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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"There have been several books about the lost boys of Sudan for adults, teens, and even for elementary-school readers. But [this] spare, immediate account, based on a true story, adds a stirring contemporary dimension. . . . Young readers will be stunned by the triumphant climax."  —Booklist, starred review

"[This] spare, hard-hitting novel delivers a memorable portrait of two children in Sudan. . . . Tragic and harrowing."— Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Two narratives intersect in a quiet conclusion that is filled with hope."—School Library Journal, starred review

"This powerful dual narrative packs suspense and introspection into Park's characteristic spare description; while there are lots of details offered to the reader, they come not in long, prosaic lines but in simple, detached observations. Both Salva's and Nya's stories are told with brutal, simple honesty, and they deliver remarkable perspective on the Sudanese conflict. The novel's brevity and factual basis makes the reality of life in Sudan very accessible, and readers will find both the story and the style extremely moving."—The Bulletin

"Park simply yet convincingly depicts the chaos of war and an unforgiving landscape. . . . A heartfelt account."—Kirkus Reviews

"Brilliant. . . . A touching narrative about strife and survival on a scale most American readers will never see."— Book Page

"Riveting."—The Horn Book

"[A] fast, page-turning read. . . . A great book for high school students and an important novel for young adults who enjoy learning about other world cultures."—VOYA



"There have been several books about the lost boys of Sudan for adults, teens, and even for elementary-school readers. But [this] spare, immediate account, based on a true story, adds a stirring contemporary dimension. . . . Young readers will be stunned by the triumphant climax."  —Booklist, starred review

"[This] spare, hard-hitting novel delivers a memorable portrait of two children in Sudan. . . . Tragic and harrowing."— Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Two narratives intersect in a quiet conclusion that is filled with hope."—School Library Journal, starred review

"This powerful dual narrative packs suspense and introspection into Park's characteristic spare description; while there are lots of details offered to the reader, they come not in long, prosaic lines but in simple, detached observations. Both Salva's and Nya's stories are told with brutal, simple honesty, and they deliver remarkable perspective on the Sudanese conflict. The novel's brevity and factual basis makes the reality of life in Sudan very accessible, and readers will find both the story and the style extremely moving."—The Bulletin

"Park simply yet convincingly depicts the chaos of war and an unforgiving landscape. . . . A heartfelt account."—Kirkus Reviews

"Brilliant. . . . A touching narrative about strife and survival on a scale most American readers will never see."— Book Page

"Riveting."—The Horn Book

"[A] fast, page-turning read. . . . A great book for high school students and an important novel for young adults who enjoy learning about other world cultures."—VOYA



"There have been several books about the lost boys of Sudan for adults, teens, and even for elementary-school readers. But [this] spare, immediate account, based on a true story, adds a stirring contemporary dimension. . . . Young readers will be stunned by the triumphant climax."  —Booklist, starred review

"[This] spare, hard-hitting novel delivers a memorable portrait of two children in Sudan. . . . Tragic and harrowing."— Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Two narratives intersect in a quiet conclusion that is filled with hope."—School Library Journal, starred review

"This powerful dual narrative packs suspense and introspection into Park's characteristic spare description; while there are lots of details offered to the reader, they come not in long, prosaic lines but in simple, detached observations. Both Salva's and Nya's stories are told with brutal, simple honesty, and they deliver remarkable perspective on the Sudanese conflict. The novel's brevity and factual basis makes the reality of life in Sudan very accessible, and readers will find both the story and the style extremely moving."—The Bulletin

"Park simply yet convincingly depicts the chaos of war and an unforgiving landscape. . . . A heartfelt account."—Kirkus Reviews

"Brilliant. . . . A touching narrative about strife and survival on a scale most American readers will never see."— Book Page

"Riveting."—The Horn Book

"[A] fast, page-turning read. . . . A great book for high school students and an important novel for young adults who enjoy learning about other world cultures."—VOYA



"There have been several books about the lost boys of Sudan for adults, teens, and even for elementary-school readers. But [this] spare, immediate account, based on a true story, adds a stirring contemporary dimension. . . . Young readers will be stunned by the triumphant climax."—Booklist, starred review

"[This] spare, hard-hitting novel delivers a memorable portrait of two children in Sudan. . . . Tragic and harrowing."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

"Two narratives intersect in a quiet conclusion that is filled with hope."—School Library Journal, starred review

"This powerful dual narrative packs suspense and introspection into Park's characteristic spare description; while there are lots of details offered to the reader, they come not in long, prosaic lines but in simple, detached observations. Both Salva's and Nya's stories are told with brutal, simple honesty, and they deliver remarkable perspective on the Sudanese conflict. The novel's brevity and factual basis makes the reality of life in Sudan very accessible, and readers will find both the story and the style extremely moving."—The Bulletin

"Park simply yet convincingly depicts the chaos of war and an unforgiving landscape. . . . A heartfelt account."—Kirkus Reviews

"Brilliant. . . . A touching narrative about strife and survival on a scale most American readers will never see."—BookPage

"Riveting."—The Horn Book

"[A] fast, page-turning read. . . . A great book for high school students and an important novel for young adults who enjoy learning about other world cultures."—VOYA

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Linda Sue Park is the author of Newbery Medal title A Single Shard as well as numerous other novels, picture books, and poetry. She lives in Rochester, NY, with her family, and has a friend who was one of Sudan's "lost boys." His story was the inspiration for this book.

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55 von 59 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An Amazing Journey 8. November 2010
Von Yoomi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
There have been many books written about The Lost Boys of Sudan for adults, but not much for the 10-12 age group so I was excited when I heard about "A Long Walk to Water". It's a complicated story to explain, with a war that never seems to end, and suffering that can be difficult to put in words. Linda Sue Park manages to do this by weaving a beautiful story between the past and the present.

To say that Salva walks a long way is an understatement. It's hard to imagine walking for days, let alone a year and a half to find refuge. And the hardships he endures along the way seem impossible to overcome. Yet he manages to keep going, one day at a time. It's an amazing story put in terms that I think younger readers can understand. It is a little confusing at first, with the story going between Salva and Nya, a girl in another village but as the story continued, it made sense to me that they should be told in parallel. Knowing how the two stories would come together made me even more anxious to finish the book.

Not only does Linda Sue Park tell a beautiful, inspiring story, she also brings awareness to the conflict in a far away country and the need for clean water, something we take for granted here in the States. The notes at the end from Salva Dut and the author should definitely be read and teachers/parents could open up some important discussions.

This is definitely a book that will go in the school library where I work.
86 von 96 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A riveting read... 13. November 2010
Von Lori Katz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
"A Long Walk to Water" by Linda Sue Park is based on a true story and what an incredible story it is. In 1985, Salva, an 11 year-old boy in Sudan fleas his home village when it is attacked and walks through desert and lion country, crosses a crocodile filled river and spends years in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya. Laced between Salva's travels is Nya's story set in Sudan in 2008. Just as riveting we see Nya walk each day for 8 hours to bring water back to her home. Both stories are haunting and beautiful and I could not put this book down. Both Salva and Nya are strong and resilient. It is amazing to me how much I can learn from a children's historical fiction book. Recommended for readers who enjoy historical fiction, adventure or just a great story.
111 von 132 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A long walk indeed for such a short book 19. November 2010
Von Julie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
I have mixed feelings about this book. The book follows a lost boy of Sudan and is based on a true story. There are many fine details about life in Sudan, starting with the young girl (Nye) who spends most of her waking hours walking back and forth to bring water to her family. What an essential topic for young adults (and adults) to read and learn about. As a teacher, I wanted to like the book, recommend the book, teach the book before I ever opened it. It's very short, a major plus for many reluctant readers, and the reading level is not challenging. But for such a short book, it feels long.

The chapters alternate between main characters Salva and Nye. Only at the end of the book is the connection between the two characters revealed, and it's the greatest pleasure of the book. Unfortunately, it doesn't rescue the book for me. For most of the book, the alternating chapters irritate because they are so disparate. Furthermore, the book covers some 20+ years of Salva's life in a span of 128 pages, most of which is spent walking. It's one of those books that we want children to love and some certainly will, but many will declare it boring. I couldn't help wondering if the book might be better told in flashback by Salva. With all that walking, Salva had plenty of time to think, yet there is no feeling in the thoughts. He misses his family. He worries the group will leave him behind. He wonders what will become of him. These are thoughts we need not be told--that much is obvious. I know this is Linda Sue Park's writing style, but it's not to my personal taste.

