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Making up the Mind: How the Brain Creates Our Mental World [Kindle Edition]

Chris Frith
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

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Kindle Edition EUR 20,99  
Kindle Edition, 20. Mai 2013 EUR 20,99  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 106,03  
Taschenbuch EUR 30,70  


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"This book presents a clear description of the current neuroscientific view of the relationship between the brain and the mind." (Brain Science Podcast, May 2009) "Neuroscience and psychology often struggle to answer the really interesting questions about the mind, but in this fascinating book, Chris Frith shows that science can finally start explaining how and why we experience the world as we do. Anyone interested in human nature - not just the nuts and bolts of neural circuits - will find his storytelling compelling. Frith delves into topics such as delusions, illusions, imagination and imitation, bringing clarity and insight to the simplest abservations and most complex experiments alike." (New Scientist) "Making up the Mind is an interesting book to everybody who wants to learn more about how the brain gives rise to our mental experiences...As Frith himself depicts in a sort of framing story, you will easily find yourself talking about these ideas at your next dinner party, as well as use it for serious considerations on the brain or as a toolbox for next term's essay. A stimulating new book by a distinguished scientist who knows what he is talking about." (Metapsychology Online Reviews) "Frith has produced an enthralling discussion on the subtle links between mind and brain, sometimes with humorous liaisons between himself, as narrator, and others who might be labelled as sceptics, unbelievers." (Psychologist) "Stands apart from many that have been written lately ... For those who have time to read only one book ... this should be it. Essential." (Choice Reviews)

Rezension

Oliver Sacks"Making up the Mind is a fascinating guided tour through the elusive interface between mind and brain written by a pioneer in the field. The authors obvious passion for the subject shines through every page."
–V. S. Ramachandran

"I soon made up my mind that this is an excellent, most readable and stimulating book. The author is a distinguished neuroscientist working especially on brain imaging."
–RL Gregory, Experimental Psychology

"Chris Frith, one of the pioneers in applying brain imaging to study mental processes, has written a brilliant introduction to the biology of mental processes for the general reader. This superb book describes how we recreate in our brains a representation of the external world. Clearly and beautifully written, this book is for all who want to learn about how the brain gives rise to the mental phenomenon of our lives. A must read!"
–Eric R. Kandel, M.D.

"Important and surprising. The brain will never seem the same again."
–Lewis Wolpert, University College London

"Frith’s luminously intelligent book...raises interesting questions about how it is possible to make serious scientific progress, on the borders of metaphysics, while still thinking inside a framework that is an ontological and epistemological muddle."
–Raymond Tallis, Brain


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1674 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 248 Seiten
  • Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell; Auflage: 1 (20. Mai 2013)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00CY5M8HW
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #318.648 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Who's in charge in there? 18. Juni 2008
Format:Taschenbuch
It's hard to resolve where the best place to encounter Chris Frith might be - a classroom, a pub, or a party. In this book, the last is set as a means of providing exchanges between a working cognitive neuroscientist and people from the humanities and other sciences - English and physics, in this case. Frith goes to some effort to show how many misconceptions about how the mind works still exist in our society. He wants to set those right, and does so splendidly in this book on the workings of the brain. With a style one might almost describe as jocular, Frith reveals how the brain deals with the world outside and within us.

Frith had the good fortune to enter the field as the new, non-intrusive methods of brain imaging were emerging. Big, cumbersome and expensive, these tools, the PET, fMRI and CAT scanning devices soon came into more widespread use. These machines could map the living brain, while patients could be queried or given tests to assist in determining which brain areas were active at a given time. Frith describes these tools as moving brain studies from a "soft" science to a "hard" science in which detailed measurements could be made. Previously, it was either guess-work, or brains could be analysed only after a patient's death.

What has emerged from these studies is a very serious challenge to what we call "reality" and our perception of it. The brain does many things without our realising it. Apart from the obvious ones like keeping the heart and lungs pumping, there is the issue of what we "see". We like to think that when we "look" at something or somebody, we are seeing a continuous image. That's simply not the case. Beyond the fact that the eye undergoes a rapid shifting motion called "saccading", it's also converting photons into electrical signals.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Glimpses into the delusional mind 8. August 2007
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
The second statement of the Four Noble Truth (Buddhas first lesson) goes: 'the main cause of suffering is the delusional mind of man'.
Frith (Principal Investigator at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging) gives us some insight how the human mind works with Conceptions and Modells with shortcuts and predictions. The 5th chapter is 'Our Perception of the World Is a Fantasy that Coincides with Reality' and he proves it.
In his book he demonstrates by means of very well selected and detailed examples how the brain makes up the mind, how we make up our world and our self.
His book is very well written and for the educated layperson especially if the reader wants to understand how his own sight and feeling of the world is fabricated.
This book is not about consciousness (Frith)
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Auch für Fachleute... 9. Juni 2009
Von SFZ
Format:Taschenbuch
Der Altmeister gibt sich die Ehre - sehr unterhaltsam, sehr britisch, sehr lehrreich (wundervolle Einführung ins Bayes-Theorem). Man darf nur die Seitenhiebe auf seine Strohgegner-Geisteswissenschaftlerin nicht zu ernst nehmen...
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Wer da wohl entscheidet - es oder ich? 5. Februar 2009
Format:Taschenbuch
Für Leute, die kein Problem damit haben, dass uns unser Hirn ständig Schnippchen schlägt.
Superinteressant, auch im Englischen gut lesbar, wenn auch nur für geübte.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  19 Rezensionen
122 von 125 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Smashing 16. August 2007
Von T. Bachman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Every once in a while, I read a book which performs a sort of miraculous feat. It sets out to do the seemingly impossible, and then not only does so, but does so in a way which seems almost effortless.

