Life Out of Sequence und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 3,81 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von Life Out of Sequence auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

Life Out of Sequence: A Data-Driven History of Bioinformatics [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Hallam Stevens

Preis: EUR 22,30 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 3 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Dienstag, 2. September: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 17,88  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 71,96  
Taschenbuch EUR 22,30  

Kurzbeschreibung

26. November 2013
Thirty years ago, biologists worked at laboratory benches, peering down microscopes, surrounded by petri dishes. Today, they are just as likely to be found in an office, poring over lines of code on computers. The use of computers in biology has radically transformed who biologists are, what they do, and how they understand life. In Life Out of Sequence, Hallam Stevens looks inside this new landscape of digital scientific work. Stevens chronicles the emergence of bioinformatics - the mode of working across and between biology, computing, mathematics, and statistics - from the 1960s to the present, seeking to understand how knowledge about life is made in and through virtual spaces. He shows how scientific data moves from living organisms into DNA sequencing machines, through software, and into databases, images, and scientific publications. What he reveals is a biology very different from the one of predigital days: a biology that includes not only biologists but also highly interdisciplinary teams of managers and workers; a biology that is more centered on DNA sequencing, but one that understands sequence in terms of dynamic cascades and highly interconnected networks. Life Out of Sequence thus offers the computational biology community welcome context for their own work while also giving the public a frontline perspective of what is going on in this rapidly changing field.

Kunden, die diesen Artikel angesehen haben, haben auch angesehen


Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"What happens to biology with computerization? Hallam Stevens's compelling ethnographic and historical narrative shows how the nature of the biological experiment has changed with the increasing use of the tools of information technology in life science and biomedicine." (Hannah Landecker, University of California, Los Angeles)"

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Hallam Stevens is assistant professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 von 5 Sternen  3 Rezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen The power to define biology 23. Juli 2014
Von florian.markowetz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Hallam Stevens’ book is a great read for anybody interested in the future of biology.

The central thesis of Stevens’ book can be summarized by a famous quote often (incorrectly) attributed to Marshall McLuhan: “We shape our tools and then our tools shape us.” Computational methods of data storage and analysis had been shaped in physics and were then adapted in biological research, in particular the Human Genome Process. Stevens argues that computers did not change to become useful to biology, in the contrary: "Biology adapted itself to the computer, not the computer to biology." (p41)

Computers do not just scale up the old biology, they bring with them completely new tools and questions, like statistics, simulation, and data management, that completely re-shaped the way biological research is being done. Bioinformatics is at the center of major discussions about the self-image of biology, which started when biologists confronted with high-dimensional statistics, scale-free networks and other tools of systems biology fought back by stating the importance of focussed hypotheses and small-scale experimental validations.

Stevens clearly describes how these discussion are not only scientific — they are about power. The power to define biology.
1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Great read for this computer guy 17. März 2014
Von Tech Historian - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
How did bioinformatics get to be the engine that drives genomics?
A great overview of the intersection of computing and biology for the non-biology major.
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Too short 21. Mai 2014
Von Trent Waddington - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This enjoyable glimpse into the world of biological research is over too soon, failing to capture more than the author's memoirs.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar