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Louis Faurer (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 7. Januar 2002


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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 208 Seiten
  • Verlag: Merrell Publishers; Auflage: 1st Edition (7. Januar 2002)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1858941652
  • ISBN-13: 978-1858941653
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 28,6 x 30,6 x 2,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 614.426 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Synopsis

Louis Faurer was known for his raw, melancholy and psychologically charged pictures of life on the streets. This book is the first to examine Faurer's work in depth, bringing together a great deal of previously unpublished material, as well as images not seen since they originally appeared in magazines in the 1940s and 1950s.

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Von Robin Benson am 31. Januar 2011
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I find it odd that since the publication of this perfect photo book in 2002 there has not been another on Faurer's photography. Maybe this will be his publishing legacy. By all accounts his work seems to remain on the visual fringe of American photographers during that very creative period from the mid-thirties to the early sixties.

The bulk of the photos are Faurer's remarkable night shots of the streets of New York, especially Broadway and the Times Square area and as another reviewer has commented virtually everyone in these photos is looking elsewhere and apart despite being surrounded by of plenty people. Page eighty shows a woman having a flower pinned to her coat lapel but she is not looking at this but away from the person doing it, on the opposite page a women is adjusting her husband's hair while he looks away from her. Faurer seems to seek out individuals in a sea of crowds. The forty-nine page illustrated essay by Anne Tucker explores this theme.

After these photos in the book there are twenty-six taken between 1948 and 1983. They include three fashion shots in colour, experimental work in black and white and colour, four in NYC in the seventies (but I thought without the vigour of Faurer's earlier city work) and three taken in Paris. Missing are examples of his fashion work, perhaps two or three pages with large thumbnails of magazine spreads would have done. Interestingly there are three pages at the back of the book with a listing of all of Faurer's magazine work. Oddly there is a colour photo (page 163) of a family in Times Square, from 1950, that is printed the wrong way round.

The book's production is perfect. The one to a page photos are printed as 200 screen duotones on a good matt art, and thankfully the captions are printed on the same page as the photos. Overall I thought this was a beautiful looking monograph of Louis Faurer's photography.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 Rezensionen
20 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A MEMORABLE KEEPSAKE VOLUME 4. April 2002
Von Gail Cooke - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Famed photographer Louis Faurer, who died last year at the age of 84, is remembered for his inimitable fashion photos and arresting street scenes. With camera at the ready he traversed New York City streets, searching for the moments he wished to preserve.
The child of a blue-collar Philadelphia neighborhood, Faurer taught himself photography. As a young man he went to New York City, where he became friends with and influenced Robert Frank. For almost two decades he devoted himself to work for top fashion mags, such as Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Hollywood beckoned, and he served for a time as set photographer.
Faurer's skill as a portrait artist is manifestly apparent in his study of Walter Winchell, and Andy Warhol star Viva. Nonetheless, the New York street scenes are his most lasting legacy.
An award-winning writer and lecturer, Anne Wilkes Tucker has assembled a memorable keepsake volume for those who appreciate the art of photography.

- Gail Cooke
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Seeing Through the Eyes of God's Lonely Man 12. Dezember 2002
Von Interplanetary Funksmanship - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Recently, I visited the Art Institute of Chicago to catch a two-room show by Robert Frank, which feautures classic images from his seminal work "The Americans," along with more recent fare from the 1970s through the 1990s. Also on the bill was the main showing -- a retrospective of prints by the recently deceased Louis Faurer, of whom I had only passing knowledge -- which was sponsored by Robert Frank's foundation named in honour of his daughter, Andrea. Fortunately for me, I bit the hook baited with the Frank photographs (which were beautiful to see in person for the first time) and finally got acquainted with Faurer's work.
Lou Faurer was a fashion photographer from the late 1940s through the early 1970s for such magazines as Harper's Bazaar and Vogue, but his passion was photographing Times Square in Manhattan at night. What immediately struck me about his photographs was how Faurer took the blaring and glaring crossroads in the city that never sleeps, and extracted from them utter solitude and psychic desolation. An aging woman shields herself with an umbrella from the blinding fury of incandescent lights flickering, despite the dry pavements; A family up from the farmland poses for a portrait which places their quiet dignity in the foreground against the marquees of movie theatres; a man stands along the kerb both awestruck and intimidated, in a shot which must have later been the genesis of Robert deNiro's defining role of Travis Bickle, the loner cabbie who pads up and down Broadway in total anonymity.
There is plenty of fare available to the keen eye of the viewer who wants something off the beaten path, that's yet set on one of the most beaten paths in the world's travelogues.
Faurer was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and grew up in Philadelphia. It was here that he began his explorations as an amateur street photographer. During World War II, he took a photographic course from the Army, and was a civilian photographer for the War Department. After the Allied victory ended the war, Faurer began working in the fashion industry. It was around this time that his friendship with newly arrived Swiss-Jewish emigre Robert Frank began, as both worked as fashion photogs, while Faurer spent much of his time sweating away in Frank's darkroom. In the 1950s, their career paths diverged, with Frank following in the steps of Walker Evans as a straight documentarian, leaving Faurer to the fashion set. Yet, the two remained friends, despite Faurer's angry demeanour. One friend described friendship with Faurer as "high maintenance."
Faurer was exacting in capturing the exact tonal range and precise contrast needed to convey the feel of New York at night. Most of his early work is printed by himself, and while technically beautiful, it is refreshing to see that Faurer was not a perfectionist -- on many of his prints he left scratches, eyelash hairs and dust spots from negatives unretouched, whereas most other exhibiting photographers would have sweated bullets in spot-toning them out of existence. Strangely, it works, giving the viewer the "you are there" feeling of being present at the creation.
Also introduced for the first time are many of Faurer's Kodachrome reversal transparencies from the same time period (taken with his Leica rangefinder, very patiently handheld at night to render acceptably sharp images at 40 ASA). The resultant C-type prints made from internegatives are very faithful to Kodachrome's trademark warm tonality, and give us an alternative take on 1940s/50s Times Square.
Despite his photography being selected by Edward Steichen for the "Family of Man" compendium, Faurer remained on the fringes of the gallery scene, never fully embraced by the art photography movement until the 1970s. In his own lifetime, Faurer exhibited mostly in group exhibitions, but had only about five solo shows. This current retrospective is a long overdue gathering of most of Faurer's important works, which was first held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, moved to San Diego, and is fittingly due at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in June 2003.
As for the printing of the book itself, it is first rate, and both the tones and the colours are extremely true to the originals. Tucker's introductory essay is an excellent biographical sketch of Faurer the man, and Lisa Hostetler categorises Faurer within the realm of "Film Noir" photographers of his time, though she doesn't give enough background on the New York tabloid crime photographers such as Weegee and Osmund Leviness who defined what would later become the genre.
Nonetheless, this book (and the exhibition from which it was drawn) finally establishes Faurer among the top tier of art photographers where he rightly belongs.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The loneliness of crowds 31. Januar 2011
Von Robin Benson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I find it odd that since the publication of this perfect photo book in 2002 there has not been another on Faurer's photography. Maybe this will be his publishing legacy. By all accounts his work seems to remain on the visual fringe of American photographers during that very creative period from the mid-thirties to the early sixties.

The bulk of the photos are Faurer's remarkable night shots of the streets of New York, especially Broadway and the Times Square area and as another reviewer has commented virtually everyone in these photos is looking elsewhere and apart despite being surrounded by of plenty people. Page eighty shows a woman having a flower pinned to her coat lapel but she is not looking at this but away from the person doing it, on the opposite page a women is adjusting her husband's hair while he looks away from her. Faurer seems to seek out individuals in a sea of crowds. The forty-nine page illustrated essay by Anne Tucker explores this theme.

After these photos in the book there are twenty-six taken between 1948 and 1983. They include three fashion shots in color, experimental work in black and white and color, four in NYC in the seventies (but, I thought, without the vigor of Faurer's earlier city work) and three taken in Paris. Missing are examples of his fashion work, perhaps two or three pages with large thumbnails of magazine spreads would have done. Interestingly there are three pages at the back of the book with a comprehensive listing of all of Faurer's magazine work. Oddly there is a color photo (page 163) of a family in Times Square, from 1950, that is printed the wrong way round.

The book's production is perfect. The one to a page photos are printed as 200 screen duotones on a good matt art, and thankfully the captions are printed on the same page as the photos. Overall I thought this was a beautiful looking monograph of Louis Faurer's photography.

***LOOK INSIDE THE BOOK by clicking 'customer images' under the cover.
Stunning! 10. Februar 2011
Von micky marinelli - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Simply stunning! Some shots are rather "odd" and yet so beautiful. Faurer seemed to know how to see beauty and art in every street corner. The photos are a collection of NYC scenes, from the workers or the players to the passerby, from the glamorous to the sad, from the elegant to the poor, then busy street corners or the desolate and squalid ones... I only wish he were better-known!
A forgotten photographer 18. Mai 2014
Von Marco Paoluzzo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Robert Frank became famous overnight. Unfortunately his friend Louis Faurer, vanished from the public memory. It is not fair and this book repares a little bit the offense made to of one of the greatest photographers from the sixties. A lot of incredible pictures with a very sensitive approach. If you don't know him, buy this book and repair an injustice.
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