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The Jewel of Seven Stars (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Bram Stoker
4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

The Jewel of Seven Stars is a horror novel by Bram Stoker.

An Egyptologist, attempting to raise from the dead the mummy of Tera, an ancient Egyptian queen, finds a fabulous gem and is stricken senseless by an unknown force. Amid bloody and eerie scenes, his daughter is possessed by Tera's soul, and her fate depends upon bringing Tera's mummified body to life.

Synopsis

This clear print title is set in Tieras 13pt font for easy reading

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 620 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 215 Seiten
  • Verlag: BookRix (1. Mai 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00KFDK7ZA
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

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Kundenrezensionen

4.2 von 5 Sternen
4.2 von 5 Sternen
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Mummy Dearest 23. Juli 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
"Hither the Gods come not at any summons. The Nameless One has insulted them and is forever alone. Go not nigh, lest their vengeance wither you away!"
There are certain story elements I can't resist: Egyptology is one of them. Throw in a mummy's curse and I can be convinced to do all sorts of reckless things--like buying SPHINX, that appalling movie with Lesley-Anne Down. Thus I came to read THE JEWEL OF SEVEN STARS even though it was written by Bram Stoker, the author of DRACULA (vampires being one of my least favorite story elements).
Originally published in 1903, JEWEL tells the story of barrister Malcolm Ross who is summoned in the dead of night by a mysterious letter from lovely Margaret Trelawny, the daughter of a famed Egyptologist. Mr. Trelawny has sunk into a trance-like state following an attack by an unknown assailant--the only clue, the lingering odor of "Nard and Circassia's balmy smells." Trelawny has left strict instructions that in the event of such an attack he is never to be left alone, and no one must remove the peculiar Egyptian bangle around his wrist.
Slowly, with dragging mummy footsteps, this horror classic journeys its restrained way to its inevitable climax. Though possibly a bit slow and bloodless for modern audiences, I think Stoker gets full marks. True, the characters are recognizable Edwardian stereotypes: the blushing, virginal heroine, the stalwart hero, the obsessed patriarch, etc. Nor is there much mystery as to where this is all leading. All the same, JEWEL is an entertaining read; the ideal choice for a muggy summer night. A number of scenes, like the discovery of the tomb in the cliffs and the story's final tragic zenith, remain in one's memory like the persistent scent of bitumen drifting in an open window...
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3.0 von 5 Sternen A must read for true fans 13. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This book starts very well, the middle is full of suspense, and the last scenes are griping, just the end leaves you wanting more. If you are a fan of Bram Stoker you'll really enjoy this, he frames the ere scenes so well you are suspicious of every- one and thing. I could choke on the air in the house where it takes place. I couldn't walk through the Egyptian exhibit at the museum without getting the creeps after reading this book. It does have some drawbacks, but is much better then Stokers "The Lair of the white Worm", because he doesn't rely on psychological symbolism to much. You'll definitely want to know what's going to happen next. The 1970's movie is not very good.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Second to Dracula 28. Mai 1999
Von C. Sahu
Format:Taschenbuch
None of Stoker's other works can match "Dracula," but this one is pretty darn good. Great atmosphere, and the plot's faults (a little cluttered and repetitive) can be seen as strengthening the presence of the house itself, shut up and cluttered with Egyptian relics as it is. The ending is equivocal, but, I thought, very satisfying -- I won't give anything away but I believe you have to think twice to understand what really happened, more like Henry James than typical Bram Stoker.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Beware the ending may have been tampered with. 19. August 2013
Von bernie
Format:Taschenbuch
An archeologist discovers the tomb of the Egyptian queen Tera. Looks like she left instructions on how to revive her. We speculate as to if he should or would follow the instructions. It is in a first-person narrative which leads you to think he survives to tell the story.

Sneaky people I went for the "free" kindle version of this story and everything was great and even though I could guess the ending (especially after watching Blood From the Mummy's Tomb") I was disappointed to find why it was free the 1912 ending was sweetness and light vs. the 1903 original; Chapter XVI "Powers - Old and New" was removed and the book was given a happier ending.

If you can over look this then free is o.k. but it should have had a disclaimer.

Found the real ending in "bramstoker.org". Still a tad curt.

If you did not know that his was written by Bram Stoker you could almost guess it was Sax Rohmer.

Why such a high rating? Because I found the telling of the story intriguing and it allows you to speculate.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  32 Rezensionen
19 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Stoker's best known post-Dracula novel 11. August 2003
Von Daniel Jolley - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Originally published in 1903, some six years after Dracula, Bram Stoker's The Jewel of Seven Stars is a singular work of dark fantasy. It reads as if it were one of the author's earliest writings, espousing a much more awkward style than that which permeates Stoker's most famous novel. The characters are stereotypical of the time, the dialogue is sometimes forced and so Victorian in its manner that it fails to draw the reader fully into the story, and it leaves too many unanswered questions in its wake. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this, Stoker's most familiar novel after Dracula, is its storyline built around the resurrection of an ancient Egyptian mummy. Few people today realize that Stoker not only truly defined the vampire genre, he helped give rise to the mummy genre as well. By far the most fascinating aspect of this tale is its ending, though, which I will discuss below.
The first several chapters of the novel call to my mind the host of whodunit films released in the 1940s and 1950s. Malcolm Ross, a barrister, is called to the home of Margaret Trelawney, a young lady he just recently met and took a fancy to, in the middle of the night. When he arrives at the home, he finds policemen, a doctor, Margaret, and the household staff in a great tizzy over an attack made upon Margaret's father. The man was found on the floor of his room, his left arm slashed in a number of places. The investigation begins, and a constant watch is held over the injured man, who has fallen into a cataleptic state. The next night, under the eyes of Ross, Margaret, and a nurse, a second baffling attack takes place by an unknown assailant. It soon becomes apparent that the person behind the attacks is attempting to gain access to the safe located in the room. Suspicions abound as both the police and the doctor are baffled by the situation. At this point, we begin to learn the history of the Egyptian relics housed in the Trelawney house and hear the story of the ancient Egyptian queen Tera and her apparent plans for reincarnating herself with the help of a beautiful jewel of seven stars, the very item housed in Trelawney's safe. The novel ends with a Great Experiment in which Tera's plans for a rebirth are carried out, the results of which fail to satisfy this reader.
Published in 1903, this novel is steeped in Victorian idealism, particularly in its treatment of Margaret and the courtship between her and Malcolm. Modern readers may find this aspect of the novel either romantic or silly. In addition, the respectful and entirely proper conversations between characters, especially in times of suspicion or fear, may seem strikingly quaint to today's readers. The second half of the novel, which tells the story of the ancient mummy and lays the groundwork for the climax of the Great Experiment, is much more interesting than the preceding pages, yet there are elements to the evolving story that fail to make perfect sense.
The Jewel of Seven Stars is unique in that it features two different endings, neither of which fully satisfies. The accepted version, which you will find in modern publications, is not the original ending but is instead a rewrite first found in the 1919 edition of the novel. It is anticlimactic at best and seems oddly different from the novel as a whole. There is actually some speculation that the final couple of pages of this ending were not even written by Stoker, who was dead and buried seven years prior to this amended edition's release. The original 1903 ending is a much better if rather shocking conclusion to a story that openly hints of ancient horrors; it is a pity that the original ending has been superseded by a questionable and quite dissatisfying rewrite. In any case, though, The Jewel of Seven Stars is an interesting if flawed novel that shows few signs of the literary magic with which Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, is infused.
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Mummy Dearest 23. Juli 2000
Von Drew Brainiard - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
"Hither the Gods come not at any summons. The Nameless One has insulted them and is forever alone. Go not nigh, lest their vengeance wither you away!"
There are certain story elements I can't resist: Egyptology is one of them. Throw in a mummy's curse and I can be convinced to do all sorts of reckless things--like buying SPHINX, that appalling movie with Lesley-Anne Down. Thus I came to read THE JEWEL OF SEVEN STARS even though it was written by Bram Stoker, the author of DRACULA (vampires being one of my least favorite story elements).
Originally published in 1903, JEWEL tells the story of barrister Malcolm Ross who is summoned in the dead of night by a mysterious letter from lovely Margaret Trelawny, the daughter of a famed Egyptologist. Mr. Trelawny has sunk into a trance-like state following an attack by an unknown assailant--the only clue, the lingering odor of "Nard and Circassia's balmy smells." Trelawny has left strict instructions that in the event of such an attack he is never to be left alone, and no one must remove the peculiar Egyptian bangle around his wrist.
Slowly, with dragging mummy footsteps, this horror classic journeys its restrained way to its inevitable climax. Though possibly a bit slow and bloodless for modern audiences, I think Stoker gets full marks. True, the characters are recognizable Edwardian stereotypes: the blushing, virginal heroine, the stalwart hero, the obsessed patriarch, etc. Nor is there much mystery as to where this is all leading. All the same, JEWEL is an entertaining read; the ideal choice for a muggy summer night. A number of scenes, like the discovery of the tomb in the cliffs and the story's final tragic zenith, remain in one's memory like the persistent scent of bitumen drifting in an open window...
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Greatly Underrated Book 23. Dezember 2005
Von Paul S. Mcalduff - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is great. I couldn't put it down. Personally I think that it is as good as "Dracula". It amazes me that it remains so obscure. One of the other reviewers complained of a weak ending. I assume that this poor person was unlucky enough to have read the 1912 edition. Stoker's publishers though that the original 1903 ending was too gruesome and made him rewrite it as a condition of re-publishing the book. I don't think anyone could describe the original ending as weak. If you like a good horror novel I highly recommend this book.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Worth the read 5. Februar 2002
Von Jeffrey Leeper - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
At the time of the novel's writing, the British Empire was still in place. Many artifacts from the outside were brought back to England. Many "gentlemen" were bringing their "discoveries" back for study. All things needed to be explained in terms of modern-day science. Is this Bram Stoker's response to this? Does he feel that some things are better left alone?
This story was published in 1904 (seven years after "Dracula"). Unlike its well-known predecessor, this novel was not written in the journal format that does take an edge off of the pace. This story is told from the perspective of a barrister, Malcolm Ross. He is brought into the events by Margaret Trelawny after meeting her days before.
Egyptology, a common passion at this time in British history, is at the heart of the novel. Margaret's father, Mr. Trelawny, is an Egyptologist who has made a major discovery of a powerful woman who lived over 14 centuries previous. The story of the find is told late in the novel by him in retrospect. More than the first half of the novel is setting the stage of the mystery and of the telling of the find. Like today's parodies of teen horror, you would think the characters would realize that it is time to leave.
The climax of the novel is over in a couple of pages at the end. I felt a little bewildered. Even "Dracula" has a bit of a post script explaining what happens afterward.
I would recommend this book for Stoker fans and horror fans. This book is stronger when you reflect on what his readers would be familiar with in the early 1900s.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Beware the ending may have been tampered with. 21. April 2013
Von bernie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
An archeologist discovers the tomb of the Egyptian queen Tera. Looks like she left instructions on how to revive her. We speculate as to if he should or would follow the instructions. It is in a first-person narrative which leads you to think he survives to tell the story.

Sneaky people I went for the "free" kindle version of this story and everything was great and even though I could guess the ending (especially after watching Blood From the Mummy's Tomb") I was disappointed to find why it was free the 1912 ending was sweetness and light vs. the 1903 original; Chapter XVI "Powers - Old and New" was removed and the book was given a happier ending.

If you can over look this then free is o.k. but it should have had a disclaimer.

Found the real ending in "bramstoker.org". Still a tad curt.

If you did not know that his was written by Bram Stoker you could almost guess it was Sax Rohmer.

Why such a high rating? Because I found the telling of the story intriguing and it allows you to speculate.
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