Knowledge and the Flow of Information und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 27,80
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 3 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Knowledge and the Flow of... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 1,00 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Knowledge and the Flow of Information (The David Hume Series) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 28. Mai 1999


Alle 4 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 27,80
EUR 20,94 EUR 32,25
8 neu ab EUR 20,94 2 gebraucht ab EUR 32,25

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Knowledge and the Flow of Information (The David Hume Series) + The Varieties of Reference (Clarendon Paperbacks)
Preis für beide: EUR 57,75

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 288 Seiten
  • Verlag: The Center for the Study of Language and Information Publications; Auflage: Revised. (28. Mai 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 157586195X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1575861951
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 15,2 x 2,5 x 22,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 286.592 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"The author of this book is a philosopher, and he has written primarily to and for other philosophers. This work, however, is of interest to contemporary cognitive psychologists because Dretske has attempted to extend the concept of information into types of information similar to what we would commonly call knowledge. Indeed, cognitive scientists who are more broadly concerned with the nature of knowledge and language comprehension will be interested in "Knowledge and the Flow of Information"."--Wendell R. Garner, "Contemporary Psychology" -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Über das Produkt

This volume presents an attempt to develop a theory of knowledge using ideas derived from the mathematical theory of communication developed by Claude Shannon. Information is seen as an objective commodity defined by the dependency relations between distinct events. Knowledge is then analyzed as information caused belief.

Kundenrezensionen

3.0 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
1
4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
1
Beide Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Amazon Customer am 4. Februar 2001
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
If you are fascinated by any kind of problem refering to the human mind - and want to learn anything substantial - start with that book. If the brain is the organ to deliver information (and, of course, to steer the body through the environment by employing this information), Dretske simply had to be successful in obtaining a great deal of naturalistic insights in the nature of mind completely different from those "mind is nothing but this or that type of brain-process"-stupidities. By the way: Dretske's later books, especially "Explaining Behaviour" and "Naturalising the mind", are even better. He's definitely my favourite philosopher.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Brad McCormick am 25. Februar 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
I was required to read this book in grad school (I was embarrassed for the teacher, since the selection reflects on the selector). It is a genuinely awful book. The style was (for me, at least) indigestible. The main thesis of the book, that *meaning* -- as opposed to bit configurations -- can be *quantified* is not just nonsense, but *frightening* nonsense, since quantifying everything gets funded these days. The book is worth buying if you want to discover how appalling what Joseph Weizenbaum described in his fine book: "Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to calculation" can get!
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 Rezensionen
41 von 42 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An excellent book 30. Oktober 2000
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a classic, well worth reading for those with any kind of interest in contemporary epistemology or the philosophy of mind. Dretske develops an ingenious and elegant theory of informational content, and then puts it to work giving information-theoretic analyses of knowledge, perception, beliefs and concepts. Not surprisingly, since he's tackling hard problems, there are difficulties with these, and Dretske himself has changed his position quite a bit since 1981. But in each case his attack on the problem at hand is of at least as much interest as where he ends up. Dretske begins his account of perception, for instance, by reworking the analogue/digital distinction, using the modified version to give a clear and plausible account of the distinction between perceptual and cognitive processes. Whatever the fate of his theory of perception itself, this a good idea, and has been deservedly influential. The book is filled with good ideas of this kind.
Finally, a comment on the preceding review. The claim that meaning can be quantified is neither the main nor any other thesis of Dretske's book, and foisting it on him is wildly unfair. Drestke clearly and often distinguishes between the meaning of a sign and the information it carries. Moreover, his account of informational content certainly isn't just communication theory in disguise, as he hammers home time and again. As if this wasn't enough, early in chapter 2 Dretske explicitly rejects as absurd the claim that the amount of meaning in a message can be measured. Since warning lights of these kinds appear in the preface and regularly in every chapter thereafter, the preceding reviewer must indeed have found Dretske's (perfectly lucid) prose indigestible. There's every sign that he just hasn't bothered to digest it.
4 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
a classic 8. Oktober 2003
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
~It's kinda nonsense to call a thought nonsense without any argument against it. It is in fact a totally sensible position (actually many great philosophers hold it) to consider meaning as quantifiable.
This book is a classic of both epistemology and philosophy of mind. I don't agree with Dretske that our cognition is only concerned with digitalization, so that perception is mainly out of conceptualization. But the application of digital/analog distiction is really helpful to understand our~~ cognition in terms of information flowing. As one reader said, I really like this part of the book.
Also, his contribution to the definition of knowledge should not be neglected. There are a few philosophers who think of knowledge in terms of information, rather than in terms of justification. Although few people are interested with knowledge now, this line of thought is very intuitive and elegant.
It's been more than 20 years, since this book was published. But still, many parts of this~~ book help to understand more contemporary discussions of epistemology and philosophy of mind.~
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Five Stars 4. August 2014
Von José Monserrat Neto - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I WANT TO SEE THE TABLE CONTENTS OF AMAZON BOOKS!!!
3 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Not something to spend time with. 28. Februar 2010
Von Real Name - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Dretske starts with Claude Shannon's mathematical theory of communication, and from this foundation, tries to justify a semantic theory of information and explain something about perception, meaning, and belief.

In this book, Dretske reminds one of a philosopher who, upon understanding the beauty in a small portion of applied mathematics, tries to explain the world with his newly found tool. Of course he does not explain the world; only expansive topics of perception, meaning, and belief. Dretske is clearly awed by Shannon's innovative work--we can excuse him for that. Shannon's theory opened up an entire field of study and technology.

For those who already understand the mathematics of information theory, Dretske takes the well-defined mathematical concept of mutual information and evaluates it at a particular value, in symbols:

I(S;R=ri)=H(S)-H(S|R=ri), where I(S;R=ri) is the mutual information, H(S) is the entropy of S, and H(S|R=ri) is the conditional entropy evaluated at a particular value of R=ri. S and R are variables representing source and receiver messages.

Dretske calls I(S;R=ri) the amount of information carried by a particular signal ri. He grounds the entire book on this concept, yet, this foundation nearly becomes irrelevant after he defines the information content of a signal: "A signal r carries the information that s is F" = P(s is F|r,k)=1.

Now Dretske turns to conditional probability for answers to deep philosophical questions. Yet philosophers and scientists are far from understanding the nature of probability itself, and it is not clear that a conditional probability of 1 says anything more than exactly that. You may say that P(X|Y)=1 means that Y carries information about X, but that interpretation adds nothing to our understanding--it simply defines a natural language sentence in terms of a probabilistic sentence. Philosophers looking to justify their work by connecting natural language concepts to math might find this impressive. Others will see it for what it is: using 'big words' or 'mathematical words' to sound smart.

Check out Shannon's original paper on 'information' theory online:
[...]
11 von 75 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Worst university press book I have ever read 25. Februar 2000
Von Brad McCormick - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I was required to read this book in grad school (I was embarrassed for the teacher, since the selection reflects on the selector). It is a genuinely awful book. The style was (for me, at least) indigestible. The main thesis of the book, that *meaning* -- as opposed to bit configurations -- can be *quantified* is not just nonsense, but *frightening* nonsense, since quantifying everything gets funded these days. The book is worth buying if you want to discover how appalling what Joseph Weizenbaum described in his fine book: "Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to calculation" can get!
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.