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Produktinformation

  • Audio CD
  • Verlag: Naxos Rights; Auflage: Abridged (31. Mai 2005)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 9626343397
  • ISBN-13: 978-9626343395
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,2 x 14,7 x 2,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 164.227 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Synopsis

Suetonius wrote his Lives of the Twelve Caesars in the reign of Vespasian around 70AD. He chronicled the extraordinary careers of Julius, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero, Vespasian and Domitian and the rest in technicolour terms. They presented some high and low times at the heart of the Roman Empire. The accounts provide us with perspicacious insights into the men as much as their reigns - and it was from Suetonius that subsequent writers such as Robert Graves drew so much of his material.

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Travis Benson am 16. Februar 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
In historical study there are two types of literature. Secondary sources are written based on the original writings which are known as Primary sources. If you want to lern about the earliest Roman Emperors this source is indispensable. True, some of it is not historical and Suetonius is somewhat of a gossip monger at times, seeing as he explains in detail the various sexual appetites of each Caesar as well as other deviant behaviour. Still, this is one of the foremost primary sources about those famous Romans and most of the history books written on the Caesars are standing on Suetonius' shoulders.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Not much is known about the life of Gaius Suetonius Tranquillis. He was probably born in A.D. 69--the famous 'year of four Emperors'--when his father, a Roman knight, served as a colonel in a regular legion and took part in the Battle of Baetricum.
Suetonius became a scribe and noted secretary to the military set, eventually ending up in the service of Hadrian, who was emperor from A.D. 117-138. He was dismissed for 'indiscreet behaviour' with Hadrian's empress, Sabina, but not before doing sufficient research to complete many books of a historical nature. His attempts at philosophy were much less well received, and most of his history has been overlooked by all but classical scholars, but this work, 'The Twelve Caesars' has held the imagination of more than just the scholarly set since it was first written.
Suetonius had the good fortune of speaking to eyewitnesses from the time of the early Caesars. Much of his information about Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero in fact comes from those who observed and/or participated in their lives. Suetonius is in many ways more of a reporter than an historian--he would record conflicting statements without worrying about the reconciliation (this set him apart from Tacitus and other classical historians who tried to find a consistency in stories and facts.
Suetonius has been described as the tabloid journalist of ancient Rome, because not only did he not appear to check facts (which in fact is not true--he did check, he just didn't try to smooth over the conflicting facts), but he choose to concentrate on the private lives, motivations and personality quirks of his subjects rather than their grand plans, policies and military/political victories. Thus, many details of the lurid scene appear.
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Von Ein Kunde am 13. August 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is wonderful and MUST be read by anyone interested in Roman history. It's focused on emperors life, reported annedocts and facts.
Just beware: not all the facts are considered to be true.
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12 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
If ancient Rome had tabloids... 9. Dezember 2005
Von FrKurt Messick - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Not much is known about the life of Gaius Suetonius Tranquillis. He was probably born in A.D. 69--the famous 'year of four Emperors'--when his father, a Roman knight, served as a colonel in a regular legion and took part in the Battle of Baetricum.

Suetonius became a scribe and noted secretary to the military set, eventually ending up in the service of Hadrian, who was emperor from A.D. 117-138. He was dismissed for 'indiscreet behaviour' with Hadrian's empress, Sabina, but not before doing sufficient research to complete many books of a historical nature. His attempts at philosophy were much less well received, and most of his history has been overlooked by all but classical scholars, but this work, 'The Twelve Caesars' has held the imagination of more than just the scholarly set since it was first written.

Suetonius had the good fortune of speaking to eyewitnesses from the time of the early Caesars. Much of his information about Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero in fact comes from those who observed and/or participated in their lives. Suetonius is in many ways more of a reporter than an historian--he would record conflicting statements without worrying about the reconciliation (this set him apart from Tacitus and other classical historians who tried to find a consistency in stories and facts.

Suetonius has been described as the tabloid journalist of ancient Rome, because not only did he not appear to check facts (which in fact is not true--he did check, he just didn't try to smooth over the conflicting facts), but he choose to concentrate on the private lives, motivations and personality quirks of his subjects rather than their grand plans, policies and military/political victories. Thus, many details of the lurid scene appear. Suetonius, and this volume in particular, formed much of the basis for Robert Graves as he wrote 'I, Claudius' and 'Claudius the God', which in turn pulled up the popularity of Suetonius in this generation.

