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Man on the Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970s [Kindle Edition]

Tom Doyle

Kindle-Preis: EUR 9,99 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 6,78  
Kindle Edition, 17. Juni 2014 EUR 9,99  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 18,95  
Taschenbuch EUR 12,94  

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

'[An] excellent and insightful biography ... he manages to get to the heart of McCartney's dilemma ... a fascinating read' - Scots Whay Hae 'Man On The Run: Paul McCartney in the 1970s is lovingly researched and expertly written by someone who was not afraid to push the boundaries in order to get to the untouched juicy bits. This isn't just a factual list of already documented events, this is an accessible and reader friendly must-have book written from an honest and open perspective that makes McCartney's already extensively documented life seem fresh and new' - Josh Gill's Blog 'Doyle makes sense of a stoned shaggy dog story that has none of the narrative neatness of the Beatles' rise and fall' - Guardian 'Starting with the painful disintegration of the Beatles, Doyle examines the next decade in McCartney's unimaginably odd existence, from his post-hippy farm idyll with wife Linda to the turbulent highs and lows of Wings ... most compelling is the book's portrait of a man in a position that doesn't come with a guidebook, playing it by ear. ****' - Q Magazine 'The go-to guy if you want to coax confessions from a superstar, Doyle writes without agenda' - Mojo 'Doyle's writing is as beautiful as any McCartney tune' - Scotsman '[Doyle] manages to say something new about a public figure about whom countless thousands of books and articles have been written, and he says it well... McCartney emerges as more admirable than many readers might have imagined - and more human, too' - Kirkus> 'Tom Doyle's detailed chronicle, which includes rare interviews with McCartney and former Wings members, portrays a band that was far more contentious than eager-to-please hits like 1976's 'Let 'Em In' had us believe, fronted by a legend who wanted to be both boss and buddy. The book is larded with tales of Seventies rock-star excess, Paul and Linda's love of weed, docked paychecks, and grousing musicians' - Rolling Stone 'Well-researched but still breezy and engaging, the book offers a comprehensive tour of the shaggy, bleary-eyed decade when the hardest-working ex-Beatle reached the zenith of his creative and commercial success... Man on the Run makes an excellent contribution to the burgeoning literature devoted to McCartney's post-Beatles career' - The Boston Globe > 'In the 1970s, a depressed, heavy-drinking Paul McCartney walked away from the Beatles and reinvented himself as the leader of another hitmaking rock 'n' roll band. A new book by longtime Q magazine contributing editor Tom Doyle about that turbulent period in the legendary rock star's life, Man on the Run, catches him in mid-flight' - Billboard

Kurzbeschreibung

An illuminating look at the most tumultuous decade in the life of a rock icon—the only McCartney biography in decades based on firsthand interviews with the ex-Beatle himself.
 
As the 1970s began, the Beatles ended, leaving Paul McCartney to face the new decade with only his wife Linda by his side. Holed up at his farmhouse in Scotland, he sank into a deep depression. To outsiders, McCartney seemed like a man adrift—intimidated by his own fame, paralyzed by the choices that lay before him, cut loose from his musical moorings. But what appeared to be the sad finale of a glorious career was just the start of a remarkable second act.
 
The product of a long series of one-on-one interviews between McCartney and Scottish rock journalist Tom Doyle, Man on the Run chronicles Paul McCartney’s decadelong effort to escape the shadow of his past, outrace his critics, and defy the expectations of his fans. From the bitter and painful breakup of the Beatles to the sobering wake-up call of John Lennon’s murder, this is a deeply revealing look at a sometimes frightening, often exhilarating period in the life of the world’s most famous rock star.
 
Sensing that he had nowhere to go but up, Paul McCartney started over from scratch. With emotional—and musical—backing from Linda, he released eccentric solo albums and embarked on a nomadic hippie lifestyle. He formed a new band, Wings, which first took flight on a ramshackle tour of British university towns and eventually returned Paul to the summit of arena rock superstardom.
 
In Man on the Run, Doyle follows McCartney inside the recording sessions for Wings’ classic album Band on the Run—and provides context for some of the baffling misfires in his discography. Doyle tracks the dizzying highs and exasperating lows of a life lived in the public spotlight: the richly excessive world tours, the Japanese drug bust that nearly ended McCartney’s career, his bitter public feuds with his erstwhile Beatle bandmates, and the aftermath of an infamous drug-and-alcohol-fueled jam session where McCartney helped reconcile the estranged John Lennon and Yoko Ono.
 
For Paul McCartney, the 1970s were a wild ride with some dark turns. Set against the backdrop of a turbulent decade, Man on the Run casts the “sunny Beatle” in an entirely new light.

Praise for Man on the Run
 
““Tom Doyle’s detailed chronicle, which includes rare interviews with McCartney and former Wings members, portrays a band that was far more contentious than eager-to-please hits like 1976’s ‘Let ’Em In’ had us believe, fronted by a legend who wanted to be both boss and buddy. The book is larded with tales of Seventies rock-star excess, Paul and Linda’s love of weed, docked paychecks, and grousing musicians.”Rolling Stone
 
“Well-researched but still breezy and engaging, the book offers a comprehensive tour of the shaggy, bleary-eyed decade when the hardest-working ex-Beatle reached the zenith of his creative and commercial success. . . . Man on the Run makes an excellent contribution to the burgeoning literature devoted to McCartney’s post-Beatles career.”The Boston Globe
 
“In the 1970s, a depressed, heavy-drinking Paul McCartney walked away from The Beatles and reinvented himself as the leader of another hitmaking rock ’n’ roll band. A new book by longtime Q magazine contributing editor Tom Doyle about that turbulent period in the legendary rock star’s life, Man on the Run, catches him in mid-flight.”Billboard


From the Hardcover edition.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 6305 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 288 Seiten
  • Verlag: Ballantine Books (17. Juni 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00HKVHY8I
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #201.284 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  119 Rezensionen
50 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Man on the Run 8. September 2013
Von S Riaz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
In the same way as, after the breakup of the Beatles, Paul McCartney turned away from performing any songs from that era; after the demise of Wings, he often seemed reluctant to discuss his post-Beatles band until recently. In this book, author Tom Doyle, takes an in-depth look at this period - from the first solo album, through to the Japanese drug bust and the murder of John Lennon, which effectively caused the end of Wings.

The book begins with the messy Beatles breakup, including the public feud with Lennon and Paul's decision to legally file to dissolve the Beatles. The legal ramifications led to financial problems, much soul searching over his decision and, if not a total breakdown, certainly depression and a loss of confidence in his abilities. It also led to the birth of Wings. It had been an idea Paul had touted within the Beatles - to go on the road and play small gigs again. Unable to get his former bandmates to agree (probably sensibly), Paul decided to form a new band and do it himself. Of course, one (if not THE) most contentious issue was Linda joining the band, but one thing that does stand out in this book is that, for all the troubles Paul faced during the decade of the 1970's, his problems were not marital ones. While John and Yoko seperated, and George and Ringo both got divorced, Paul and Linda were solidly a couple throughout their marriage - no rumour of any breakup or possibility of divorce, or even affairs, being mentioned. Linda seemed determined to keep temptation from Paul's door - banning other Wings members from bringing wives and girlfriends along; but Linda was in the band because Paul wanted her and he appreciated her commitment, when he knew she would rather be at home with the kids.

Although there was little that was actually new to me in this book, it is a good retelling and analysis of Paul's career in the 1970's. It take Wings from a fledgling group doing small university gigs, to the first European tour; through several lineups and onto success with the Wings Over America tour. It also highlights the drugs problems - busts, arrests and substance abuse within members of the band, which plagued them during this time. Every album is mentioned and appraised, including some huge hits, other misguided record choices and a few forgettable singles.

