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Kirith Kirin (Englisch) Taschenbuch – Mai 2000


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 554 Seiten
  • Verlag: Meisha Merlin Pub (P) (Mai 2000)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1892065169
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892065162
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 3,2 x 14 x 21,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 528.972 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Nathan G. Tipton am 24. Juni 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
I want to start by saying that I've read just about everything Jim Grimsley has thus far written, so when I learned he was writing a strictly "genrefied" fantasy book, I was a bit curious (not to say skeptical). Like Grimsley (in his authorial comments above), I grew up reading Sci-Fi/Fantasy but more or less abandoned it for more "classic" (read: literary) fiction. This isn't to say I am denigrating genre fiction, as Jim has proved to me (via Kirith Kirin) that you can go home again.
Kirith Kirin is vintage Grimsley with a twist, and I hear echoes of his other works coursing through this novel. It's ostensibly the coming-of-age story of Jessex, a 14-year-old farmboy who is prophetically called to become the saviour of the mystical world of Aeryn Along the way, Jessex discovers he is especially adept at magic, of which he is taught by three ancient "sisters" known as the Diamysaar. He also discovers that he loves, and is loved in return by, the soon to be prophetically-decreed king, the eponymous Kirith Kirin. Typical of the genre, there are inevitable conflicts involving battling magicians, armies of quasi-humans (called Verm) engaging the forces of Kirith Kirin, and the like. Through it all, Grimsley's prose shines beautifully. There is as much imagistic influence from Dream Boy and Comfort and Joy (particularly the emphasis in Kirith Kirin on singing) as there is from Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and Samuel Delaney.
Having said this, there are of course caveats. Kirith Kirin is quite long (472 pages, plus glossaries and appendices) and sometimes tedious. The echt pedophiliac relationship between Jessex and Kirith Kirin (of which David Tedhams, in his June 2000 Lambda Book Report review, voiced concern) is utterly superfluous.
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 20. November 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
In his book "Kirith Kirin", Jim Grimsley tells the story of Jessex, a young farm boy who is taken by his uncle to the forest of Arthen to live at the Camp of the exiled king Kirith Kirin. But serving as an altar boy is only the first step towards his destiny, for he is to become the King's "Witch of the Wood", his strongest ally in the fight against the vicious magician Drudaen Keerfax. The story Grimsley tells is at once a new take on the genre's usual depiction of the fight between good and evil and the story of the love between two people in the face of great danger. Grimsley's magnificent talent as a story-teller and his beautiful prose make both stories a joy to read and have captivated me from page one. The account of the relationship between Jessex and the King is both tender and powerful and unlike anything I have read in this genre before. I truly hope that Jim Grimsley will return to the genre of fantasy to give us another vision like the one he created in "Kirith Kirin".
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2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von fpuck am 23. November 2003
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
schöne und flüssige geschichte. detaillierte welt, viele nette ideen ohne dabei in endlosserien zu verfallen. nicht zu kurz aber gut abgeschlossen. hinterlässt bei mir ein gefühl der zufriedenheit. meine zeit habe ich gerne damit verbracht.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 53 Rezensionen
60 von 67 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Strange departure 15. April 2001
Von Ivy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I must say I approached this one with both curiousity and trepidation; I've read most of Jim Grimsley's novels - Winter Birds, Comfort and Joy, Dream Boy - and found them well-written, engrossing, unusual, even masterful. But Kirith Kirin is a huge departure for Grimsley, who has crossed a line most authors won't: from 'literary' fiction to genre fiction, in this case fantasy. I wondered, starting the book, if he'd pull it off. Verdict? He stumbles in places, and Kirith Kirin is not up to the level of his other novels, but there's some good stuff in there. In short - it reads like a lot of the better first novels do, and as long as you can read it without dwelling on either its flaws or the fact that it *isn't* a first novel, it's quite enjoyable.
But let's go back to those flaws for a second. First on that list for me was the main romantic relationship in the book, between Jessex, the farmboy-turned-magician-turned-savior-of-the-world, and Kirith Kirin, the virtually immortal king. Jessex is *15* for most of the book. For me, the disparity in ages - thousands of years old v. 15 - was too great. Sure, Jessex was willing, but the relationship seemed to me to be coming too close to pederasty. And the rationalizations offered by Jessex, as the narrator, weren't really enough to make me comfortable. (I also found myself wondering why Kirith Kirin, who has lived for millenia, couldn't find the wisdom and self-control to keep his hands off Jessex long enough for him to start shaving.)
Another problem with the book is the length. It's 500 dense, closely printed, oversized pages. Now, I've read some great books of that length, books that needed and deserved to be that long, but Kirith Kirin isn't one of them. It begs for some judicious editing. In places, the excess verbiage drags the pace of the book down considerably - in particular, it seemed to me there were areas where Grimsley could've omitted his detailed descriptions - with things like travel itineraries, for example, and the many ordinary days the characters spend on horseback.
However, the book has some great strengths, too. Despite a rather standard-issue plot (one that shows Grimsley's familiarity with fantasy literature, I might add), there is some true inventiveness in Kirith Kirin. In particular, the magic system and magic use stood out as an order of magnitude above what most fantasy books have to offer; for once in my life, I read an entire book in the genre without hearing any echoes of the Dungeons & Dragons magic system.
Also, Grimsley displays his usual command of the language despite the padding effect. Even the excess prose is a pleasure to read, especially in a genre like fantasy, where the writing isn't always of a high order. He also takes the opportunity to do some additional explorations of his usual themes - isolation, for example - and images.
