The Little Book of Value Investing und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 2,04 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von The Little Book of Value Investing auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

The Little Book of Value Investing (Little Book, Big Profits) [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Christopher H. Browne , Roger Lowenstein

Statt: EUR 14,62
Jetzt: EUR 14,59 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 14 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Freitag, 25. Juli: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 12,55  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 14,59  
Audio CD, Audiobook --  
Unbekannter Einband --  

Kurzbeschreibung

22. September 2006 Little Book, Big Profits (Buch 6)
There are many ways to make money in today's market, but the one strategy that has truly proven itself over the years is value investing. Now, with The Little Book of Value Investing, Christopher Browne shows you how to use this wealth-building strategy to successfully buy bargain stocks around the world.

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

The Little Book of Value Investing (Little Book, Big Profits) + The Little Book of Valuation: How to Value a Company, Pick a Stock and Profit (Little Book, Big Profits) + The Little Book That Still Beats the Market (Little Book, Big Profits)
Preis für alle drei: EUR 51,69

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch


Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Fools would be well-served to place The Little Book of Value Investing on their holiday shopping lists". (Fool.com, December 12, 2006)
 
"sharply written...gets you fired up about buying stocks" (USA Today, December 4, 2006)
 
"elegant new treatise on the art of value investing. . ." (Financial Times (UK), October 30, 2006)
 
"...easily digestible and shortish treatise for anyone who wants to try out this particular investment strategy". (The Wall Street Journal, October 10, 2006)
 
"After 37 years of practicing what Graham preached, Browne has distilled the creed into a disarmingly chatty primer. . ." (Bloomberg)
 
"one of the best guidebooks toward protecting and growing a retirement nest egg. This advice comes from a legend of value investing, and it's presented with enough clarity that anyone can follow it." (Forbes.com)

"Fools would be well-served to place The Little Book of Value Investing on their holiday shopping lists". (Fool.com, December 12, 2006)
 
"sharply written...gets you fired up about buying stocks" (USA Today, December 4, 2006)
 
"If you are a value investor by temperament, you will (or should) find a lot that is persuasive in what Christopher Browne has to say about the craft of value investing in a delightful new book out this autumn...It is nicely written and utterly persuasive if long-term investment success is what you are after and your temperament is equipped to handle the psychological pressures of making non-consensus investments." (The Independent, November 2006)
 
"elegant new treatise on the art of value investing. . ." (Financial Times (UK), October 30, 2006)
 
"...easily digestible and shortish treatise for anyone who wants to try out this particular investment strategy". (The Wall Street Journal, October 10, 2006)
 
"After 37 years of practicing what Graham preached, Browne has distilled the creed into a disarmingly chatty primer. . ." (Bloomberg)
 
"one of the best guidebooks toward protecting and growing a retirement nest egg. This advice comes from a legend of value investing, and it's presented with enough clarity that anyone can follow it." (Forbes.com)

Synopsis

There are many ways to make money in today's market, but the one strategy that has truly proven itself over the years is value investing. Now, with "The Little Book of Value Investing", Christopher Browne shows you how to use this wealth-building strategy to successfully buy bargain stocks around the world.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Mehr entdecken
Wortanzeiger
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  68 Rezensionen
89 von 92 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A great introduction to value investing 2. Oktober 2006
Von Befragt - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
In the interest of full disclosure, it's best I state that I've been an extremely satisfied investor in the Tweedy Browne Global Value Fund for over a decade. The fund never does outstandingly well, but it also very seldom loses money. Over time, my initial investment has done surprisingly well.

This book should not surprise anyone who has read Tweedy Browne's shareholder letters, but it does a great job of synthesizing Tweedy Browne's investment philosophy, while also providing more in-depth discussion of how to research stocks and understand financial statements.

Chris Browne is a Benjamin Graham disciple, and his firm was labeled as on of the "Superinvestors of Graham and Doddsville" by Warren Buffett. This book might be characterized as a shorter, more readable version of Graham's "The Intelligent Investor."

It's important for anyone who might buy this book to understand what it is, and what it is not. This is a primer on value investing as applied to individual equities, not an in-depth treatise on how to invest, allocate assets, etc. The goal of this book is to show why value investing works, how it works, and how to implement an investing process. It does not, nor is it intended to, provide in-depth discussion about how to value companies or financial statements or how to assess competition. Keep in mind that this is a 180-page book that takes 2-3 hours to read.

Experienced investors might find parts of this book to be somewhat basic. However, starting with the chapter entitled "Sifting Out the Fool's Gold," it really imparts a lot of information that everybody should know (in that case, how to tell if a stock that meets screening criteria is really a value stock or a dud). The chapters about financial statement analysis and how to analyze a company's future prospects were well-written and provide an outstanding roadmap to analyzing a company that even more experienced investors would do well to heed.

The 16-point checklist in Chapter 14 ("Send Your Stocks to the Mayo Clinic") is an excellent way of examining a company to determine its competitive position and future prospects. In my opinion, that checklist and the related discussion alone are worth the price of the book.

