EUR 12,98
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,15 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 2 Bilder anzeigen

London Under (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 2. Mai 2011


Alle 8 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Gebundene Ausgabe
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 12,98
EUR 11,34 EUR 5,98
11 neu ab EUR 11,34 6 gebraucht ab EUR 5,98

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

London Under + London: A Biography
Preis für beide: EUR 27,93

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"This book is not a straightforward history of London's relationship with the clay on which it stands but a poetic invoking of what Ackroyd perceives as the diabolic terror of the earth."
—Metro
 
"Other worlds lurk below London, and Ackroyd revels in them. The book is both an absorbing history of those parts of the capital that lie beneath our feet and a meditation on the meaning we give them."
—Adrian Tinniswood, Literary Review
 
"A literary, cultural and topographical sat-nav for going underground in London... With quick, deft stitches he sews the fantastical and the familiar into a macabre sampler of the city that exists beneath the feet of its citizens."
The Times

Werbetext

From the author of the bestselling London: The Biography, a poetic and powerful urban history of life and legend beneath London

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 45 Rezensionen
33 von 34 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Depths of History 18. November 2011
Von R. Hardy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
There is plenty to see in London, and the prolific Peter Ackroyd has written about the city itself, the river that runs through it, its Great Fire, and much more. In his most recent work, however, he takes us down to underground parts that we don't get to see (except for the famous Underground itself). _London Under: The Secret History Beneath the Streets_ (Nan A. Talese) is an appreciation of the wonderful and the appalling that supports or slithers within the foundation of the great city. There is throughout a dual emphasis here. We think of the ground beneath us as the realm of the devil, for instance, but also it is where there is buried treasure, if we only knew where to dig. It is the region of sewers, and also of sacred wells. Historian Ackroyd obviously loves the subterranean theme, though, because, as he repeatedly shows, each age is built on the one before, and so the levels of history are written within the soil. This is a beautiful little book, brightly organized into chapters, each of which has a vital story full of intriguing detail. Ackroyd writes with his usual enthusiastic flair, and entertains us with the chthonic demons and treasures.

Workmen in 1865 were digging beneath Oxford Street, and found a flight of steps. They descended, and found an arched brick structure, probably a Roman baptistery with the spring bubbling up in it still. Was it rescued and renovated and put on the long list of London's important sights for visitors? No, it was obliterated to make a foundation for a new building. The new constantly covers up the old. Plenty of springs and wells and streams have been buried. There still are streams, but they no longer run down the hills and meander through the fields. They have been redirected underground, conducted through pipes and tunnels and emptying into the Thames, just as they used to do without our help. The underground rivers and sewers were not uninhabited. Official workers had to go in from time to time to clear things out, and they risked getting into a region of no oxygen or being present when the gasses around them exploded. Unofficial workers were also present, the "toshers" who scavenged in the sewers for anything of value. After the horror of "The Great Stink" of 1858, London installed a sewer system that is still working today. You know of Christopher Wren's masterpieces aboveground, but Ackroyd cites Joseph Bazalgette as an engineer of genius who devised the comparable masterpiece of the sewers below. Of course the Tube gets its chapters. The first escalator was installed in 1911, and it was a sensation. Some people were frightened of the machines, but the management hired a man with a wooden leg to ride up and down to demonstrate that there was nothing to fear.

Ackroyd's style is solidly literary, with plenty of erudite references to classical and biblical legends of the underworld. He conveys with eagerness the gloom and danger but also the fascination and historical richness of the unseen depths. He takes in a large amount of history, gathered into chapter themes that are more-or-less chronological. It is not always a pretty or hygienic picture, but it is fascinating on every page.
17 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Disappointing 29. Dezember 2011
Von SMT - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
How can a book by Peter Ackroyd be disappointing? He is among the most erudite of contemporary historians. His works are the perfect balance of historical fact and engaging writing. He is a gifted writer of fiction and non-fiction. Any reader familiar with his work would expect 'London Under' to be another example of his considerable skill.