Overall, there's a lot more of Grimsley in this book than I had feared, and a lot less of the derivative stuff that fills a lot of fantasy novels. Although it did seem to me that the author hadn't quite settled into the genre, the book is very readable, and I expect that if Grimsley continues with the fantasy experiment, we should be seeing marvelous stuff in a book or two. So, in the final analysis: if you can give the author a bit of slack, you'll find a book that lives up to the genre, and in places goes beyond it.
25 von 26 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A memorable read 14. August 2000
Von Gauri Desai - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
When I first picked up this book, I expected it to be light, brainless reading. Certainly, the blurb on the back cover gives no insight as to the depth and emotion of the story. More than a conflict of immortal royals and their wizards, it is the story of a rise to power and a loss of innocence, the devastation of war and the end of an era.
The book is written in a first person narrative which allows the reader to experience the emotions of the main character as he develops his magical powers and discovers love in the form of his king, Kirith Kirin. Jessex's magical training is described in minute detail which caused the book to drag at times. On the other hand, the description of the circles of magic also led to an appreciation of the scope of Grimsley's imagination and attention to detail.
The love affair between Jessex and Kirith Kirin was poignant and touching. Although at first glance, their romance appears to border on pedophilia, it is clear to see that Jessex had reached adulthood not only by Aeryn's conventions but in maturity as well. Grimsley manages to describe their growing affection with dignity and without resorting to the type of melodrama prevalent in many other fantasy books.
Lastly there is the war itself and the conflict between Jessex and his enemy Wizard. The battles are described almost as an understatement. This only serves to make the destruction and the horror Jessex feels about this destruction more immediate.
I could go on forever writing praises of this book! But I think the best way to truly appreciate this book is to read it yourself and immerse yourself into the characters. With Grimsley's powerful writing, Jessex and his friends come to life and it is not so difficult to imagine world such as the one they live in. Grimsley is a master storyteller with an amazing sense of imagination. I hope that he will write more fantasy books in the future of this caliber.
25 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Beautifully written and superbly executed, if a bit overlong 24. Juni 2000
Von Nathan G. Tipton - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I want to start by saying that I've read just about everything Jim Grimsley has thus far written, so when I learned he was writing a strictly "genrefied" fantasy book, I was a bit curious (not to say skeptical). Like Grimsley (in his authorial comments above), I grew up reading Sci-Fi/Fantasy but more or less abandoned it for more "classic" (read: literary) fiction. This isn't to say I am denigrating genre fiction, as Jim has proved to me (via Kirith Kirin) that you can go home again.
Kirith Kirin is vintage Grimsley with a twist, and I hear echoes of his other works coursing through this novel. It's ostensibly the coming-of-age story of Jessex, a 14-year-old farmboy who is prophetically called to become the saviour of the mystical world of Aeryn Along the way, Jessex discovers he is especially adept at magic, of which he is taught by three ancient "sisters" known as the Diamysaar. He also discovers that he loves, and is loved in return by, the soon to be prophetically-decreed king, the eponymous Kirith Kirin. Typical of the genre, there are inevitable conflicts involving battling magicians, armies of quasi-humans (called Verm) engaging the forces of Kirith Kirin, and the like. Through it all, Grimsley's prose shines beautifully. There is as much imagistic influence from Dream Boy and Comfort and Joy (particularly the emphasis in Kirith Kirin on singing) as there is from Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and Samuel Delaney.
Having said this, there are of course caveats. Kirith Kirin is quite long (472 pages, plus glossaries and appendices) and sometimes tedious. The echt pedophiliac relationship between Jessex and Kirith Kirin (of which David Tedhams, in his June 2000 Lambda Book Report review, voiced concern) is utterly superfluous. Ironically Grimsley, perhaps showing his own Southern propriety, even apologizes (through Jessex) for "too much information" after their first erotic encounter.
This isn't Grimsley's first foray into sci-fi/fantasy (his short story in Nicola Griffith's anthology Bending the Landscape and his play Math and Aftermath are the most obvious predecessors) but it certainly is his longest and, perhaps, most ambitious. I'm a great fan of Jim's writing and would eagerly recommend any of his books, including Kirith Kirin. I would also be interested to see if he continues in this genre. Well done, Jim!
10 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A rare find in any genre 28. März 2001
Von "fayedit" - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I had no intention of liking this book. The cover is the worst sort of generic- dark horse riding through the woods-and the back cover blubage does little to convine anyone that there is anything interesting here. So why did I read it? Word of mouth from folks who never lie kept saying "you've got to read this". The plot is summarised in other postings so I won't repeat any of that. It's the writing itself I want to tell you about-if you are wondering should you pick it up-the answer is: only if you want something exquisite. I said to myself as I read it "I am not worthy. I haven't died and gone to reader's heaven with good lighting, huge cushy armchairs, and belgian chocololate yet. But here is an insider's view of magic and subtle states of trance, the regrets of living as an immortal, all the nuances of perception as an adolescent is trained as a magician. Move over T.H White!"
The word I want first to describe the writing is intelligent. By that I mean that as a reader I was never condescended to: I wasn't hit over the head with clunky expository lame dialogue. What a relief! Charachters that were fully imagined, not a stick figure sketched in anywhere. And no simplistic good wizard / bad wizard junk cluttering up the pages either.
This is writing that far exceeds what might be reasonably expected. It's a great novel that happens to have magicians in it. Brilliant, tender, insightful, filled with life. Damn I didn't want this book to end.
Read it and be seduced, dazzled, and end up buying copies for everyone you know. I was. I did. And I'm glad.
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
slow 22. Mai 2006
Von Furio - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
If only action packed sword and sorcery fantasy novels are to your taste you should carefully avoid the trouble to look for this out of print book which I happened to purchase for a rather outrageous price.