The discussion on insider buying and selling was particularly interesting. Although this is part of many investor's decisions, the book demonstrates just how important insider buying can be as a value signal. I intend to pay more attention to insider buying as a result.

One particularly interesting aspect of this book is its discussion of international value investing. That overview should provide investors with examples of why value exists overseas, but most investors probably can't master the intricacies of non-US accounting methods.

This is a great book for less-experienced investors, and contains a number of nuggets that may be of use to even highly experienced investors. Readers who want a more depth might like Martin Whitman's two books or "Security Analysis" by Graham. However, these books can be tough reads, and for novice investors this book is a great place to start. Other good reads for investors are Joel Greenblatt's "You can be a stock market genius" and Dreman's "Contrarian Investing: the Next Generation."
61 von 64 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good advice but examine track record 5. Oktober 2006
Von P. Heneghan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
If you are new to value investing this book covers the basics. The research on the outperformance of value investing is well documented and if you follow the advice in this book you will do well in your stock investments.

I was curious how the Tweedy Browne mutual funds peformed though so I went to their web site. In each period - 1, 3, 5, 10 and since inception, the returns after taxes on distributions of the Tweedy Browne American Value have failed to beat the S&P 500 index or the Russell 2000 index. When I started investing 10 years ago I read a lot of books by many authors without checking their record first. And, as a result I made a lot of expensive mistakes. Just something to keep in mind when choosing whose advice to listent to!

I still give this book 4 stars because I believe the author gives sounds advice. However I would recommend "The Essays of Warren Buffett, Lessons for Corporate America", the classic "The Intelligent Investor" by Ben Graham, and "Contrarian Investment Strategies in the Next Generation" by David Dreman.
83 von 96 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Author's effort: 4 stars, Reader's gain: 2 stars... 23. November 2006
Von Jack Reader - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Unfortunately, this book has to follow the amusing and rewarding "Little Book" of Joel Greenblatt in Wiley's series. Therefore, unfavorable and perhaps unfair comparison is unavoidable. I do respect the experience and attempt of Christopher H. Browne to write a small book on value investing, but I feel he comes up short. If it was a friendly talk at a club you could find it mildly entertaining, but if you are looking for value, well...

First, value investing is not a strategy where a magic formula or a magic list could break an entirely new ground. Yet alone a "Little Book". You read just one value investing book and "Buy Stocks On Sale", "Margin of Safety", "First, Do Not Lose Money", "Second, Do Not Lose Money" pretty much become recurring and familiar ideas. There is no magic ratio, magic anything in analyzing income statements, earnings predictions, book value etc, it takes hard, thorough work, experience, patience and knowledge. You have to know what to know. You have to know what and where to look at. You have to know why. You have to know what, how and where numbers can be altered with GAAP or else. In this regard a reader could have expected at least a general(novel?)framework, a way of thinking instead of the presented essay-type, list-type ("I also look at...") writing. Or, like in Joel Greenblatt's book, we could have been entertained with a "Jason's Gum Shop"-type metaphore/concept.

Second, a reader of this book is either a convert and firm believer of value investing (Buffett, Munger, Fisher books pack the shelf), looking for additional ideas, NEW concepts or aspects and will find nothing new here. Or, the reader is a beginner or a freshly burned growth (hype)investor entertaining a fresh start and will be turned down by a dry, uninspiring, unexciting, somewhat disorganized book. Quite possibly this reader gives up, will leave this book unfinished and subscribes to yet another advisory service or dumps her/his money into an index or mutual fund. That is, not many readers would be enriched here.

Third, value investing is truly a winning strategy. So do not give up or get discouraged by this book. (Phil Town, David Dreman, Mary Buffett, Philip A. Fisher are good starts.)
22 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Now, this is value. 29. September 2006
Von Cabby - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
OK, I'm a value sort of guy. I look for bargains when I shop. But getting a bargain doesn't always mean `cheapest.' Cheapest can be a crummy product at a deservedly low price. Value is getting a good product at a fair price, and who among us doesn't want that? If I run my life like that, why not my investments? Well, I'm a `whatever it takes' sort of investor. Not a pro, but experienced and better than average. And, as I look back over my own investing, the one investment style that has outperformed all others is 'value.'

In the parlance of investing, as Chris Browne explains, value investing is buying good stocks not only at a fair price, but at bargain-basement prices. In "The Little Book" he shows us how to do it. If you're an experienced investor, the first few chapters may drag a bit as Browne lays the foundation, outlining the virtues of value investing and explaining how to determine a company's worth using common and not-so-common indicators. He also tells us how value stocks come to be `values' and when to invest in `value.' But this is good stuff and an important precursor to showing us how to uncover prospective value stocks, which he gets right into in chapters Six through Ten. Along with these, chapters Eleven through Fourteen are the meat of the book. Here we learn how to determine which of our suspects are truly values that are likely to make us money, the winners, and which of them are deservedly cheap, the losers, and are going to stay that way.