Instead, as other reviewers agree, this little book is a disappointment. Perhaps readers should be grateful that it is so short, because it is a clumsy collection of facts hastily flung together and coupled with vague gestures towards historical analysis. Here and there a few shining sentences show Ackroyd's brilliant touch. The rest of the book reads as if a junior researcher had arranged a series of notecards for the author to glance at in his spare time. Chronological hiccups and non sequiturs litter the pages. Glaring omissions will disturb readers with even the slightest interest in the subject; how is it possible, for example, for a study of underground London to make no mention of Churchill and the Cabinet War Rooms, other than in a caption for a photograph? Dull lists of dreary facts bore even the most avid reader; compare Chapter 12: The War Below with the Wikipedia page 'Air-raid shelter'.

Only die-hard Ackroyd fans need read this and prepare, my friends, to be disappointed.
37 von 44 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Interesting AND boring at the same time, and quite short 6. Dezember 2011
Von beachbrian - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
I learned about this book via an NPR radio interview with the author. It sounded fascinating, and Mr. Ackroyd sounded like he could elaborate well and tell a good story, in addition to listing facts about the historical and rare glimpse into the subterranean world under this great city.

Unfortunately, this book read like a long list of facts. Facts, facts, facts. Under this building is x. Beneath that grate is y. Etc, etc etc. A single paragraph could tell you about a dozen different underground "things," yet apart from rattling them off, one or two per sentence, there was usually very little or no context, interesting tidbits about the fact, or story to make it truly an interesting read. The content of this book could have been formatted as a very long bulleted list of all the underground places of interest and it would have been no less interesting. Where the author does once in a while depart into a story or anecdote, it's short, too infrequent, and fails to hold enough of my interest.

Not to mention, on my Kindle, the book abruptly ended with a short chapter about aliens forcing our future human generations into the sewers, at just 61% of the way through! (the remaining 39% was bibliography, glossary, etc.).

This is my first book review, and I read a lot, so this book obviously had enough of an impact on me to go out of my way to write this. I thought the price was a little steep but expected a very interesting read. Yes, some parts were interesting, and I learned a lot of FACTS, such that if I was to go to London and want to explore hidden places I probably couldn't get access to, I'd make a list from this book, but it wasn't fascinating, nor did I feel it was a good value.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Amazingly researched recitation of dry facts 28. Juni 2012
Von Timothy Masters - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
My mind is boggled by the immensity of the research that must have gone into creating this book. It is a collection of facts that is almost unbelievable in scope. For a person who is doing a scholarly study of the topic, this book will be an invaluable resource.

However, I was hoping for a little entertainment. Okay, I admit that I silently mouthed, "Wow!" two or three times. There are a couple of fascinating tidbits scattered here and there. However, here is a typical example of the writing:

"From Marylebone Lane the Tyburn follows a southward course across Oxford Street, where it then turns southeast into South Moulton Lane. Brook Street is named after it. It then pursues a circuitous course through Mayfair before finally emerging into Down Street where naturally enough it descends into Picadilly.... The Tyburn then crosses Green Park, flows past..."

You get the idea. Nearly the entire book reads like this, a dry, boring recitation of facts that few people would be interested in. This is too bad, because this book could have been made into a masterpiece with a little more imagination and a touch of drama.

Tim
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Disappointing book from a usually terrific author 6. Januar 2012
Von Barb - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I'm not often disappointed in a book that delves into archeology and old cities, but London Under proved the exception. Ackroyd skittles about with a mention of this and then on to a mention of that, and never develops any systematic look at any aspect of what lies beneath present day London. The old cartoons have charm, but I'd rather find out more about the process of discovery, and what was learned as further excavations (or bombs) exposed other parts. The paucity of pictures in material that cries out for them is also surprising.

It would be interesting to see what David Macaulay might have done with this same material. Or National Geographic. Or even a decent editor.

Ackroyd is clearly smart, but this seems to have been a book dashed out with a concept but no coherent approach. Tough to make such interesting material inaccessible, but that's just what he did.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.