizona Press in 1962, she is presented as a successful story of assimilation into white culture through white education.  (She attended the Phoenix Indian School.) I tend to see it more as Stockholm Syndrome, although with my  mental health training, that would be my tendency.

There is a lot of detail about daily life for the Hopi on reservations in the early 1900s which I enjoyed learning about. Lengthy descriptions of marriage rituals are intriguing, for example.  Those descriptions made this book interesting reading for me.  I was glad to hear a different side of the story, although my admiration still lies with Leonard Peltier and the AIM.  That is probably just, perhaps, due to a personal interest in revolutionaries rather than any real knowledge about these issues.
Moving and inspiring! 4. Juni 2009
Von Reader - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I won't repeat what others have already said about the cultural and historical context of this autobiography of a Hopi woman. I will say that this is a fascinating, moving, and inspiring story, told in plain, unembellished language, of the life of Helen Sekaquaptewa, who was born in 1898 in the Hopi village of Old Oraibi on the Third Mesa. In vivid detail she recounts her home life from early childhood, the conflicts brought on the tribe by government intervention, her life at the government school, tribal divisions between the "Hostiles" (hostile to the government) and the "Friendlies" (friendly to the government), her courtship and marriage, and raising 10 children (and adopting two more!). The facts of her life are interspersed with descriptions of everything from how cornmeal is prepared, to the construction of a house, the building of a bread-baking oven for preparing the unique Hopi piki bread, and many other interesting details from daily life. Throughout, her stoic tone belies the great hardships and suffering she and her family endured. She also seems to have been a person of considerable integrity, generosity, good will, and a love of learning, and that these character traits saw her through a life fraught with almost unbelievable events, and that she, together with her loving husband, was able to instill these traits in her children. This is really a fascinating story and a great read. I was moved and inspired.
Intriguing portrayal of the Hopi culture and struggles in relatively modern times 9. April 2014
Von David M. Barker - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is so amazing to me. It is an account of Helen Sekaquaptewa and her struggles as she was hauled off to an "indian school" as well as many recollections of her life and culture. People interested in the native Americans and especially the Hopis will likely find this a very interesting story. Certain parts of it were so impressive to me, that I've quoted them on many occasions.
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