Of much interest to fans, of course, is Paul's relationship with John Lennon. The decade began with John's star in the ascendent - huge albums, such as "Plastic Ono Band" and "Imagine" and vicious verbal attacks on his former bandmate. Interestingly, though, is the way John essentially blew hot and cold throughout this decade - using intermediaries to send letters to Paul, both praising and damning him in interviews and, in later years, causing Paul to cut contact for a while after some admittedly 'frightening' phone calls. It was obvious that the press used one against the other and, also obvious, that John had some jealousy of Paul's success - both musically and financially. By the time the pair met up again in 1974, Lennon was living in La La Land with Ringo, Harry Nilsson and Keith Moon (not a great combination for a healthy lifestyle). Having split for a time with Yoko, John was living with May Pang. He was threatened with expulsion from the States, suffering lawsuits and financial problems, his marriage and his career in freefall. Although it looked at the beginning of the decade that Paul had been left behind by his bandmate's solo music, now he had "Band on the Run", "Live and Let Die", a new band and a successful tour behind him. He was successful in his own right and, frankly, shocked when he visited Lennon and Nilsson at the "Pussycats" sessions. For anyone who has heard the jam recorded that day, "A toot and a snore in '74", it is obvious that musically nothing worth listening to came out of John and Paul playing together again. However, as Lennon said later, the others playing were more interested in watching, "me and Paul." To his credit, despite the arguments, Paul had spoken to Yoko and helped reunite John and Yoko; a fact which Yoko has also spoken about in interviews.

Overall, then, this book looks at a little documented era of Paul's life. A time when he reinvented himself; forging a new musical career from the shadow of the Beatles. Although all the former Beatles tired of reunion rumours and questions about each other, they only really came to terms with their legacy,it seems, after the death of John Lennon and the realisation that their Beatles past could never be put behind them. Many people forget that McCartney had a huge solo career - that he had massive World tours without playing more than one or two Beatles songs and that his Wings career would be enough to be proud of, if that was all he had done. Filled with interviews, revealing insights and unbiased analysis of the man and his music, this is a great addition to any fan's bookshelf.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Junior McCartney fan 9. Juni 2014
Von Carrie Waterston - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Like many here, I've loved the Beatles my whole life - however, I'm younger than many, having been born actually after the Beatles broke up. Consequently I must rely more on published/written accounts of things that happened, rather than relying on my own memory or contemporaneous discussions with friends and family members.

My interest in McCartney in particular began in earnest after seeing him play live a few times in the recent past, and buying very nearly all of his solo albums, a job in itself. Which piqued my curiosity - exactly how *does* a man get into the Guinness Book of Records for being among the most beloved recording artists of all time? So I began reading what I could get my hands on in actual interviews with the man, as opposed to descriptions of his career penned by others.

I always felt Sir Paul got a bad rap for his reaction to the Lennon murder and it's actually painful to read about this in detail - the world lost so much on that day in 1980. As much fun as the rest of the book was to read - drug busts, details about early Wings tours, Paul's relationship with Linda, etc - I confess that I'm left wanting more more more - how exactly did Michael Jackson gain possession of the Beatles' publishing rights? This is a narrative, not an autobiography, but failing that ever being published this is very nearly as good as it gets.

Of course, most of the book is and was intended to be told from the perspective of the Gilded One - it's interesting to hear his reasoning behind the multiple lawsuits that ended the most beloved band of all time. Yoko didn't break up the Beatles, Alan Klein did, and I feel this part of the story often gets short shrift in the popular consciousness.

The writing is absolutely spot on as well - Doyle is a terrific writer fond of the sly turn of phrase, which is incredibly difficult to do without taking the focus from the subject of the work. Later I'll probably search out some of his books on other topics.

Loved the book but I'm afraid this is just going to feed my addiction. ;) Your mileage may vary.
18 von 23 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Well-written bio on a surprisingly neglected bit of the ex-Beatle's career 5. Juni 2014
Von Kelly L. Norman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
I have read a lot of biographies of Paul McCartney and of the Beatles. A LOT. In fact after I clicked on the vine page to have this one sent to me, I thought, "What have I gotten myself into?" I mean, my email is still sirpaulfan@...., but how many times can anyone read about the same things over and over without getting a little bored?

