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Linux Device Drivers
 
 

Linux Device Drivers [Kindle Edition]

Jonathan Corbet , Alessandro Rubini , Greg Kroah-Hartman
4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 17,30 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Kindle Edition EUR 17,30  
Taschenbuch EUR 24,95  


Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Updated to cover version 2.4.x of the Linux kernel, the second edition of Linux Device Drivers remains the best general-purpose, paper-bound guide for programmers wishing to make hardware devices work under the world's most popular open-source operating system. The authors take care to show how to write drivers that are portable--that is, that compile and run under all popular Linux platforms. That, along with the fact that they're careful to explain and illustrate concepts, makes this book very well suited to any programmer familiar with C but not with the hardware-software interface. It's worth noting that the emphasis in the title is on "device drivers" as much as "Linux." This book will make sense to you if you've never written a driver for any platform before. It helps if you have some Linux or Unix background, but even that is secondary as a prerequisite to C skill.

For a programming text--and one concerned with low-level instructions and data structures, at that--this book is remarkably rich in prose. You'll typically want to read this book straight through, more or less skipping the code samples, before sketching out your plan for the driver you need to write. Then, go back and pay closer attention to the sections on specific details you need to implement, like custom task queues. For coding-time details about specific system calls and programming techniques, count on the index to point you to the right passages. --David Wall

Topics covered: Techniques for writing hardware device drivers that run under Linux kernels 2.0.x through 2.2.x. Sections show how to manage memory, time, interrupts, ports, and other details of the hardware-software interface.

Amazon.co.uk

Updated to cover version 2.4.x of the Linux kernel, the second edition of Linux Device Drivers remains the best general-purpose, paper-bound guide for programmers wishing to make hardware devices work under the world's most popular open-source operating system. The authors take care to show how to write drivers that are portable--that is, that compile and run under all popular Linux platforms. That, along with the fact that they're careful to explain and illustrate concepts, makes this book very well-suited to any programmer familiar with C but not with the hardware-software interface. It's worth noting that the emphasis in the title is on "device drivers" as much as "Linux". This book will make sense to you if you've never written a driver for any platform before. It helps if you have some Linux or UNIX background, but even that is secondary as a prerequisite to C skill.

For a programming text--and one concerned with low-level instructions and data structures, at that--this book is remarkably rich in prose. You'll typically want to read this book straight through, more or less skipping the code samples, before sketching out your plan for the driver you need to write. Then, go back and pay closer attention to the sections on specific details you need to implement, such as custom task queues. For coding-time details about specific system calls and programming techniques, count on the index to point you to the right passages. --David Wall

Topics covered: Techniques for writing hardware device drivers that run under Linux kernels 2.0.x through 2.2.x. Sections show how to manage memory, time, interrupts, ports and other details of the hardware-software interface.


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 1562 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 638 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0596005903
  • Gleichzeitige Verwendung von Geräten: Keine Einschränkung
  • Verlag: O'Reilly Media; Auflage: 3 (9. Februar 2009)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0026OR2XQ
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #221.982 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Kundenrezensionen

4.2 von 5 Sternen
4.2 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
3.0 von 5 Sternen great book - but obsolete 13. August 2014
Von x
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
This book is well written to get into the details of Linux device driver writing - certainly for someone who knows some C and something about OS internals.

However, it's geared towards older versions of Linux kernels, so for current releases there are subtle differences which can be
figured out at the usual cost of search, digest, and try. (one might blame Amazon for selling "old" books)

What I found also missing, are the up-to-date sources of the sample drivers. But updating the old sources to the new kernel is of course a great learning experience, though maybe not the desire of everyone.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Von Dragan
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Habe die ersten Kapitel gelesen, musste es dann aus Zeitmangel kurz bei Seite legen. Für einen Neuling auf dem Gebiet meiner Meinung nach perfekt, ein gewisses Basiswissen ist jedoch nicht schlecht, ohne tut man sich ein wenig schwerer. Nichts desto trotz würde ich das Buch jedem empfehlen und wieder kaufen.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen Go ahead! Buy it....... it rocks! 22. April 2008
Von The NAF
Format:Taschenbuch
When I started reading this book, the first thing that I didn't like was, there were no comprehensive examples which you could type and run to see the code in action. The code is scattered in small bits all over, but once you get used to the fact that this is about device drivers and not programming, you appreciate it. Only the relevant and explained code is put at any given point so you see only already referenced material.

I consider this book also as a sort of introduction to the Linux kernel because it does the job of explaining drivers so well. I recommend reading the book through quickly and then again, this time writing your own drivers. You'll be up to speed in no time.
Yes, it's that good!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen a book - quite comprehensive and rather thick 10. Juli 2014
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Wenn Sie tatsächlich einen Linux-Treiber schreiben wollen oder müssen, dann kaufen Sie diese Buch. Es wird Ihnen gute Dienste leisten.

Wenn Sie "nur mal so" reinschauen wollen, ist es meiner Meinung nach zu teuer.

Es ist recht umfangreich und brauchbar gegliedert. Man kommt damit zurecht.

