Making History und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
Derzeit nicht verfügbar.
Ob und wann dieser Artikel wieder vorrätig sein wird, ist unbekannt.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen

Making History (Englisch) Hörkassette – Audiobook, 1. November 1997


Alle 13 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Hörkassette, Audiobook
"Bitte wiederholen"
 
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Hörkassette
  • Verlag: Random House Audiobooks (1. November 1997)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 185686569X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1856865692
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (49 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 3.441.004 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"His best novel yet... an extravagant, deeply questioning work of science fiction."
— GQ

"A sci-fi comedy that is also a time-travel thriller, constantly topical and always surprising... packed with the author's personal enthusiasm and hatreds, the former red-hot and the latter icy-black."
— Literary Review
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Werbetext

A novel of ideas - comical, historical, frightening and unputdownable. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?

Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 16. November 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Dieses Buch ist wirklich ein Buch. Wenn man angefangen hat muss einem schon etwas sehr wichtiges dazwischenkommen (das Haus brennt, die Katze klemmt im Fenster oder das Bad steht unter Wasser), damit man es wieder aus der Hand legt. Frys Umgang mit Geschichte ist fantastisch. Er schreibt ohne einem ständig vor Augen zu halten wie wichtig es ist, sich betroffen zu fühlen und einem einzureden wieviel Verantwortung man selbst noch zu tragen hat. Andererseits ist er auch nicht verharmlosend oder respektlos. Fry hat meiner Meinung nach den perfekten Mittelweg gefunden, wie man 50 Jahre nach dem Holocaust auch darüber schreiben kann. Und er schreibt nunmal mit diesem unvergleichlichen Witz, der einen sogar in der U-Bahn oder im Hörsaal laut loslachen lässt. Dieser Roman ist allen zu empfehlen. Denen die sich nicht für Geschichte interessieren und ganz besonders denen, die sich dafür interessieren.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Mr Pocket am 18. November 2005
Format: Taschenbuch
What a book. All the usual Oscar Wilde flippancy, Evelyn Waugh waspishness and P.G. Wodehouse absurdity, cleverly guided by the pen of one of the world's sharpest wits plus, in this case, maybe just a touch of H.G. Wells thrown in for good measure.
The nub of the plot is that two Cambridge academics decide to reverse history and have Hitler 'unborn'. Simple enough, really! Unfortunately, of course, they don't foresee that the void left by a non-Hitler would have to be filled. Nature abhorrs a vacuum. Someone HAD to rise to power, in this case someone even worse - the timing and the circumstances in Europe pretty well guaranteed it.
History is changed, but the world doesn't turn out how they intended. Michael struggles in this new, disturbing world to find the physicist and to right the wrong, and along the way he finds love with another man. But will this love survive when they try to set the world right?
Sometimes fun, always intelligent, this novel can be called a sci-fi comedy, or just a highly imaginative book. It is rare to find a read that is this lighthearted and fun, yet profound enough to bring me to tears. Which is better, pain or oblivion? This book is clever on so many levels. But I still can't help but wonder what the world would have been like if Queen Victoria, rather than Hitler, was the one erased from our History.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ann W. Unemori am 24. April 1998
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Making History is one of those books that takes a fascinating idea--What Hitler had not been born?--and wanders around wondering just what to do with it. Certainly the inital premise is compling, graduate student Mark Young and his *Jewish* teacher Zuckerman send sterilization tablets back to the water in Hitlers hometown, thus preventing his parents from conceiving him. With this act, the world changes--yet not all that much. Fry upsets the Great Man Idea of history by giving Hitler an understudy--another despot, Rudi Glober, who not only becomes a more effective Fuhrer but also embraces the *Jewish science* of physics Hitler rejected. The resulting Reich now dominates all Europe with its nuclear warheads--yet how is it different from a world in which Hitler won? The concept has been done elsewhere--most notably Fatherland--with stronger results. Fry is considering removing the most provocative man of the 20th century, yet he only replaces a wolf with a tiger. The time-travel concept, first pills, then a dead rat, are shot backward a hundred years, is mentioned, then dropped. The homosexual angle is almost silly: In the alternate world Mark Young finally meets his One True Love,--Stephen, a fellow student. This idea is not new, in other hands Stephen would simply be Stephanie. While it is good to see homo-love mentioned without the mandatory agonizing, in this case it almost distracts from the initial idea of Hitler. True, gays died in the death camps, but Gay Guy Steve is no different from a Jewish girl in this setting. Mark, his lover, and Dr.Zuckerman shift from world to world with little real upheaval; the alternate world is grim, yet I have seen far worse ones, and far better. While Fry pens an enjoyable read, he plays with marvelous ideas he then abandons in favor of his own playful agenda. A dog sled goes faster if one dog is allowed to lead, not let each one get a sniff along the way.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Don W. am 18. Januar 1998
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Stephen Fry is mad as hell and he's not going to take it any more. Or is this book a satire? It's hard to tell. Anyway, he seems to have it in for sophomoric graduate students such as the putative hero Michael Young, the student's girlfriend, flunkies of various sorts, pompous professors, unaccountably gullible FBI agents, German militarists, and the village of Brunau-am-Inn, Adolf Hitler's birthplace. The main characters are so strange, to say the least, that Hitler himself tends to get lost in the shuffle.
The action oscillates between tragedy and slapstick comedy. Young, a schlemiel, accidentally spills some male sterilization pills that his chemist girlfriend happens to have left lying around in her laboratory. He steals them and, with the help of a friend's handy time machine, engages in a little trans-temporal terrorism, poisoning the water supply of Brunau 10 months before Hitler was to be conceived. I suppose we should be glad he doesn't rifle his girlfriend's desk drawers; he might discover even worse weapons of mass destruction, like a cache of atomic hand grenades.
Logically, "Making History" makes no sense. Young is catapulted into an alternate timeline where Hitler never existed. Orthodox time-travel theory prescribes that he stay home and somehow communicate with his new alter ego, but ours not to reason why. The Hitlerless timeline turns out to be even worse than our own: Rudolf Glober, just as diabolical as Hitler and twice as smart, founds the Nazi party and conquers Europe by playing all his cards impossibly right.
And that's the book's fatal flaw: Glober is a fictional character, and his success in outdoing Hitler is unbelievable.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen