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Liars & Thieves: A Novel (Tommy Carmellini)
 
 

Liars & Thieves: A Novel (Tommy Carmellini) [Kindle Edition]

Stephen Coonts

Kindle-Preis: EUR 4,47 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

From Publishers Weekly

Readers accustomed to having series hero Jake Grafton save the world every year (Liberty; Cuba; etc.) may be disappointed to learn he's retiredâ€"but they won't fret for long. Former Grafton sidekick Tommy Carmellini, ex-burglar and CIA operative, has been promoted to star in what's sure to be another excellent, long-lived series. Tommy is hanging out with partner Willie the Wire when ex-girlfriend Dorsey O'Shea turns up asking favors: will Tommy break into a house and retrieve some sex tapes in which she has unwittingly participated? No problemâ€"he hands the tapes over and dismisses Dorsey from his mind. Several months later, the CIA sends him to a West Virginia safe house where Russian defector Mikhail Goncharov is being debriefedâ€"and there, Tommy stumbles into a full-blown massacre. He kills a couple of attackers, rescues a woman, beats a retreat and quickly finds himself in spy hell: out in the cold, accused, alone, hunted by friend and foe alike. As the plot snowballs, it accumulates characters both good and bad: Goncharov has escaped the safe house but has amnesia; Dorsey returns; deadly assassins try to kill Tommy; and evil politicians scheme. (One of them, a woman, is determined to become president of the United States, no matter what: "Give me four years to line up support and be seen by the public and I could beat Jesus Christ in the next election.") Tommy is smart, brave, skilled and possessed of enough self-deprecating, wisecracking wit to endear him to readers. Jake Grafton makes an appearance to help save the day, but Tommy proves himself more than capable of saving the world on his own.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Readers first met Tommy Carmellini, an ex-burglar and CIA agent, in the Jake Grafton novel Cuba (1999). He usually works overseas, breaking and entering for Uncle Sam, planting bugs, stealing documents, "that kind of thing." Now in Coonts' nineteenth novel (for those readers who are still counting), Carmellini replaces Grafton as the hero-protagonist who is^B out to save the world. It involves the usual gorgeous woman; this one is being blackmailed and wants Carmellini, her former lover, to get some incriminating videotapes that a later boyfriend had made when they were dating. The plot also involves a massacre at a CIA safe house, an illegal break-in, and secret KGB files. Like other of Coonts' heroes, Carmellini faces all sorts of dangers as he seeks to solve the case. As in the previous books, adroit dialogue abounds (for instance, "I was dripping wet with perspiration. If they didn't hear me coming, they would smell me"). Predictably, the hero outwits the bad guys, and, predictably, this latest Coonts tale will hit the best-seller lists. And, predictably, librarians should purchase multiple copies. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 489 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 420 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0312936214
  • Verlag: St. Martin's Press (11. Mai 2004)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B003HOXLW0
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #85.962 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  74 Rezensionen
16 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Stephen Coonts writing like Mickey Spillane 16. Februar 2005
Von Rennie Petersen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
"Liars & Thieves" (published as "Wages of Sin" in Europe) is a quite different book from the Jake Grafton series that made Stephen Coonts famous. Personally, I don't like the change in style.

I'm a fan of thrillers, especially international thrillers and techno-thrillers. I like most of Stephen Coonts' books and consider them to be "the thinking man's thriller", a notch up on the intellectual scale from Tom Clancy, for example.

"Liars & Thieves" is different from the Jake Grafton series in many ways. To start with, the main character is Tommy Carmellini, a CIA operative who plays a secondary role in the last four Jake Grafton books.

Tommy Carmellini reminds me of Mike Hammer, the fictional hero of Mickey Spillane's books. He's physically big, he's tough and doesn't shun violence, he's great with the fast-paced repartee and he doesn't claim to be all that smart. Women find him attractive (what's with these silly women anyway?) and he beds them without much emotional involvement. And he tells his story in the first person.

Fortunately, Stephen Coonts is not 100% loyal to the first-person style. As the book progresses there are more and more passages that tell parts of the story that Tommy Carmellini can't tell because he's not at that location.