Den fünften Stern hätte ich vergeben, wenn das Buch
* etwas straffer gefasst wäre
* dafür die übergeordneten Prinzipien klarer herausgestellt hätte (dann muss man viele Dinge gar nicht mehr im Detail nachlesen)
* und noch ein paar "best practise" Ansätze eingebracht hätte. Z.B. eine Kapitel "typische Fehler und was man dagegen tut".

Chromglanz-Lösung wäre eine downloadbare VM mit der man gleich losprobieren könnte.

Fazit:
Ganz ordentlich.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  30 Rezensionen
17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Highly Overrated, but the only text on the market. 15. Juli 2010
Von d. time - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Honestly, I really don't understand how anyone can give this book 5 stars. To start off on a positive tone, I'll say what I liked about it.

1) Lots of information. There is no denying this, it is very informitive. However, this is a double edged swords (will discuss later)

2) The basic drivers are described pretty well. The scull driver is a good way to ease into driver development, imo. Simple enough that it's not too overwhelming and ununderstandable, but not overly simple so that you actually get an idea of what's going on.

3) It's free.

That's it for the positives. Now for a huge list of negatives.

1) Most of the information is irrelevent. I feel like the authors lost focus as the book went on, and forgot they were not writing a general "Linux Kernel" book but a specific book for drivers. Many a time do they spend pages upon pages going on about something, only to mention "but this is never used by read driver developers" at the end. You end up in a really unpleasant situation where you have to sift through a bunch of useless info to get to the useful stuff. Most of the time I ended up just searching google, and got better results.

2) Lack of more complex examples. Let's face it, no one needs to write an extremely simple char driver. However, that's as complex as the examples get. Beyond the scull driver, it's just code fragments. I sincerely hope you don't have to write a serial tty device. Which leads me to my next point.

3) Outdated. Many kernel API changes have been made to the point where the code is no longer compilable (especially on the tty front). Methods used in the book have been done away with in the newer kernel API's.

Honestly, you're much better off just resorting to Google. If you want to write your own driver and you read through this book, you'll still have no idea where to start. The functions in the scull driver are well-described, but that's it. The authors use too much space writing about useless crap you really don't care about, and this comes at the expense of useful info
that will actually help you write drivers.

This book will probably come up on your google searches, and it might be worth it to skim the regular chapters. Honestly though, it's not going to tell you anything your other search results won't. This is most definitely not the "end all, be all" of writing linux drivers, it just happens to be the only one.
11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen 3rd edition is somewhat outdated by now, needs to be updated 27. Dezember 2012
Von Gregor A. Glawitsch - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I bought this book specifically to learn how to write a block device driver for CentOS 6.3 / RHEL 6.3

Alas, Linux has moved on since the 3rd edition was printed (2009) and kernel functions used in the example code, like elv_next_request(), or macros like blk_fs_request(), have since been *removed* from Linux, rendering this book somewhat obsolete.

For my driver, I need worker threads, and these can be implemented by means of workqueues.
Workqueues are a very important tool for the driver writer - basically, they are the kernel equivalent of user-space pthreads. If you want your driver to do things in parallel, you pretty much have to use workqueues.
Unfortunately, while there is a section on workqueues in this book, this section is rather short - just a few pages long.

All in all, this book did not meet my expectations.
8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good reference on Linux subsystems, not a book for starters 13. Oktober 2006
Von Vijay Venkatraman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is not for Linux (kernel) newbies but for those who already know their way around the kernel and seek detailed info on certain parts of it. This book has some good overviews on different subsystems of the Linux kernel. Some sections, like USB, have been expanded since the second edition of this book. I would have liked to see a section on the new 2.6 scheduler.

If you want to start off with Linux kernel programming, I would recommend Linux Kernel Development by Robert Love. These books, together with articles on the web, should certainly help anyone interested.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Becoming dated but still best on the subject 1. Juli 2011
Von Magnus Gille - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is becoming dated and it is showing sometimes. Some APIs no longer work or have changed but such is the nature of the Linux kernel and as a device driver developer you should be prepared to face this. Thankfully there hasn't been any major change (such as removing of bottom halves) although there are things on the horizon that will have an impact on this books subject. I wish the authors would consider writing a 4th edition of it, but this is as I said still the best on the subject as far as I know and I use it all the time when I'm developing device drivers.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A good balance of "How" and "Why" 9. Mai 2009
Von Yong Zhi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I have read both this book and Sreekrishnan Venkateswaran's Essential Linux Device Drivers, both are excellent, I prefer this one on generic topics such as:

Chapter 5. Concurrency and race conditions
Chapter 8. Allocating memory
Chapter 10. Interrupt Handling
Chapter 14. The Linux Device Model

How ever Sreekrishnan's book covers video and audio driver which are useful for my work.

As for styles, both keep a good balance of "how" and "why", I think the "why" parts are more important, the whole s/w is all about concepts.
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&quote;
two macros that can be used to obtain the major and minor number from an inode: unsigned int iminor(struct inode *inode); unsigned int imajor(struct inode *inode); &quote;
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&quote;
The ioctl command numbers should be unique across the system in order to prevent errors caused by issuing the right command to the wrong device. &quote;
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&quote;
Be careful with uninitialized memory; any memory obtained from the kernel should be zeroed or otherwise initialized before being made available to a user process or device. &quote;
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