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Lost Tomb: The Most Extraordinary Archaeological Discovery of Our Time - The Burial Site of the Sons of Rameses II [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Kent Weeks
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Produktbeschreibungen

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Working for the American university in Cairo in 1988, Kent Weeks embarked on an archeological dig into KV5, the sparsely explored fifth tomb in the Valley of the Kings, burial ground of Egypt's major Pharaohs. In 1995, he discovered the T-shaped burial complex of Ramses II's 50 sons--arguably the most significant discovery since Howard Carter unearthed King Tut's tomb in 1922. Weeks's account of this historic event is filled with a sense of awe and wonder. "[I]n my imagination," he writes, recalling a vision of the statue of Osiris, god of the afterlife, "I could see the ancient funerals that took place three thousand years ago. I could hear ancient priests chanting prayers and shaking tambourines ... I could smell incense and feel priestly robes brush my arm as the funeral procession moved slowly past. For an instant I felt transported back in time: it was 1275 BCE and this was ancient Thebes."

Weeks also points out what his discovery may tell us about the powerful, redhaired pharoah who ruled ancient Egypt for 67 years (1279-1212 BC), including the possibility that he was the pharaoh of Exodus. He elaborates upon his profession's risks, from excavations in narrow, debris-filled and claustraphobic surroundings to working under the gunfire of terrorist attacks. And he reminds us that his discovery by no means brings Egyptology to a conclusion: "Every generation of Egyptologists asks different questions of its data and data are a finite resource. We will leave parts of KV5 undug so that archeologists of the future, armed with new questions and new excavation techniques, can seek new answers to old questions and to others we haven't even dreamed of." --Eugene Holley Jr. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Synopsis

Tomb 5 - the tomb surrounding that of Tutankhamen - had been looted, explored and discounted decades ago. So convinced were the authorities that nothing more was to be found in this area that plans were going ahead to build a carpark. In one final exploration of what had become a dumping ground for previous excavator's debris, Dr Kent Weeks, an American archaeologist, discovered a multiple corridored tomb of 62 chambers. They had stumbled upon a crypt fit for 50 princes - the sons of Rameses II - which had remained undisturbed for 2,000 years. It is known now as KV 5 - the greatest archaeological discovery for 75 years and the biggest and most complex tomb ever found in Egypt. Kent Weeks has written the book himself using his daily journals. The journal method heightens the drama; the author had no idea that he was on the verge of such a major find.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Dr. Kent Weeks is an Egyptologist with the American University inCairo. He received a Ph.D. from Yale in 1970, and is the co-author ofX-Raying the Pharaohs. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.
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