Suetonius had first hand knowledge of many of the Caesars who followed the Claudians, and ready access to the archives of the imperial family and the Senate, given his imperial posting.

This translation is not intended to be a faithful rendering of the language (which might well result in a stilted English construct) but rather a faithful account of the stories Suetonius tells. Graves has taken the liberty of changing monetary, date, and technical terms into standard English measurements of close kinship of meaning.

For the record, the twelve Caesars, about whom Suetonius writes, are:

+ Julius Caesar

+ Augustus

+ Tiberius

+ Gaius Caligula

+ Claudius

+ Nero

+ Galba

+ Otho

+ Vitellius

+ Vespasian

+ Titus

+ Domitian

Suetonius held nothing back in writing about the personal habits of the emperors and their families, nor did he hold back in his moral judgement of them. Of Tiberius, for instance, he wrote that Tiberius did so many other wicked deeds under the pretext of reforming public morals--but in reality to gratify his lust for seeing people suffer--that many satires were written against the evils of the day, incidentally expressing gloomy fears about the future.... At first Tiberius dismissed these verses as the work of bilious malcontents who were impatient with his reforms and did not really mean what they said. He would remark: 'Let them hate me, so long as they fear me!' But, as time went on, his conduct justified every line they had written.

Graves' edition of Suetonius is available under many covers, from hard-back study editions to Penguin paperbacks, including a wonderful, finely printed edition by the Folio Society. Take a step back into the seemier side of ancient Rome, the side most history courses overlook in favour of more traditional historical events, and hie thee to the bookstore for this work.
19 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Read your primary sources people! 16. Februar 2000
Von Travis Benson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
In historical study there are two types of literature. Secondary sources are written based on the original writings which are known as Primary sources. If you want to lern about the earliest Roman Emperors this source is indispensable. True, some of it is not historical and Suetonius is somewhat of a gossip monger at times, seeing as he explains in detail the various sexual appetites of each Caesar as well as other deviant behaviour. Still, this is one of the foremost primary sources about those famous Romans and most of the history books written on the Caesars are standing on Suetonius' shoulders.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Ethan Hamwi Ph. D. 18. Juli 2002
Von Ethan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a brilliantly translated form of Suetonius's "LIVES". Such clarity and definition, the complete essence of his writings are clearly communicated. An intruiging text emanating from intruiging Roman leaders.
A must read for any historian or student.

Ethan*
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
All the Dirty Laundry! 9. September 2005
Von Brian Bear - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Seutonius did the world a great service when he wrote his "The Lives of the Twelve Caesars". This was one of the first primary sources that I read, and it remains a favourite of mine.

Seutonius tackles each of the first twelve Caesars in chronological order, with a section on each one. He claims he has used many sources, and has even included some hearsay or otherwise unconfirmed information. He certainly was not shy about airing their dirty laundry.

Unlike a lot of ancient authors that get translated into English, Suetonius' style is very relaxed and very easy to get absorbed into. Even in translation, the book maintains a brisk pace and has enough to keep one interested until the last page.

Suetonius' "The Lives of the Twelve Caesars" is a fascinating book, written with access to sources long lost to us. This is a great book to read and enjoy, simultaneously being good for those interested in serious study of the period.
listen to the audio instead! it takes you there! 5. Oktober 2014
Von Halifax Student Account - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Don't read it, hear it!

Imagine a guy from the ancient world talking in your ear. Well what are you waiting for? You can download the audio of the 12 C's and I promise you; you won't be disappointed.

Reading isn't the same as having the author speak to you and the 12 Caesars is written like a conversation, and the conversational style makes it perfect for a voice actor to read.

The voice actor actually sounds like how you would imagine a Suetonius sounding like. Pompous, easy to pass judgment, with an outrageous Victorian voice.

I read somewhere that the ancients didn't read silently, and that scrolls where meant to be read out loud. Maybe this is why Seutonius wrote the way he did?

Seutonius is meant to be heard and with our technology, we can hear him speak (in English).

Trust me, he is a great eye witness. Suetonius' eyes saw another world and he heard the gossip of the slaves playing dice under the porticos, and he wrote it down. So until they invent a time machine, the audio is almost as good as being there.
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