There is a lot of violence in this book, something that doesn't particularly appeal to me. The body count rises slowly but surely through the story, with Tommy personally killing 13 of the "bad guys"! These shootouts and other fights are described in detail, and are exciting at first, but about half way through the book it gets tedious.

The romantic (to use the word very loosely) subplots are very minor. Tommy succeeds (without trying or particularly enjoying it) in bedding three of the female characters. But if Tommy doesn't really care much one way or the other, why should we?

The weirdest scene in the whole book is when Tommy makes love to one of the women in a bugged hotel room, knowing that his best friend is monitoring the bugs! The fact that he doesn't particularly like the lady in question just added to my incredulity!

A general problem with the whole book is that the characters are poorly presented and not very believable. Surprising, considering that Stephen Coonts is otherwise very good at writing books populated with real people.

In particular, Tommy Carmellini doesn't come across as a believable person. To make it worse, he isn't a person that I find all that appealing. He's great at shooting holes in the bad guys and making clever remarks, but I'd prefer a leading "good guy" who is smarter and displays more real human characteristics.

On the plus side, the plot is pretty good. The story is partly based on the real-life defection of Vasili Mitrokhin, the KGB archivist who arrived in Great Britain in 1992 with six suitcases of notes from classified KGB files! Mix this with an American presidential nomination and people in high places with a past that is damaging to their political careers and you have an exciting cocktail.

Still, the good plot can't compensate for the disappointing characters and the repetitive violence, so I'm only giving three stars to "Liars & Thieves".

Rennie Petersen
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Reasonably good techno-espionage thriller 21. Juni 2004
Von Thomas Duff - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Stephen Coonts' latest novel, Liars & Thieves, is a reasonably good techo-espionage thriller set in the United States. Tommy Carmellini is a CIA agent who happens to stumble upon a CIA safehouse as a massacre is going down. The disturbing part is that the killers are most definitely from the US and look professional (either military or law enforcement). Carmellini is able to rescue one lady who is a Russian interpreter debriefing a Russian defector that was an archivist for the government and copied seven cases of materials over the years. The defector is able to escape on his own, but his age and failing memory leaves him in a state of confusion as to where he is and what's happening. The killers figure out who Carmellini is, and he (and anyone around him) is now a target of someone who appears to be high up in the government, and wants everything related to the defector (including the defector himself) eliminated to protect a secret. Carmellini enlists the help of Jake Grafton (a major character from earlier Coontz novels) to get to the bottom of the mystery and to stay alive.
I'd give this a higher rating if it weren't for a stretch before the final showdown takes place. Through the first half of the book, someone is after Carmellini is being hunted every time he turns around. Once he decides to go to New York to try a last effort to uncover the truth, he ends up being left alone for a number of days while he sets up survellience and listening bugs. Then at the end, he's conveniently a walking target again and nearly gets killed at every turn. The break just didn't seem to fit too well in the story flow. That fact notwithstanding, it's an entertaining read that will entertain you for awhile.
9 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I Coud Not Put This Book Down 27. Januar 2006
Von Alan L. Chase - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Mini-Review: "Liars & Thieves" by Stephen Coonts

I have many things for which I am indebted to my friend, John Byington. One of those debts is that fact that he introduced me to author Stephen Coonts - not to be confused with Dean Koontz! A few years ago, John, an Annapolis graduate and former Navy aviator, made the following observation: "You have come to know quite a few of us Navy guys who were pilots. If you really want to understand the world of naval aviation, you should read Stephen Coonts' "Flight of the Intruder."

I did read "Flight of the Intruder," and vowed to read as many of Coonts' other books as I could. Last year I enjoyed reading "Liberty," and I have just completed the riveting "Liars & Thieves." Coonts is a Viet Nam combat veteran and naval aviator, who went on to earn a law degree. He writes with a rapier wit and an acerbic and sardonic view of a world inhabited with a wide assortment of "bad guys," and a few old-fashioned heroes. Here is an example of his wry gift for introducing a character and setting the right tone:

"Obviously Dorsey had not considered the possibility that Willie might refuse to tell her whatever she asked. Few men ever had. She was young, beautiful, rich, the modern trifectas for females. She came by her dough the old-fashioned way - she inherited it. Her parents died in a car wreck shortly after she was born. Her grandparents who raised her passed away while she was partying at college, trying to decide if growing up would be worth the effort. Now she lived in a monstrous old brick mansion on five hundred acres, all that remained of a colonial plantation, on the northern bank of the Potomac thirty miles upriver from Washington. It was a nice little getaway if you were worth a couple hundred million, and she was." (Page 2)

The plot of this book involves double-dealing all the way from the Kremlin to the West Wing of the White House, as the two heroes, Tommy Carmellini and retired Admiral Jake Grafton, lay their lives on the line to try to save a former KGB official who has defected to the West. I won't spoil the treat for you by revealing anything else about the story line.

I could not put the book down. What else is there to say about a book!

Enjoy.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Good book, but somewhat unrealistic 11. Oktober 2004
Von George Smith - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This book is a good book, especially if you haven't read a lot of realitic military fiction. This book has a character that is a lot like James Bond, the invincible spy. After a while, this character's unrealistic achievements ruin the book. Many of the things don't make sense if you think about them. One of the things that is most incongrous is that a group of soldiers is able to overrun CIA's specially trained guard troops, but then is consistently defeated by a signle agent.

Things like this happen throughout the book, and all the while people are dying. It seems that one character is able to handle the world, something that everyone should know isn't true. If you want a book with a lot of shooting action, this is for you. If you want a book with real substance, you's be better off looking somewhere else.
6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Stephen Coonts writing like Mickey Spillane 22. September 2005
Von Rennie Petersen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
"Wages of Sin" (European title, published as "Liars & Thieves" in N. America) is a quite different book from the Jake Grafton series that made Stephen Coonts famous. Personally, I don't like the change in style.

I'm a fan of thrillers, especially international thrillers and techno-thrillers. I like most of Stephen Coonts' books and consider them to be "the thinking man's thriller", a notch up on the intellectual scale from Tom Clancy, for example.

"Wages of Sin" is different from the Jake Grafton series in many ways. To start with, the main character is Tommy Carmellini, a CIA operative who plays a secondary role in the last four Jake Grafton books.

Tommy Carmellini reminds me of Mike Hammer, the fictional hero of Mickey Spillane's books. He's physically big, he's tough and doesn't shun violence, he's great with the fast-paced repartee and he doesn't claim to be all that smart. Women find him attractive (what's with these silly women anyway?) and he beds them without much emotional involvement. And he tells his story in the first person.

Fortunately, Stephen Coonts is not 100% loyal to the first-person style. As the book progresses there are more and more passages that tell parts of the story that Tommy Carmellini can't tell because he's not at that location.

There is a lot of violence in this book, something that doesn't particularly appeal to me. The body count rises slowly but surely through the story, with Tommy personally killing 13 of the "bad guys"! These shootouts and other fights are described in detail, and are exciting at first, but about half way through the book it gets tedious.

The romantic (to use the word very loosely) subplots are very minor. Tommy succeeds (without trying or particularly enjoying it) in bedding three of the female characters. But if Tommy doesn't really care much one way or the other, why should we?

The weirdest scene in the whole book is when Tommy makes love to one of the women in a bugged hotel room, knowing that his best friend is monitoring the bugs! The fact that he doesn't particularly like the lady in question just added to my incredulity!

A general problem with the whole book is that the characters are poorly presented and not very believable. Surprising, considering that Stephen Coonts is otherwise very good at writing books populated with real people.

In particular, Tommy Carmellini doesn't come across as a believable person. To make it worse, he isn't a person that I find all that appealing. He's great at shooting holes in the bad guys and making clever remarks, but I'd prefer a leading "good guy" who is smarter and displays more real human characteristics.

On the plus side, the plot is pretty good. The story is partly based on the real-life defection of Vasili Mitrokhin, the KGB archivist who arrived in Great Britain in 1992 with six suitcases of notes from classified KGB files! Mix this with an American presidential nomination and people in high places with a past that is damaging to their political careers and you have an exciting cocktail.

Still, the good plot can't compensate for the disappointing characters and the repetitive violence, so I'm only giving three stars to "Wages of Sin".

Rennie Petersen
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