It is extremely slow paced, with longish descriptions of magic theory and magical duels and little action. We find here the coming of age story of young Jessex (the real main character), an anonimous adolescent peasant boy drawn into a civil war he hardly understands by a dim premonition of a long lived priest.

As it is always the case in any fantasy novel, Jessex turns out to be far more important than everybody expects.

He falls in love with his liege, gorgeous and long lived prince Kirith Kirin, learns magic and finally save his beloved, his kingdom and prevents an apocalypse.

Sensitive readers should not get alarmed: sex is mentioned but never graphically; Jessex is very young but his love for the centuries old prince is authentic and mature, a little more than it is to be believed of a teenager.

Mr Grimsley seems to be interested in creating a strange, melancholic, sensuos atmosphere; a world full of wrecked ghost cities populated by evanescent wraiths. The characters seem to partake in this misty setting, they seem to live a half life made much more by different shades of gray than by crude black and white. Even the main villain, though despicable, is only half alive. Much attention is given to the landscape instead: we get many (perhaps even too many) details and the land of Arthen seems to be the only character really alive.

The writing being fine I only feel like complaining about the overabundance of invented words: it looks like an alltoo easy device to create an exotic setting; we are given a full glossary at the end of the book, together with some appendices regarding various aspects of this fictitious world, but why hinder the reader with strange sounding names when a well chosen common word could have served just as well is something I have not come to explain.

At any rate this novel is beautiful and should not be out of print.
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