In the remainder of the book, Browne continues making a case for value investing, adding related conventional and not-so-conventional market wisdom, and contrasting value with other investing styles. Chapter Seventeen is entitled "It's a Marathon, Not a Sprint" and is subtitled "It's time in the market, not market timing, that counts." Indeed, that's what this is all about. Value investing is buy-and-hold with a twist. You buy historically good companies when the price is low relative to what the company is worth and hold until the price appreciates to nearer its true value. This can take some guts, but there is virtually nothing in the world of investments that will reap greater rewards over the long haul. Browne points out that value investing is also one of the better ways to hedge your bets, smoothing out the rough spots and market corrections, and he backs those claims up with real world numbers.

I really like this book and wish it had been written twenty years ago. But, I will warn you that this is not another one of those I-made-money-in-the-market-you-can-too books, written by someone who no longer trades, instead making a fortune doing nothing but hyping and selling get-rich-quick schemes. Nor is Browne one of those guys who rolls up his sleeves and screams into the TV camera. He is a practitioner. Better yet, he is a practitioner with a stellar thirty-five year track record in value investing. Even so, he's humble, a quality that makes his work here accessible. Browne learned from his father, who along with the current champ of value investing, Warren Buffett, learned from the father of value investing, Ben Graham. He says if he can do it, so can we and he tells us how in a succinct, friendly and straightforward manner.

For most, "The Little Book" is a quick 2-3 hour read. But Browne tells us this is not the quick way to riches. Value investing, he says, doesn't take a lot of brain power or specialized skill. Rather, it takes work and patience. Browne does not promise that if you buy and read "The Little Book of Value Investing," you'll begin seeing dividend checks in the mail the next and every day. What he does do, though, is give the average investor solid advice and sensible techniques for going about the task of amassing wealth through value investing. And, he does all that for a mere $20. Now, that's value.
19 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Value investing oversimplified--poorly explained and unfocused 14. August 2007
Von bixodoido - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The Little Book of Value Investing is billed as an introduction to value investing--as a quick way to learn the tenets of this particular investment style and to lay a groundwork for either choosing a fund to manage your money or for further research. Instead it is a superficial look at value investing, quickly glossing over some very important aspects of choosing a company, failing to warn of the potential pitfalls that may arise, and presenting value investing as the only `safe' way to invest, which it is not. A value investing approach can fail in the market as well, and this book more or less refuses to acknowledge that.

This is one of those investing books I put in the "avoid" category for the simple reason that it provides just enough information to go out and get yourself hurt in the stock market. It skims the surface of many basic value investing tenets without going into enough detail to really help someone choose a company adequately. Worse yet it seems to set someone up perfectly for a "value trap"--a company that appears cheap when you examine it but which ends up performing very poorly for years after you buy it. An example: Browne explains price to earnings and argues that lower is better, advising that one of the primary criteria for value stocks is a low P/E relative to the market. He gives the example of some banks to show a low P/E stock. That's all well and good, but it's important to recognize that financials traditionally have lower P/Es than many other industries. If you really want to find value you need to evaluate a company's P/E relative to its historic price to earnings ratio, as well as compare it to the P/E of it's peers. Buying an integrated oil company at 15 times earnings will seem cheap if you've been looking at stocks with P/Es of 20, but if the company's peers are trading at 10 times earnings it does you little good.

Browne's example seems dangerous to me, as do many others he gives. When advising screening for a low P/E he never mentions a potential pitfall--that low P/E stocks can quickly turn into high P/E stocks if earnings estimates are slashed. A good example of this was homebuilding stocks in late 2006. Some of them were selling at 4 times earnings, but only until the earnings estimates were cut to the point that the P/E ratio suddenly became high and then in some cases ceased to exist as these companies began losing money. Browne's argument that stocks trading close to book value have a margin of safety is also flawed-what if the book value includes a bunch of real estate (again, homebuilders being a prime example) that was purchased high and is now declining in value?

It's not that Browne's advice is bad--it's just that it's limited and very incomplete. I feel it is important when teaching about investing to treat both the benefits AND the risks of a particular style of investing, and Browne fails to do that. Instead he acts as if following the simple methods he sets forth will give you a margin of safety (a la Ben Graham) that is foolproof. It is not.

My biggest problem with the book, however, stems from the fact that only about half of it has anything to do with investing at all. Browne rambles from time to time throughout the first half of the book, touching upon various principles here and there in a more or less disorganized manner. About 2/3 of the way through the book, however, he abandons any actual teaching, and spends most of the last 50 or so pages grinding his personal axes against clients, growth investing, bubbles, and a whole slew of other topics. That part of the book is useless in my opinion, especially since most of it is a rehash of things he ranted on earlier in the book.

When it's all said and done I cannot conceive why anyone would benefit from reading this book. If you're interested and are new to value investing this book, which can be read easily in one sitting, will not provide you the groundwork you need. If you're already a student, or at least a casual observer, of value investing you won't need someone to explain what a P/E ratio is to you and why lower is often better. Skip this one-if you want to learn about value investing there are many books out there that will provide you with the actual groundwork you need without glossing over and dismissing the limitations.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar