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Mandarin Gate (Inspector Shan Tao Yun) [Kindle Edition]

Eliot Pattison
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)

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Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 25,35  
Taschenbuch EUR 16,14  


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Pattison dramatically portrays the bitter oppression suffered by the Tibetan people under Communist China in his excellent seventh novel featuring Chinese investigator Shan Tao Yun. Pattison movingly delineates the difficulties of seeking justice under a police state in this brilliantly constructed and passionate whodunit."--"Publishers Weekly" (starred review) "Pattison portrays the oppression of the Tibetan people with dramatic delicacy and rich insight. While "Mandarin Gate" is set in a locale farther away than most readers will ever dare venture, this mystery brings the plight of Tibet into sharp focus, weaving the region's cultural, social and political conflict into a compelling narrative." --CNN.com

Kurzbeschreibung

In Mandarin Gate, Edgar Award winner Eliot Pattison brings Shan back in a thriller that navigates the explosive political and religious landscape of Tibet.

In an earlier time, Shan Tao Yun was an Inspector stationed in Beijing. But he lost his position, his family and his freedom when he ran afoul of a powerful figure high in the Chinese government. Released unofficially from the work camp to which he'd been sentenced, Shan has been living in remote mountains of Tibet with a group of outlawed Buddhist monks. Without status, official identity, or the freedom to return to his former home in Beijing, Shan has just begun to settle into his menial job as an inspector of irrigation and sewer ditches in a remote Tibetan township when he encounters a wrenching crime scene. Strewn across the grounds of an old Buddhist temple undergoing restoration are the bodies of two unidentified men and a Tibetan nun. Shan quickly realizes that the murders pose a riddle the Chinese police might in fact be trying to cover up. When he discovers that a nearby village has been converted into a new internment camp for Tibetan dissidents arrested in Beijing's latest pacification campaign, Shan recognizes the dangerous landscape he has entered. To find justice for the victims and to protect an American woman who witnessed the murders, Shan must navigate through the treacherous worlds of the internment camp, the local criminal gang, and the government's rabid pacification teams, while coping with his growing doubts about his own identity and role in Tibet.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 952 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 318 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0312656041
  • Verlag: Minotaur Books (27. November 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B008E7SF94
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #88.392 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Mandarin Gate - an other Great Book ... 1. Dezember 2012
Von Miki101.Michaela TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Kindle Edition
... in the Inspector Shan Tao Yun Series.

We left our hero Shan a long time ago when he made his peace with Tan, the "Boss" of all the prisons in this remote Tibetan region. As he saved Tan from an accusation for murder, they made an aggreement - Shan returns Inspector - but of the water flows.
He has just begun to settle into his menial job as an inspector of irrigation and sewer ditches in this remote province of Tibet, when he stumbles over a cruel crime scene.
Across the grounds of an old Buddhist temple in restoration are the bodies of two unidentified men and a Tibetan nun. Shan quickly realizes that the murders are too difficult to resolve for the Chinese policemen who in fact are trying to cover the murders as "accidents". And new faces in search of a career appear and that is no good for our man Shan! But together with the "evil-doers" coming, there will be also a slice of solace for him...
And we will learn more about the Chinese methods of infiltrating the Tibetans - even into the ranks of the last remaining monks, lamas and abbots.
To arrive at the Dalai Lama, if possible...And maybe to kill him, too!

But You have to read the book by Yourselves to have an opinion of Your own!
I personnaly can only recommend it!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein weiteres highlight aus der Inspektor Shan Reihe 23. Februar 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Als langjähriger Fan der Tibet Bücher von Eliot Pattison, war ich glücklich ein neues Buch dieser Reihe zu entdecken! Es gibt wieder tragische Todesfälle und Morde zu klären und Shan ermittelt inTibet auch unter schwierigsten politischen Bedingungen. Lha rgyal lo!
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  71 Rezensionen
14 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Even when it's bad, it's good. 16. Januar 2013
Von Bill Donovan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Having read all the Shan novels, there's a lot to criticize in this one. Too much rushing about, coincidence, deus ex machina, plot complexity, comic book Chinese villains, and an almost Cook's Tour visitation of the places and people that made earlier books so powerful. Even so, I've got to admit I enjoyed it. As nutty as he can be, Shan is compelling as a character and investigator. I recommend Mandarin Gate, but you should start at the beginning of the series and work forward to appreciate everything this book encompasses. Incidentally, I have noticed in the jacket copy that the author is a frequent visitor to China. If so, the bureaucrats in Beijing are more tolerant than he makes them seem. No one has done more to broadcast the reprehensibility of Chinese communism than Elliot Pattison.
29 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Really Good Book 29. November 2012
Von Jon D. Katz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
I ordered this book on my Kindle when I saw the angry and mean-spirited reviews and comments directed at Amazon or the publisher but harming the writer instead. Like shooting an innocent bystander to make a point about the enemy. As an author I found it quite sad that the book is being pummeled because people are outraged that a multi-year creative project that will surely make the author little money will cost an extra $3 even though that is more than $10 below the list price. I wonder how small and angry and greedy we can get. How happy the Chinese government would be to see these reviews.
I started reading the book right away and I am happy to be the first person to report that this is a terrific read. It is not a happy read and the writer clearly is making a political point, more so than many mysteries. I worry about message mysteries. This one works. The atmosphere around Tibet brings home what is happening there in a powerful and evocative way and yet the book is still in the best traditions of the atmospheric foreign thriller. I think sometimes America is becoming a nation of angry bargain-hunters and discount seekers. This is a very gifted writer who should not have to suffer for that. I want to be honest - I have two chapters to go - but the book is a gripper, a journey to a very engaging and little written-about place. A great if disturbing yarn. Inspector Chan is a great hero. But a real review needs to go up, not just reviews like this. I hope people can remember that if the nasty bargain hunters become the dominant force in publishing, there will be few good books left to read. Thirteen bucks is quite a bargain for a book like this. I appreciate the book and the price.
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Not as Good as the Rest of the Series 7. Dezember 2012
Von lang23 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I was not happy with the Kindle book price, but I bought it anyway because I had enjoyed the other books in the series. Unfortunately, this book is not equal to the rest. The basic plot is good, but the story could really use some editing. The story is convoluted and improbable, with long stretches of boredom. The deeply spiritual feel of the previous novels is replaced with an occasional mantra and an unlikely sexual relationship. This was a disappointing purchase for me.
7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Inspector Shan gets my vote 30. Januar 2013
Von bookbuzz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Pacification is government-speak for repression. Governments who misuse this word annex weaker countries and along the way, build and fill gulags/prison camps with anyone who disagrees with their illegal land grabs. Never is this more evident than China's takeover of Tibet; a poor country, sure, but with a population of gentle spiritual people, sustained by an ancient culture and the Buddhist lamas who walk the countryside ministering to city dwellers and the isolated villages. Gentle and spiritual don't count for much in the modern world and Tibetans were unable to defend their country against the expansionist actions of the Chinese government which began in 1949 and continues to this present day. Human rights denied, they are now second class citizens in their own country. Equality of education, employment and housing only possible if you are a Chinese immigrant, Tibetans can only practice their religion under the aegis of government registered lamas.

Mandarin Gate, the latest in Edgar Award winning writer, Eliot Pattison's Inspector Shan mystery series, is set in the Tibetan countryside amidst the turmoil and violence of the Chinese occupation. The seventh in the series it's my debut Inspector Shan read and curious as to how it measured up to the previous six books, I did something I rarely do before reading/reviewing a book - read other reviewer's comments. The general consensus being that Mandarin Gate was as good if not better than the previous books, there was an ongoing debate about the price; some reviewers thought it was too high. As I don't believe price is, or should be of any relevance when reviewing a book, I was a bit bemused by the amount of space some reviewers devoted to Mandarin Gate's cost.

So, is it any good? It certainly is - Eliot Pattison's book succeeds on all fronts - intriguing mystery/political thriller with an unusual setting and plot, I liked Mandarin Gate and its main character, Inspector Shan, a lot.

In previous books, Shan Tao Yun was a Beijing Police Inspector but as sometimes happens in public service, he offended a high ranking government official and not long after, woke up in a prison camp. Released from internment, Shan begins life anew in the mountains of Tibet, his companions: outlawed Buddhist monks. Prevented from returning to his home and family in Beijing, Shan is employed as a lowly Inspector of Irrigation and Sewer Ditches. When you think about it, not a bad job for a policeman; both occupations require a lot of digging before an investigation is completed.

During the course of his work Shan discovers a multiple murder scene in the ruins of an old Buddhist convent. Two men and a woman have been killed, the men's bodies horribly mutilated. The three bodies, lying in a pool of blood, have been arranged in a U shaped pattern, the woman at the feet of the men. One man's head has been severed, the other man's head has no face, the flesh raw and bloodied from the hacking blows of a heavy blade. Despite the murderer's efforts to disfigure the men's bodies, Shan is sure they are Chinese nationals. A bullet hole in the woman's chest, Shan realizes she is Tibetan and examines her clothing; under her work clothes he recognizes the maroon robe of a Buddhist nun. At the ancient place of worship, a Buddhist nun has been murdered and placed under the feet of two Chinese men. Why? Shan has no time to conjecture on the motive behind these savage killings, the police have arrived and he must flee or face imprisonment.

A nearby village has been turned into an internment camp for Tibetan dissidents. Shan knows any investigation he starts to get justice for the victims slaughtered amidst the convent ruins will have to be done very carefully indeed, lest he join the dissidents in the gulag. An American woman who witnessed the murders in jeopardy, Shan steers a dangerous course through the murky waters of government pacification policy and the machinations of local criminals to uncover the truth - a rare commodity in Chinese controlled Tibet.

Absorbed in the story, I especially liked the glimpses of Tibetan culture and descriptions of the countryside that Eliot Pattison interleaved throughout Mandarin Gate's exciting plot. For anyone's money (thought the price was quite moderate for such excellent writing) Mandarin Gate is a good read.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Eliot Pattison delivers again, for me 1. Mai 2013
Von Papillon - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I loved this book, as I have loved all of his Shan mysteries. Pattison seems to be able to capture me and transport me to Tibet with his beautiful, sensitive and very smart way of writing. As with all his other mysteries, he kept me guessing until the end and then surprised the heck out of me. There are scenes of torture, carnage and desperation beyond my comfort zones but also descriptions of deep love and commitment to beliefs that Pattison can give better than a lot of other authors. Highly recommend.
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