In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von Lost Memory of Skin auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen Oder fangen Sie mit einer unserer gratis Kindle Lese-Apps sofort an zu lesen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Jeder kann Kindle eBooks lesen - auch ohne Kindle-Gerät - mit der gratis Kindle Lese-App für Smartphones und Tablets.
Lost Memory of Skin
 
 

Lost Memory of Skin [Kindle Edition]

Russell Banks
4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 5,69 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 5,69  
Gebundene Ausgabe --  
Taschenbuch EUR 8,70  

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Destined to be a canonical novel of its time... it delivers another of Banks’s wrenching, panoramic visions of American moral life, and this one very particular to the early 21st century... Banks, whose great works resonate with such heart and soul, brings his full narrative powers to bear.” (Janet Maslin, New York Times)

“Banks may be the most compassionate fiction writer working today… Lost Memory of Skin is proof that Banks remains our premier chronicler of the doomed and forgotten American Male.” (New York Times Book Review)

“Banks’s enormous gamble in both plot and character pays off handsomely…By the end, Kafka is rubbing elbows with Robert Ludlum, and Banks has mounted a thrilling defense of the novel’s place in contemporary culture.” (The New Yorker)

“One of our finest novelists gives voice to the unspeakable…[A] compelling story” (O, the Oprah Magazine)

“His boldest imaginative leap yet into the invisible margins of society… Lost Memory of Skin is a haunting book.” (Wall Street Journal)

“Among contemporary writers giving voice to America’s beleaguered working class, Russell Banks may have no peer…this oddly unsettling, beautifully crafted novel…raise[s] fascinating issues.” (San Francisco Chronicle)

“Banks reveals the two [characters] with tenderness and trenchant wit, in a story that, not surprisingly, plumbs the depth of human despair and resilience. If that prowess is predictable, Skin is bound to leave you shaken and strangely reassured.” (USA Today)

“Mr. Banks knows plot, and incorporates intriguing complications to keep the novel building power all the way to the end.” (Pittsburg Post-Gazette)

“Russell Banks really does know how to pull his readers into a dark, dark world only to deliver us into the light.” (Boston Globe)

“Banks is in top form in his seventeenth work of fiction, a cyclonic novel of arresting observations, muscular beauty, and disquieting concerns… a commanding, intrepidly inquisitive, magnificently compassionate, and darkly funny novel of private and societal illusions, maladies, and truths.” (Booklist (starred review))

“Like our living literary giants Toni Morrison and Thomas Pynchon, Russell Banks is a great writer wrestling with the hidden secrets and explosive realities of this country.” (Cornel West)

“Russell Banks’s work presents without falsehood and with tough affection the uncompromising moral voice of our time... I trust his portraits of America more than any other—the burden of it, the need for it, the hell of it.” (Michael Ondaatje)

“Lost Memory of Skin should be required reading for anyone interested in fixing the country’s broken criminal justice system…Banks, in his latest novel, takes an unflinching look at people at their worst and manages to turn it into art.” (Associated Press)

“[It] is a pleasure to see [Banks’] gift turned to big, semisurreal characters. The grand, rambling examination of guilt and blame takes place against a ravishingly bleak backdrop, lyrically described, while each revelation of character is like a quiet explosion.” (Time Out New York)

“A ompelling story... one of those rare, strange, category-defying fictions that grabs hold of you... It’s hard to shake it off. And even when you do, it leaves a mark.” (Chicago Tribune)

“Banks is a master of peeling back the veneer to show us for the desperate creatures we are, no more so than in his fearless Lost Memory of Skin…[Banks] writes here with a combination of compassion and outrage… a compelling read and an indictment of our age.” (Miami Herald)

Pressestimmen

“Destined to be a canonical novel of its time... it delivers another of Banks’s wrenching, panoramic visions of American moral life, and this one very particular to the early 21st century... Banks, whose great works resonate with such heart and soul, brings his full narrative powers to bear.” (Janet Maslin, New York Times )

“Banks may be the most compassionate fiction writer working today… Lost Memory of Skin is proof that Banks remains our premier chronicler of the doomed and forgotten American Male.” (New York Times Book Review )

“Banks’s enormous gamble in both plot and character pays off handsomely…By the end, Kafka is rubbing elbows with Robert Ludlum, and Banks has mounted a thrilling defense of the novel’s place in contemporary culture.” (The New Yorker )

“One of our finest novelists gives voice to the unspeakable…[A] compelling story” (O, the Oprah Magazine )

“His boldest imaginative leap yet into the invisible margins of society… Lost Memory of Skin is a haunting book.” (Wall Street Journal )

“Among contemporary writers giving voice to America’s beleaguered working class, Russell Banks may have no peer…this oddly unsettling, beautifully crafted novel…raise[s] fascinating issues.” (San Francisco Chronicle )