Chris Frith's book "The Making Up The Mind" is like this. Its task is nothing less than to explain "how the brain creates our mental world" to a popular but educated audience - and in the space of 193 pages, he actually does it. Along the way, he references dozens of the most important studies on conscious/unconscious perception, computation, self-image construction, etc., extracting from them their most relevant points, and weaves them into an engaging narrative characterized as much by its clarity as by its genial tone.

A few particular personal high points in this book: Frith's tidy explanation of Bayesianism, his remarks on the inevitability of pre-judging, the brain as a cultural organ, and most of all, his chapter on prediction/evaluation mechanisms.

When I started the book, I kept a pencil handy so as to underline all the most important sentences/concepts. By the time I was done reading it, my book looked like a band of hypergraphic monkeys had gotten hold of it, so full of circles and lines and scribbled notes was it.

Verdict: five big stars.
80 von 81 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Phenomenal! Absolutely phenomenal!! 28. Dezember 2007
Von Zachary A. Kroger - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
When I first found this book, it took some convincing before I bought it. The book is fairly expensive, and from looking at the chapter sections, the book seems to promise to explain the impossible... and in a very short space.

However, there was one other review, which was very positive. I then learned that the book had been positively reviewed by both V.S. Ramachandran and Oliver Sacks. So I bought it, and I sure am glad I did!

To put it bluntly, this is by far the best book on the brain that I have ever read. Don't get me wrong, I love the books by Sacks, Ramachandran, Pinker, etc and recommend them to people all of the time. But as for overall readability, wittiness (I laughed out loud numerous times), and extremely clear explanations of complicated topics, this book is tops. There were a few things in the book I already knew about, but Firth explained them again in new ways I hadn't considered. I was constantly blown away the awesome amount of information in each chapter.

The book does exactly as the title promises, and explains from basically the ground up, what different parts of the brain do, how they do it, why they do it, and how we know... and how this all comes together to make the mental world that we experience. He addresses all of the common questions and objections that arise during discussing such topics, and even addresses why many scientists give psychologists such a hard time about being "soft scientists", and why this is changing.

So in conclusion, if you know nothing about the brain, or even if you know a lot about the brain, read this book. I am sure that everyone will learn a TON from it, and enjoy it immensely. I guarantee that you wont regret it.
35 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Who's in charge? 18. Juni 2008
Von Stephen A. Haines - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
It's hard to resolve where the best place to encounter Chris Frith might be - a classroom, a pub, or a party. In this book, the last is set as a means of providing exchanges between a working cognitive neuroscientist and people from the humanities and other sciences - English and physics, in this case. Frith goes to some effort to show how many misconceptions about how the mind works still exist in our society. He wants to set those right, and does so splendidly in this book on the workings of the brain. With a style one might almost describe as jocular, Frith reveals how the brain deals with the world outside and within us.

Frith had the good fortune to enter the field as the new, non-intrusive methods of brain imaging were emerging. Big, cumbersome and expensive, these tools, the PET, fMRI and CAT scanning devices soon came into more widespread use. These machines could map the living brain, while patients could be queried or given tests to assist in determining which brain areas were active at a given time. Frith describes these tools as moving brain studies from a "soft" science to a "hard" science in which detailed measurements could be made. Previously, it was either guess-work, or brains could be analysed only after a patient's death.

What has emerged from these studies is a very serious challenge to what we call "reality" and our perception of it. The brain does many things without our realising it. Apart from the obvious ones like keeping the heart and lungs pumping, there is the issue of what we "see". We like to think that when we "look" at something or somebody, we are seeing a continuous image. That's simply not the case. Beyond the fact that the eye undergoes a rapid shifting motion called "saccading", it's also converting photons into electrical signals. The brain must interpret the incoming messages and make sense of them. When it finally sends a message to the frontal cortex, an "image" has been recorded and you are now in a position to react to it.

The many vagaries in the operation of the brain in creating the mind, lead many in the humanities to scorn cognitive neuroscience. Frith uses his English professor as a foil to challenge the value of his work. "You can't pin down the mind like a specimen in a display case", he has her intone. But Frith's work and that of the many researchers he cites, demonstrates the fallacy of believing that we are in control of our minds.