Based on what I know about the lost boys in Sudan, I braced myself to feel sick to my stomach while reading the book, but I never really did, except for one scene involving crocodiles (and soldiers). Park was responsibly sensitive about what to include regarding the violence and abusive soldiers. Between her sparse style and this sensitivity, however, the book and characters lack the emotional depth that should make Salva's story unforgettable, which it is. It's an important topic that young people should know about, but I'm holding out for a richer book on the topic.
29 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The cost of living... 20. Januar 2011
Von NyiNya - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
Hardship is in the eye of the beholder. Here at home, most of us are experiencing it to some extent. Whether it's just cutting back a little, or facing down the barrel of a mortgage payment you can't meet, life has become harder. Does it help to get some perspective?

Does it help to know that, right now, there are places where the cost of a bucket of water is measured in human life?

In the Sudan, water is more precious than gold. You can't eat gold, and without water, you can't eat. It's a dry country at best, but when droughts come, lasting months or years, crops fail, cattle die, and people starve. Water, when available, isn't always clean, so at the best of times, cholera and dysentery are are common. The simple act of getting that water is beyond imagining. It means walking miles to the nearest source, hoping that rival groups don't arrive at the same time so you won't have to fight or risk being killed to get your jug filled. It means filling that jug and carrying it back home, emptying it into a pail and setting out again. Over and over again, dusk until dawn. Venomous snakes and dangerous animals are so common, they barely rate notice. Children, being of less value than adults, are usually given the job. Since girls are not as valuable as boys, this is typically their task. In families of wealth, the boys attend school while the girls learn to become wives and homemakers...and water carriers.

In the dry season, or during a drought, things get trickier. Entire families spend their days trekking for water, and deadly battles over who got there first are much more frequent. At any time of year, drought or no drought, an added attraction would be run-ins with militia groups...armed thugs on either side of endless rebellions, who shoot first and consider political or religious allegiances second.

In 1985, Salva Dut was 11 years old. The Sudani boy was at school when his family fled from a militia attack, leaving him behind. He joined a ragged band of pilgrims heading to safety...the Ethiopian border. He and his group plodded through deserts where thirst and scorpions took out the weakest, over plains where lions and hyenas picked off stragglers one by one. They waded through swamps where crocodiles grew fat and bloated from the easy prey of men, women and children. Because he was young, Salva couldn't stand up for his share of whatever meager foods were found along the way, so he ate almost nothing on the pilgrimage.

It's hard to read about Salva's journey. It's hard to imagine, in our enlightened times, that this still happens, every day, to millions of people. Not dozens, not hundreds, but millions. Not an exception to life on our planet, but a timeless rule. Salva's story has a happy ending. After spending time in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya, he becomes one of a handful of children given the gift of life in the U.S.

As an adult, Salva helped to establish Water for Sudan, a foundation that builds wells and brings clean water to the villages in his home country.

The book also describes the life of Nya, a Sudanese girl. It takes place in 2003, and the chapters run concurrently. Nya is her family's water carrier and through her story we that we see what life was like in the typical Sudanese village and understand the backbreaking and never ending labor required to acquire a day's worth of water. We see people willing to kill others to get first shot at a waterhole that's drying up under a pitiless sun, parents who have no choice but to send their children in harm's way for the precious commodity. And we see what life is after the village gets its first well, we see how something so simple can have a life-changing impact on generations of people. It's still a land where life is hard and water is precious, but at least now, it isn't paid for, pint by pint, in human life and suffering.

Salva Dut is a real person, and Water for Sudan is a real organization. Nya is a compilation, based on all children like her.

Life is hard. But in someplaces, it's a lot harder. Sure, it doesn't help, when you're out of work and the unemployment is running out to think: Whoa, somewhere in sub-equatorial Africa, things are much, much worse. But at least when the wolf is still down the block and we're not looking in its glassy eyes, maybe we should be grateful for what we have, even in the worst of times. I hate to be preachy, but this book did help me get a little perspective. When the thought of my retirement being postponed until I'm up in the triple digits, of having to make do with my poor, battered Honda another couple of years, and putting the $12 martini on my endangered species list, I hope I can keep the self-pity down to a simmer.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Thought Provoking 25. Oktober 2011
Von virginiaplain - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
My son is reading this in middle school. I picked it up and read it in a couple of hours.

Knowing the intended audience for this book, I don't see how it could be improved upon. I did like the style of writing. Also, the author dispenses only small but poignant (& horrible) events of the characters' lives in a way that a young reader can contemplate and grow.

Personally, I am embarrassed that I did not know more about this region of the world, and would like to learn more about the Sudan people after reading this book.
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