“Banks reveals the two [characters] with tenderness and trenchant wit, in a story that, not surprisingly, plumbs the depth of human despair and resilience. If that prowess is predictable, Skin is bound to leave you shaken and strangely reassured.” (USA Today )

“Mr. Banks knows plot, and incorporates intriguing complications to keep the novel building power all the way to the end.” (Pittsburg Post-Gazette )

“Russell Banks really does know how to pull his readers into a dark, dark world only to deliver us into the light.” (Boston Globe )

“Banks is in top form in his seventeenth work of fiction, a cyclonic novel of arresting observations, muscular beauty, and disquieting concerns… a commanding, intrepidly inquisitive, magnificently compassionate, and darkly funny novel of private and societal illusions, maladies, and truths.” (Booklist (starred review) )

“Like our living literary giants Toni Morrison and Thomas Pynchon, Russell Banks is a great writer wrestling with the hidden secrets and explosive realities of this country.” (Cornel West )

“Russell Banks’s work presents without falsehood and with tough affection the uncompromising moral voice of our time... I trust his portraits of America more than any other—the burden of it, the need for it, the hell of it.” (Michael Ondaatje )

“Lost Memory of Skin should be required reading for anyone interested in fixing the country’s broken criminal justice system…Banks, in his latest novel, takes an unflinching look at people at their worst and manages to turn it into art.” (Associated Press )

“[It] is a pleasure to see [Banks’] gift turned to big, semisurreal characters. The grand, rambling examination of guilt and blame takes place against a ravishingly bleak backdrop, lyrically described, while each revelation of character is like a quiet explosion.” (Time Out New York )

“A ompelling story... one of those rare, strange, category-defying fictions that grabs hold of you... It’s hard to shake it off. And even when you do, it leaves a mark.” (Chicago Tribune )

“Banks is a master of peeling back the veneer to show us for the desperate creatures we are, no more so than in his fearless Lost Memory of Skin…[Banks] writes here with a combination of compassion and outrage… a compelling read and an indictment of our age.” (Miami Herald )

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 3053 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 433 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 184668577X
  • Verlag: Clerkenwell Press (29. September 2011)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0068R9PUA
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #206.664 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
4.0 von 5 Sternen
4.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A page turner 3. November 2011
Von Calixthe
Format:Taschenbuch
I am fascinated by stories that has characters with dark sides, but the types we don't know if we should pity or condemn. Russell did a great job on that with his central character. Reminds me of troubled character of Gavin in Triple Agent Double Cross. How do we judge the weirdos as victims of circumstances or the real perpetrators that their acts depict them to be? This is a brilliantly written book with a classy plot,amazing characterization and narration that makes it he page-turner it is.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3.0 von 5 Sternen experience 11. März 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
Rien de spéciale. Shows how justice can be wrong without being aware of it. Worth Reading iT, though sometimes to long in details.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 von 5 Sternen  122 Rezensionen
128 von 133 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Canary in a coal mine 1. Oktober 2011
Von Karen Franklin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The Kid is all alone in the world, hiding in the shadows under the freeway, part of an ever-growing mass of exiles electronically shackled to a society that despises and shuns them.

But who are these modern-day lepers? And why are there so many of them? What if sex offending is a symptom of a malfunctioning society, and these men are just the canaries in the coal mine, carrying the burden of society's shame? What if the Internet is the snake in the Garden of Eden, and pornography is the forbidden fruit?

In "Lost Memory of Skin," best-selling novelist Russell Banks explores the deeper ironies of a culture that condemns pedophiles even while turning its children into dehumanized sexual commodities. But on a deeper level, the novel is about the profound loneliness and alienation of the digital age, the inability of people to get beyond false facades to truly trust and connect with each other.

To the Kid, no one is real. They are all two-dimensional characters. The Professor, a sociologist who takes a mysterious interest in him. The other trolls under the bridge, who regard each other with wary suspicion. Even his own inadequate mother, who abandoned him when he was arrested trying to hook up with a 14-year-old girl he met in a chat room after years of solitary Internet stimulation.

In interviews, Banks has said that the idea for the book came in part from the encampment of registered sex offenders living under the Tuttle Causeway near his home in Florida. Serving as a jury foreman in a child molestation trial also piqued his interest.

"The guy was clearly guilty," he told a reporter. "But he was basically a confused, stupid alcoholic, and it was so easy to imagine this poor stumblebum, in a cloud most of the time, in a world that has been eroticized to such a degree, sitting there and he's sexually inadequate with his wife, and he's a loser, he's out of work, he has no sense of any power in the world whatsoever, so this beast in him starts to arise."

Although the novel is at moments a bit preachy, I found the enigmatic Kid growing on me as he gradually awakens from the fog of fantasy to claim his identity as a decent human being, albeit one with very few choices in life.
160 von 170 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Beyond tolerance 27. September 2011
Von "switterbug" Betsey Van Horn - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The main character of Banks' new novel, a twenty-two-year-old registered sex offender in South Florida known only as "the Kid," may initially repel readers. The Kid is recently out of jail starting a ten-year probation in fictional Calusa County, and is required to wear a GPS after soliciting sex from an underage female.

The Kid cannot leave the county, but he also cannot reside within 2,500 feet from any place children would congregate. That leaves three options--the swamplands, the airport area, or the Causeway. He chooses the Causeway and meets other sex offenders, a seriously motley crew, who consciously isolate from each other. He befriends one old man, the Rabbit, but sticks to his tent, his bicycle, and his alligator-size pet iguana, Iggy. Later, he procures a Bible.

These disenfranchised convicts are enough to make readers squirm. Moreover, in the back of the reader's mind is the question of whether authorial intrusion will be employed in an attempt to manipulate the reader into sympathizing with these outcasts. It takes a master storyteller, one who can circumnavigate the ick factor, or, rather, subsume it into a morally complex and irresistible reading experience, to lure the wary, veteran reader.

Banks' artful narrative eases us in slowly and deftly breaks down resistance, piercing the wall of repugnance. It infiltrates bias, reinforced by social bias, and allows you to eclipse antipathy and enter the sphere of the damned. A willing reader ultimately discovers a captivating story, and reaches a crest of understanding for one young man without needing to accept him.

A series of very unfortunate events occur, and the Kid becomes a migrant, shuffling within the legal radius of permitted locales. At about this time, he meets the Professor, who the Kid calls "Haystack," an obese sociologist at the local university, an enigmatic man with a past of shady government work and espionage. He is conducting a study of homelessness and particularly the homeless, convicted sex offender population.

The Professor offers the Kid financial and practical assistance in exchange for a series of taped interviews. He aims to help the Kid gain control and understanding over his life, to empower him to move beyond his depravities. They form a partnership of sorts, but the Kid remains leery of the Professor and his agenda. The Professor's opaque past, his admitted secrets and lies, marks him as an unreliable narrator. Or does it?

Sex offenders are the criminal group most collectivized into one category of "monsters." Banks takes a monster and probes below the surface of reflexive response. There is no attempt to defend the Kid's crime or apologize for it. We see a lot of the events through his eyes, and decide whether he is reliable or not.

The book is divided into five parts. Along the way, Banks dips into rhetorical digressions on sex, geography, and human nature, slowing down the momentum and disengaging the tension. These intervals are formal and stiff, although they are eventually braided into the story at large. However, despite these static flourishes, the story progresses with confidence and strength.

Overall, the languid pace of the novel requires steadfast patience, but commitment to it has a fine payoff. Readers are rewarded with a thrilling denouement and a pensive but provocative ending. It inspires contemplation and dynamic discussion, and makes you think utterly outside the box.
21 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen LOST MEMORY OF SKIN presents perhaps the most challenging work of Banks's career 2. November 2011
Von Bookreporter - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Russell Banks has long been considered one of the finest writers of literary fiction in America today. His portrait of the American landscape's dark side and the tortured souls who inhabit it have leapt from the small page to the big screen in award-winning films such as Affliction and The Sweet Hereafter. LOST MEMORY OF SKIN presents perhaps the most challenging work of Banks's career. With controversial and dark subject matter that is expertly handled, he creates a novel that will linger in the memory of its readers long after the final page is turned.

The main characters are not as much "people" as they are symbols and metaphors. With the exception of a few tertiary characters, the central figures here have no names. The protagonist, a convicted sex offender, is known simply as the Kid. In his early 20s, his life is already all but over. Convicted of soliciting sex with a minor, he has done his time in prison and is now forced to live under a causeway in Miami that is inhabited by fellow ex-cons and social miscreants. They represent the sad underbelly of society from which most people avert their eyes; they are the invisible minority.

The Kid is unable to get worthwhile employment, he cannot live within 2,500 feet of where children may gather, and he must wear an electronic device on his ankle for a decade, preventing him from wandering beyond the county limits. Whether the Kid was actually guilty of the crime for which he was incarcerated or set up in a string of potential sex offenders becomes almost irrelevant. The Kid, like most people, has made many mistakes in his life that he wishes he could change. His dark and somewhat perverted impulses have dominated his decision-making process and put him into a situation that seems hopeless.

Then, out of the blue, a local college professor approaches the causeway camp of mostly ex-sex offenders and offers them a deal. He is a sociologist of questionable moral character and full of secrets himself --- but to desperate people like the Kid, he is seen as a potential way out of a life that is virtually non-existent. The Professor offers the Kid and his comrades an opportunity to change their lives by controlling their impulses. In return, the Professor will gain valuable research on homelessness and recidivism among convicted sex offenders.

The Kid and the Professor form a strange bond --- one that is strengthened after the Professor comes to the Kid's financial aid when a police raid all but destroys every possession he had under the causeway. As they begin to build trust, the Professor slowly lets on about his own past --- one that is full of secrets. The Kid is not sure if he can believe the story the Professor has spun about a man who is under surveillance by certain government agencies that wish to silence him. He makes an odd request of the Kid when he asks him not to believe that suicide is the reason behind his death. The Kid reluctantly agrees.

Meanwhile, the Kid aligns himself with the Writer --- a journalist looking to uncover the truth behind the Professor's past. It is during this journey into the Professor's life that the Kid will smack first-hand into a parallel narrative that recalls his own past and questionable moral choices --- and he begins to fear that their fates may be destined to have the same ends.

LOST MEMORY OF SKIN is challenging and profane to the point of pornographic. Yet it is so unflinchingly real that you cannot help but turn the pages as Banks digs deeper and deeper into the psyches that shape the shadowed edges of American culture.

Reviewed by Ray Palen
36 von 43 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen A missed opportunity 6. November 2011
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
Someone needs to write a good book about the need to revisit sex offender laws. Privately, everyone who knows about how our legal system treats sexual offenders will admit there are major problems which need to be addressed. (No one in political life will admit it publicly, for obvious reasons.) This novel beautifully sets up a story that illustrates the problem well. Does a very young man, who is not terribly bright, and who has done a truly bad thing (although, in the case, with no actual victim) deserve the same fate as a serial pedophile offender? Banks sets up a great case, backed by a couple of interesting characters, and then disappoints with a loose, poorly organized plot and, for the most part, surprisingly uninspired writing. I found myself wondering if this is another example of book which, due to his successes and reputation of the author, doesn't get the kind of editing it needs.
16 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Brilliant Novel with a Very Troubled Central Character 1. Oktober 2011
Von C. E. Selby - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Von Amazon bestätigter Kauf
Let me begin with some biographical information: I live only blocks away from the Julia Tuttle Causeway that inspired this novel and once worked with juvenile male sex offenders. So naturally I had a keen interest in this novel when I heard Russell Banks interviewed on the NewsHour (PBS). For someone who knows the actual geography of this novel, I wish Mr. Banks had not fictionalized all the place names because I really don't see why he would have had to. This all takes place in and around Miami Beach, not Calusa! That is one of two negative criticism. Rampert Road? Oh, dear, not that for Lincoln Road? He doesn't even have Biscayne Bay!
The other relates to the hurricane which never existed as described. But more troubling is this: there is no way a person would drive for hundreds of miles in the eye of a hurricane. Hurricanes, on the whole, travel very slowly. Mr. Banks clearly didn't do his homework on this. In addition he calls it a category 3 but has winds under a 100 mph. That is not a category three.
"Lost Memory of Skin" is my second Banks novel, so I know his style of writing in "Contintental Drift" was not that of the dispassionate reporter, but in this new novel it works so well for this novel centered around the Kid, a twenty-two-year-old wearing an ankle monitoring device and "living" under the causeway with dozens of others who have been labeled sex offenders, all of them under a type of house arrest but without the house. So typical of this state which rightfully earns all the satire about its so-called governance!
This style works because the Kid has cut off all feelings for others, even for his pet ignuana, Iggy, the perfect metaphor for the novel since the Kid, like Iggy, is able to change colors metaphorically in order to survive. This sentence on page 72 is a perfect summary: "The Kid is good at keeping in cages the things that trouble his mind." But we are given full access. And it is a very troubling mind.
Chapter ten is truly brilliant--well, all of them are, but this one especially so. The Kid, for the first time, begins to read the Bible, starting with the story of Adam and Eve, a story that leads the Kid to analyze his own situation with his unmarried mother who... Well, I won't tell you that! But I will reveal this sentence: "The Kid wonders if it's possible that this whole tree of knowledge of good and evil thing was set up by God as a kind of prehistoric sex-sting with the Snake as the decoy." Wouldn't that make for a fascinating sermon topic for some right-wing fundamentalist preacher!
When you begin the novel, note Gloria carefully. The novel takes on a new life with the advent of the Professor. But I don't want to give anything away.
By the way--or maybe not so by the way--Russell Banks' sentences are just so wonderful and often lengthy but without commas. And it works! Comma, begone!
This is not a novel that will shock although it is a novel that digs deeply into many of the issues the sex offenders have as well as the aspects of society that make life difficult for them.
Highly recommended.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


ARRAY(0xa1333384)