Vision is but one area where the brain must interpret input and build a result for you to understand. The brain has developed a number of tricks to help itself produce something meaningful from what the senses tell it. The chief resource in this mental technique is memory. From our earliest years, the brain has been recording and cataloguing various inputs to assist in the formation of what we think we perceive. A point that must be remembered through all this is that the catalog isn't something that the devices can pinpoint for us to analyse. Memory, though it has fairly well-defined pathways, is part of a very dynamic and elusive system. What it produces for our conscious use is highly arbitrary. The brain may serve up memory images almost as a whim. Very little of it is under our control, yet we continue to assert we are given "free will". Frith doesn't deny there's an element of will in how we think, but it's anything but "will" in an absolute sense. And we must be cautious about how free of constraints it is. Since the brain is faced with countless episodes of false information, such as optical illusions, those memories we depend upon as the foundation for decisions, "free will" comes close to being meaningless.

For the person new to the ideas and research being done in how the brain works, this book is the ideal starting point. It's invaluable for the concepts it introduces and explains - so far as is known, and does so in a compelling manner. While he chides the English teacher on the one hand, he pays attention to her comments as a lever for introducing a topic needing further explanation. And his explanations, while challenging some long-held philosophical notions, demonstrate how much we've learned, yet still need to know about the brain. A fine gift for a student seeking a career path. What we learn about the brain tells us a great deal about who we are. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
28 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen An enlightening read 17. Mai 2008
Von Aaron P. Lange - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
When I read through the prologue of this book, I thought it would be about consciousness, and how activity in the brain explains why we have the experiences that we do.

I was wrong. This book is not about consciousness. Instead, Chris Frith attempts to explain how our mental world arises from activity in our brain. He does this not from wild speculation, but from a horde of neuroscientific evidence. He stops short of explaining why our experience of our mental world is at it is. For example, Frith shows that colour is all in your mind, but he does not explain why the colour red appears to you as it does.

The book is divided into three parts. In part 1, Frith shows, using strong scientific evidence, that our experience of direct, complete and immediate access to the physical world (through our senses) is nothing but an illusion created by the brain. There is a real world out there, but we don't experience the real world - we experience our brain's coarse model of the real world.

In part 2, Frith explains how our brain develops good and useful models of the world. Roughly, this is done by making predictions based on an existing model (prior knowledge/assumptions) about the world, examining evidence about the errors in these predictions, and updating the model in light of these errors. This iterative process is the essence of learning. All this work is done subconsciously, of course - we just experience our brain's ever-changing model of reality. At the end of this part of the book (chapter 6), Frith explains that it is by modelling the physical world that we can model the minds of others, and that our access to the mental world is as indirect as our access to the physical world.

In part 3, Frith explains that our brains develop good models of other people's minds using the same scientific process (described in the previous paragraph) by which our brains develop good models of the physical world. This process allows us to (sort-of) understand other people, and to share ideas with them.

In the epilogue, rather than try to explain consciousness, Frith offers speculation on what consciousness - and the associated illusion that we are free agents - is for. He argues it gives us reason to reward and punish, thus it facilitates cooperation. I personally feel this is the weakest part of the book (or perhaps I just missed the point), but it provides interesting food for thought.

Overall, the book is well structured and an easy read for the intelligent layman. Frith writes with a very casual and informal style and a good dose of humour. There are a lot of typos that will stop you in your tracks, but the intended meaning is always clear from the context.

The book is perhaps a little brief, but I am satisfied with what I've learnt. Since reading the book a few days ago, I've actually noticed that I "see" things differently now. Like when Neo can "see the matrix" at the end of the film The Matrix, I feel like I can (to some degree) see through some of the illusions created by my brain as I go about my life.
26 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Neat Book About How the Brain Models the World 23. Mai 2009
Von henry000 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
For whatever reason, I had a hard time in trying to understand exactly what the main thesis of the book is. What exactly does the book's subtitle 'How the Brain Creates Our Mental World' mean? Is it about the physical/neurological mechanics of how the brain works? Is it about what conciousness is? Is it about psychology?

I think I understand it now. The theme of the book is rather simple - everything that you are aware of (the physical world, other people's minds and your own body), are actually models created by the brain.

And how does the brain creates these models? Using various ways such Baysian mechanics, predictions-feedback and associative learning.

The writing style is quite enlightening - full of humour and littered with antedotes, facts and interesting experiments. The use of the English Professor is simply brilliant and engaging. The numerous footnotes can be rather disruptive to the flow of reading at times.

I wish the book could do more with the 'serious' side of science - such as properly define the terminologies (i.e. mind, awareness, brains), or add a chapter on the latest and greatest scientific/philosophical advances to keep readers wanting to find out more about the brain/conciousness after this book.

Overall, fine book to keep if you are interested in neuroscience and psychology.
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