EUR 7,94
  • Statt: EUR 7,96
  • Sie sparen: EUR 0,02
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 4 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Kids at Work: Lewis Hine ... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,15 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 2 Bilder anzeigen

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 23. März 1998


Alle 7 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 7,94
EUR 6,15 EUR 4,93
16 neu ab EUR 6,15 5 gebraucht ab EUR 4,93

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor + Men at Work: 69 Classic Photographs: Photographic Studies of Modern Men and Machines
Preis für beide: EUR 21,15

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"In 1908 Lewis Hine left his teaching position for a full-time job as an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, then conducting a major campaign against the exploitation of children. Hine's photographs serve as a visual accompaniment to Freedman's narrative, which not only documents the abuses of the times but also traces the chronology of Hine's development as a crusader." Horn Book

"Readers will not only come to appreciate the impact of his groundbreaking work, but will also learn how one man dedicated and developed his skill and talents to bring about social reform." School Library Journal, Starred

Synopsis

Briefly traces the life of Lewis Hine, school teacher and photographer, and explains how he became involved in documenting child labor conditions.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Einleitungssatz
Manuel is five years old but big for his age. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
Mehr entdecken
Wortanzeiger
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.8 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
3
4 Sterne
1
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
Alle 4 Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

Von Ein Kunde am 13. Oktober 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
"Kids At Work" is a great book to tell and show the children of today how hard it was back then. Lewis Hine takes most of the credit. Thanks to his great photos The Declaration Of Dependence was passed. It stated that kids would be dependent and should live a normal kids life. Which concisted of going to school, being able to play freely with other kids ect.. We the children of today thank Lewis Hine for giving us a free life. I also give Ressell Freedman credit for following Mr. Hine and writing this spectacular and amizing book. As far as I am concerned Hine and Freedman greatest authors of all time!!
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Format: Taschenbuch
Every year when I take books to schools I always include this one. First, it shows today's children what their life may have been like if Hine and other courageous people hadn't worked to get child labor laws passed. I also like to introduce students to biographies of people who made a difference but were not big names like A. Lincoln and M. Jordan. Though the tone of the book is somber- and the faces in his photographs haunting. I always end on a "high" note- the courage of Hines to climb with a heavy load up to the top of the Empire State building as it was being built.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von triple J am 28. Dezember 2013
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
habe das buch für meine frau als geschenk gekauft,da sie sich mit "sozial schwachen" kindern und jugendlichen beschäftigt. doch mir hat das (auf den ersten blick) mindestens genauso gefallen wie ihr. es sind viele wirklich gute bis sehr gute fotografien dabei.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von Ein Kunde am 17. November 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
Children and adults are both intrigued by this wonderful photo documentation of the history of immigrant children working in the United States. Lewis Hine's pictures tell the story and Russell Freedman's words add a greater depth to this sometimes sad yet beautiful celebration of children at work during the early 20th century.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 27 Rezensionen
17 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The meaning of tough 4. März 2002
Von Alyssa A. Lappen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
...
This book weaves Hine's story together with his photographs of kids working in Maine's sardine canneries, Texas cotton fields, New York laundries, Tennessee and Georgia cotton mills and in textile mills all over the U.S. south. He took some of the most haunting photos of dark tunnels and grimy breaker rooms in Pennsylvania coalmines. He went inside glass factories, to farms, and onto city streets at 1 a.m. to photograph children distributing newspapers and 1 p.m. to watch them shining boots.
...
If your kids occasionally gripe that they have it tough, get them this book and show them what the word means. Alyssa A. Lappen
11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
an powerful book full of visual and written imagery 17. November 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Children and adults are both intrigued by this wonderful photo documentation of the history of immigrant children working in the United States. Lewis Hine's pictures tell the story and Russell Freedman's words add a greater depth to this sometimes sad yet beautiful celebration of children at work during the early 20th century.
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Convincing and exciting yet sad and true 13. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
"Kids At Work" is a great book to tell and show the children of today how hard it was back then. Lewis Hine takes most of the credit. Thanks to his great photos The Declaration Of Dependence was passed. It stated that kids would be dependent and should live a normal kids life. Which concisted of going to school, being able to play freely with other kids ect.. We the children of today thank Lewis Hine for giving us a free life. I also give Ressell Freedman credit for following Mr. Hine and writing this spectacular and amizing book. As far as I am concerned Hine and Freedman greatest authors of all time!!
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Kids at Work ~ a real eye-opener 25. August 2009
Von Mom Of Many Munchkins - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I found and bought this book at the Goodwill and thought it would be nice for looking at the photographs, since we like to look at real historical photos in our homeschool. Well, I decided to start reading the book and couldn't put it down. It didn't take long to finish it and I really enjoyed it. It was a real eye-opener. How interesting that Hines had to sneak around and often hide in order to get his photographs. He might tell a shop owner that he needed a photograph of a machine, but then asked the child worker to stand next to it so people could see the large size of the machine. Of course, he was really showcasing the child who had to run the machine. He knew exactly how many inches from the ground each button on his vest was, so a child could stand next to him and he could quickly tell how tall they were. When most of the photos in the book were taken, there were over 2 million American children younger than 16 who worked 12 or more hours a day, 6 days a week, for pitiful wages under unhealthy and hazardous conditions.

My youngest child is 5 and many of the photos were of children the same age, and younger, working in places like cotton fields or in spinner factories, many with bare feet. What a tragic life these children had, most not living very long. How would you like to work in a glass factory with the temperature in the building 100 - 130 degrees? The molten glass they worked with was 3,133 degrees! These glassblower assistants made about 65 cents a day; a pretty good wage back then. But, because it was so hazardous and unhealthy in the glass houses, these assistants usually didn't live past the age of 42 (I just turned 42 this year!).

How sad to see pictures of the breaker boys in the coal mines hunched over, all day long, picking the slate and stones from the coal. The foreman would hit them on their heads or shoulders with a broom handle if he thought they weren't working hard enough. If they fell into the coal chute, they would quickly be smothered to death. Do you think shucking oysters or peeling shrimp would be easier? The shrimp oozed an acid that would eat holes in leather shoes and tin pails, yet children had to handle these with their bare little fingers. 4-year old Mary could shuck two pails of oysters each day, making 10 cents. One mother and her 4 children worked in their tenement apartment making paper forget-me-not-flowers. All 5 of them sat working every day, all day long, working by the light of a kerosene lamp. The youngest, Angelica, was 3-years old and could make 540 flowers a day, earning her family 5 cents.

I think most children and adults today have no clue what life was really like for people back then; how hard they had to work for such little pay. I can't imagine my 5-year old doing what these kids were forced to do, let alone go without Nick Jr. for one day. I think this is an excellent book for children and adults to read and discuss. I plan on having my 14-year old read it this year for school. It's a book definitely worth reading and looking at.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
kids at work 4. Mai 2005
Von Elyse Palmer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This is a nonfiction photographic essay book that will touch any reader's heart. Mr. Freedman seems to know the facts and life of Mr. Hine very well. There is an extensive bibliography at the end of the book as wee. The information at the end seemed hard to believe but true. The book is only 11 years old so the facts aren't that dated. There are many saddening facts in this book. It reveals the truths about child labor in the text and photos.

The book was written to shine light on child labor history and to showcase some of Mr. Hine's photographs. The book is very interesting to read. There are quotes from some kids who worked in the factories and also some quotes from Mr. Hine who took great pride in accurately recording the facts about his subjects. This book could spark an interest in further study of this topic.

The information in this book is broken down and presented in an understandable order. The text is a harsh reality but it is presented well. The style gets the reader emotionally involved. The language is relatively simple and easy to read.

The information is laid out well and the references are listed in the back. There is a table of contents and bibliography and acknowledgement page.

The photos are a wonderful enhancement. The book would be nothing with out them. They are strategically placed and make the book what it is. There are captions that describe the pictures and they are discussed in the text.

This book could be used in the classroom to show what life was like and to talk about immigration and economic conditions.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.