I needn't have worried, for the primary reason that Tom Doyle is a talented writer. And he seems to have built up a rapport with Mr. McCartney such that the latter was ready to let his hair down in their interviews. This is quite a feat, because Paul's breezy "flip" public image hides a life with no small amount of pain, as well as grinding hard work. The line by line interviews, which are woven seemlessly into the storyline, I especially liked.

Also, this is first and foremost a biography of a man between the ages of twenty-nine and thirty nine, and Doyle is quite right when he indicates in the forward that there hasn't been a lot written about McCartney during that time. (In fact, my experience is that every one of the biographies I've read to date, besides this one, have provided a lot of detail, along with more or less true trivia, about the 60s, then says some paraphrase, not lengthy, such as: "And after the Beatles broke up, Paul started another band. It was never as great as the Beatles, though." THE END. The Wings years, or in other words, the 70s, are like a bookmark dividing "The Beatles" and "Life post John and Linda." Despite the fact that Mr. McCartney was very, very active (as he continues to be) all that time. Doyle first of all covers one of the most difficult times: Paul detoxing from both the Beatles and heroin and went through a painful assessment and reassessment of himself. He tells Doyle that he gives Linda the credit for giving him the confidence to get through that.

Then there is a much deserved treatment of Wings from start to finish: each lineup (there were a few), each recording, each tour. All the interpersonal problems, all of Paul's difficulty in keeping them hard at work and keeping them together, and the final burst of the bubble as Paul walks into customs in Tokyo with a bag full of pot inside his suitcase, and spends the next few days in jail, destroying any hope of the Wings tour of Japan ever happening.

Very fun to read, and an as yet unused path through the seventies.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent, Well-Research Macca Addition 19. Juni 2014
Von Todd and In Charge - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
I've been a hardcore Beatle and solo fan/collector since forever and was actively following every solo move from each ex-Beatle through the 70s, picking up rare releases, singles, bootlegs etc. So my knowledge base coming to a book like this is substantial.

Yet I found many new nuggets of information, as well as really enjoyed the way Doyle composed a compelling narrative using old and new interviews, youtube clips, and good old fashioned research. I'm a huge fan of the masterpiece Ram, much of Red Rose, Venus and Mars, and I like many of the "throwaways" often derided that I find charming, such as cuts from Wild Life, the first McCartney album, "Seaside Woman," etc.

I got to relive much of this in this fun history, along with learning more about the difficulties in Paul's post-Beatle career, such as fights with Wings band members, pot arrests, and the like.

A must-read for any Macca fan!
6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen An interesting read on a decade in Sir Paul's life that most may not know much about 19. Juni 2014
Von T. Scarillo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
“Man on the Run” sheds some light on a portion of Paul McCartney’s life that, while I’ve heard much of the music from, I really didn’t actually know much about (at least, not to the extent of what I know about the Beatles years). Wings grew to become quite successful from about 1972 to 1976, but surprisingly to me, this was an extremely up and down, tumultuous time in McCartney’s life – I had no idea just how depressed he was after the breakup of the Beatles, and his desire to reinvent himself early-on by playing lots of impromptu, low-key gigs all over the UK. It seems inconceivable today (what with his megabucks tours) that he was having liquidity troubles due to the freezing of Beatles accounts until their management issues could be worked out, and that someone as upbeat as he seems to be was capable of an occasional outburst. One thing I would’ve appreciated a bit more was delving into the actual recording of some of these early solo/Wings albums (they kinda just ‘appear’ in the narrative, and then the band is out on the road; there was some good info on the recording of “Band on the Run” in Lagos, Nigeria, though but that has already been well-told elsewhere). Wings is probably overdue for a critical reassessment as several of their albums were pilloried in the critical rock press at the time of release and in intervening years, but in retrospect, there is some solid work there (especially the “Band on the Run” and “Venus and Mars” albums), and some very capable players passed thru the band/McCartney’s circle (Denny’s Laine & Seiwell, Jimmy McCulloch and Henry McCullough, etc), and added to the music. I was unaware of the circumstances of Jimmy McCulloch’s falling out with Paul (and his premature death in 1979). You might also find it surprising how much contact Paul had with John Lennon during this period - I had assumed it was minimal. For sure, it was a decade that was decidedly up and down.
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