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Lapsing into a Comma: A Curmudgeon's Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print - And How to Avoid Them [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Bill Walsh
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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Who knew a stylebook could be so much fun? For lovers of language, Lapsing Into a Comma is a sensible and very funny guide to the technicalities of writing and copy editing. Author Bill Walsh, chief copy editor in the business section of the Washington Post, humorously discusses the changing rules of proper print style in the information age. Is it "e-mail" or "email"? According to established grammatical rules, it should be e-mail, but in common practice, we often use email (which should be pronounced "uhmail," but we all know not to do that). Therefore, email is OK.

Walsh does not advocate tossing your AP Stylebook, but he does encourage using your head and not blindly adhering to formal rules. "A finely tuned ear is at least as important as formal grammar," he says, "and that's not something you can acquire by memorizing a stylebook." What about companies that use punctuation in their logos? Walsh cautions against confusing a logo with a name. You wouldn't use "Tech Stock Surge Boosts Yahoo!" as a headline unless you wrote for a very excitable newspaper. And then there's arbitrary capitalization. "The dot-com era has leveled a wall that Adidas and K.D. Lang and Thirtysomething had already cracked," says Walsh, "and suddenly writers and editors faced with a name are asking, "Is that capitalized?"--a question that's about as appropriate as asking a 5-year-old, 'Do you want that Coke with or without rum?'"

The first half of Lapsing Into a Comma zips along, making you think about the intricacies of grammar and editing--all while trying not to choke on laughter. The second half is Walsh's personally crafted style guide. Remember--Roommate: Two m's, unless you ate a room or mated with a roo. --Dana Van Nest

Synopsis

No writer's or editor's desk is complete without a battered, page-bent copy of the "AP Stylebook". However, this not-so-easy-to-use reference of journalistic style is often not up-to-date and leaves reporters and copyeditors unsatisfied. Bill Walsh, copy chief for the "Washington Post"'s business desk, addresses these shortcomings in "Lapsing into a Comma". In an opinionated, humorous, and yes, curmudge only way, he shows how to apply the basic rules to unique, modern grammar issues. Walsh explains how to deal with perplexing situations such as trendy words, foreign terms, and web speak.

Autorenkommentar

A Stylebook With Style
Call it "grammar" if you like, but using words and punctuation marks correctly is more about common sense than it is about memorizing dusty old textbooks. Using real-world examples, not English-teacher-speak, I stand firm on some usage chestnuts (never use "which" when you mean "that") but knock down others (such as "never split infinitives") in this up-to-date, pop-culture-filled guide to modern American usage. You'll laugh, you'll learn -- not bad for $14.95.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Bill Walsh is the copy chief for the Washington Post's business desk. He also runs a website, www.theslot.com, where he answers questions about style and grammar.
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