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Mao II: A Novel (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Mai 1992


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 256 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin Books; Auflage: Reissued Open Market Ed (1. Mai 1992)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0140152741
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140152746
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: Ab 18 Jahren
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,1 x 1,8 x 19,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (20 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 110.474 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Don DeLillo's follow-up to Libra, his brilliant fictionalization of the Kennedy assassination, Mao II is a series of elusive set-pieces built around the themes of mass psychology, individualism vs. the mob, the power of imagery and the search for meaning in a blasted, post-modern world. Bill Gray, the world's most famous reclusive novelist, has been working for many years on a stalled masterpiece when he gets the chance to aid a hostage trapped in a basement in war-torn Beirut. Gray sets out on a doomed, quixotic journey, and his disappearance disrupts the cloistered lives of his obsessed assistant and the assistant's companion, a former Moonie who has also become Bill's lover. This haunting, masterful novel won the PEN/Faulkner Award in 1992.

Pressestimmen

"This novel's a beauty. A vision as bold and a voice as eloquent and morally focused as any in American writing" --Thomas Pynchon

The writing is dazzling; the images, so radioactive that they glow afterward in our minds." --Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

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Einleitungssatz
Here they come, marching into American sunlight. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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Kundenrezensionen

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von A. Leung am 13. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Mao II left me vexed. Had I enjoyed the work, had I appreciated the brilliant literary tide, or had I been expecting a deeper plot and a more climatic epilogue?
First of all, before I begin my critiscism, I should tell you that Mao II contains paragraphs of such sweeping beauty that there are moments when the reader has to pause for breath. Never has Delillo's talent in contructing overhwhelmingly poetic and ironic sentences been more evident. This alone warrants purchase. The characters are superbly sculpted and conceived- they are a joy observe. Delillo has also created a world in this book; an alternate and compelling universe not far away from the real world but with an overdose of grimness and paradox. This too is a reader's delight.
Now is my slightly disgusted note. The overall shallowness of the plot is not hidden by any of the above. You keep on expecting something shocking to occur, a twist in the tale. Unfortunately, this never happens. A novel requires a plot. Mao II doesn't have one worth mentioning. If you are looking for a logical and plot-rooted book, this is probably not what you're looking for. There was so much potential for a climax, and brilliant point at which all chaos culiminates, but the oppurtunity was wasted. To be honest, this is unlike Delillo. There are also sections where Delillo overstays and goes on and on and on about a specific scene when enough has already been put forth. Rather than spending 10+ pages on a single, decidedly insignificant event, Delillo could have delved deeper and perhaps developed an event to break the monotone.
His only other marginally similar novel is White Noise, which, like Mao II, isn't typical Delillo. It isn't a plot that drives these novels, it is their hypnotic mastery.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 18. November 1997
Format: Taschenbuch
Perhaps the most effective moments (and there are many) in this brief novel occur when Don Delillo's characters ruminate over the cultural and political detritus of the late 20th century. Whether it be the observations of world-weary author of serious fiction as he travels towards war-torn Beirut, or the dreamy searches of a lapsed moonie walking pie-eyed through New York's Thompkins Square park, Delillo's disturbing observations are piled on with sparkling rapidity and conviction. Tangential analogies and arguments fly off each new thought like cosmic bottle rockets. By the book's finish, the reader--like the characters--walks wounded.
In Delillo's world, the opportunity for art's powerful reverberations seems to grow as the spirituality of the age declines. As plot, the story centers on a famously reclusive writer's decision to come out of his self-imposed cocoon in order both to free another writer held hostage in the middle east and to reveal his own face to an increasingly fascinated public. Prompted to action in part by his dissatisfaction with the book he's been struggling with for years, the writer allows a photographer to enter his sanctuary and capture his image on film.
But neither plot nor character are the strong suit here. What propels our interests is the sheer inertia of Delillo's vision and ideas. Around the central themes of revolution and popular culture as self-erasing forces are remarkable descriptive passages. The fatal crush of European football crowds, the appeal of faceless communism to the world's downtrodden, a mass marriage in a stadium, photography's relation to celebrity and death. Remarkable dialog, images and thoughts weave into a tumbling crazy-quilt of spiritual decay.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Yaumo Gaucho am 3. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
I am always torn between recommending Mao II or White Noise to those who want to try some DeLillo. Perhaps one can consider Mao II to be a watered-down White Noise: its characters and events are fleshed out more, and it reads more like a novel than a collection of clever aphorisms.
Mao II lacks the "edginess" of White Noise, but at the same time, we should applaud DeLillo of not harping on the theme of "America is really consumerist" for ever and ever. A writer of his skill can take on more challenging themes than that.
So what's it about? It's about individuals and crowds, and the frightening equivalence between the lone-wolf individual and the composite of crowds. Think repeating Mao portrait. Think of the name of the reclusive, lone-wolf main character: Bill Gray. There's also stuff about art, and of course DeLillo's ubiquitous "novelists are terrorists" insinuations.
This is probably my second-favorite DeLillo, and the one I'd recommend to someone looking for something like a traditional novel. It was very enjoyable, although perhaps not as intellectually searing as something like White Noise or (Pynchon's) Lot 49.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ethan Cooper am 28. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This fascinating novel probes the connection between isolation and mass movements in the modern world. In doing so, DeLillo is intensely personal, creating memorable characters who are visually and emotionally there, on the page, in full brilliance and confusion. He also employs sublime writing, which captures experiences, images, or ideas of individual isolation or mass movements and then juxtaposes them, showing weird but profound connections. My favorite pages are 149-153, where DeLillo describes New York City's Tompkins Square in the early nineties. Then, drug abusers, the mentally ill, and the homeless turned this lovely neighborhood square into a shambling, threatening shantytown. If you missed it, DeLillo has saved the moment.
The central figure in this book is Bill Gray, an isolated writer with a wide and discerning following. Anyone who wants to write might ponder two of his insights: "Writing is bad for the soul when you get right down to it. It protects your worst tendencies." (page198); or, "It was the writing that caused his life to disappear." (page 215).
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