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The Java Developers Almanac 2000 (Java (Addison-Wesley)) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – Juli 2000


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Taschenbuch, Juli 2000
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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 1072 Seiten
  • Verlag: Addison-Wesley Longman, Amsterdam; Auflage: 3rd (Juli 2000)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0201432994
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201432992
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 18,6 x 5 x 23,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (19 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 2.346.530 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

While Java started out simply enough with relatively few objects and APIs, today's Java 2, Standard Edition (J2SE), bundles over 2,100 classes. The Java Developers Almanac provides a truly valuable reference to nearly all the classes and APIs in standard Java. This "white pages" for Java puts all classes and APIs at your fingertips, along with short samples that illustrate essential programming tasks.

It's a compliment to say that this title resembles a telephone book. With over 1,000 pages (and printed on similar paper stock), The Java Developers Almanac, like a phone book, is organized alphabetically. Early sections look at Java 2 classes by package, such as graphics (including Java 2D), file I/O, network programming, and AWT and Swing. Early sections include several hundred short code excerpts, which provide key programming solutions.

The heart of this text is an A-to-Z compendium of over 2,100 Java classes, and a whopping 24,000 methods and properties. Readers get a listing of what's in each class, along with prototype and arguments. As an "almanac," the book contains no room for explaining what each method does--by using a clever set of symbols, however, each listing provides the details of each method (such as which ones are "final," "static," and the like), plus the version of Java in which each method first appeared (JDK 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3). These reference sections set a new standard of clarity for documenting classes. (Method and property names are aligned in the middle of the page, regardless of return type; a typographic convention that makes it easy to find what you need quickly.)

Later sections provide useful references that list the changes from Java 1.0 through 1.3, as well as PersonalJava, the Java Native Interface (JNI), plus some of the details of the Java Virtual Machine (with a listing of byte codes). An innovative index cross-references all methods and classes (including where objects are used as parameters and return values). Truly encyclopedic and remarkably well organized, this book is a virtual must-have for any serious Java developer. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Comprehensive reference to Java 2, Standard Edition (J2SE) packages, classes and APIs (including 2,100 classes and 24,000 methods), sample code for common programming tasks, working with graphics and images (including Java 2D), playing audio and MIDI files, Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) and Swing components, JDBC database basics, directory programming with JNDI/LDAP, file system and file I/O, using the Java reflection APIs, basic socket, URL and networking in Java; RMI working with Strings, arrays and collections; Unicode, locale and internationalization support; documented changes in JDK 1.0 through JDK 1.3, the Java Native Interface (JNI), classes included in PersonalJava, and Java Virtual Machine (JVM) byte codes.

Synopsis

Thousands of expert Java developers rely on The JavaaA A Developers Almanac series for the fast answers they need to save time -- and the authoritative guidance they need to build great Java applications. The latest book in the series, The JavaaA A Developers Almanac 2000, offers up-to-the-minute, thorough quick-reference information for four major versions of the core JavaaA A Class Libraries: JDKs 1.0/1.1 and J2SE versions 1.2 and 1.3! The latest edition covers 2,100 classes and 24,000 members, all formatted, organized, and cross-referenced for easy lookup! It includes complete member listings of every class; detailed analyses of API changes for each release, coverage of the Java virtual machine, JNI, PersonalJava TM, and 300+ "examplets TM" succinctly demonstrating each package's key operations. Also available: The JavaaA A Class Libraries Poster, 5/E. Covering the JavaaA A 2 Platfor, Standard Edition v1.3. Chan/Lee 0-201-43297-8, $9.95x.

Kundenrezensionen

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 18. Januar 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
This is an almanac; and, true to its name, it packs a LOT of information into a SMALL package. Thorough and yet concise, it has the highest content-to-page ratio of any programming reference I have seen. The Java classes are big and the _Java Developers Almanac_ is the tool to use to quickly find the details needed to get programs running. It is a great help for rapid prototyping in new application areas, and to fine-tune and polish the finished product. The "traditional" class documentation found in other reference books can be tiring, frustrating and time consuming to use because it usually only describes what is new to a class, leaving it to the reader to flip around to chase up the inheritance tree to see everything. The "Almanac" tells everything for every class. While this may be a redundant use of paper and ink, it is a great time saver to the programmer trying to use a new class.
This is not a book to learn Java or object oriented programming. This is an excellent reference for the experienced object oriented programmer.
The _Java Developers Almanac_ is a "must have" reference for contractors and "road warrior" programmers who only have a briefcase for an office.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Reference books follow an odd evolutionary path. The most successful reference books strive for heft - the bigger the better - often approaching prehistoric proportions. But sooner or later there comes a book that defies tradition and manages to be complete without breaking your desk, or your wallet. Patrick Chan's "Java Developer's Almanac" is that book.
The first thing you'll notice about this book is the convenient form factor. This is 5.5"x8" book is small enough to carry comfortably and lays flat next to a keyboard without taking up the entire desk, but it is not so small that the print becomes indecipherable. It is truly printed in the style of an almanac - the same paper, the same form factor. That would be enough to make me buy it even if it didn't contain some great stuff inside.
For the most part the book contains prototype declarations for every public and protected member of every Java class, all 18,837 of them. How do I know there are that many? Because one of the most interesting sections consists of statistics gathered from every Java release since 1.0. In addition the book contains detailed listings of what has changed - omissions and additions - between every Java release, including PersonalJava. Seeing the definitive list of changes from one version to another was fascinating (although it shows what a shambles the compatibility story is.) Nonetheless this book manages to capture the vary latest changes up to Java 1.2b3. It is just staggering to consider that there has been an order-of-magnitude growth in the number of methods since Java1.0!!! That's why I need this book.
The prototypes are organized alphabetically by class making it easy to find just what you are looking for.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von "shaghab" am 31. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Well there is so much material in this book. WOW! buy it asap if you are looking for some good java reference book. Almost nothing is missed out in this book. Plus points the book is reader friendly and is also up to date. You need this book even if you are only occasional java programmer. BUY IT.
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Format: Taschenbuch
Given the large size of the current class libraries in Java, the quality of your references is now more critical than ever. In my work as a technical editor of Java books, I have found this book invaluable. The content consists almost entirely of the class names, what they are derived from and the interfaces. The remainder is a collection of "examplets", small snippets of code that show how some of the methods are used. Alphabetized based on the class names, it is adequate when your only interest is in the name of a class or the characteristics of a method. Of course, it is only my first avenue, for more detailed information it is necessary to consult another resource. However, in many of those instances, consulting this book first saved time in examining the other documentation. Covering versions, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 of the JDK, this is one shelf reference that you should not be without. I listed it as one of the best books of the year in my On Books column that appeared in the September,1999 issue of Journal of Object-Oriented Programming.
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Back in 1995, when I first started programming with Java.. everyone kept on saying 'Nutshell, Nutshell, Nutshell'.. I refused to listen.
Well.. Mike Afergan provided a much better book (as a desktop reference) called 'Java Quick Reference' (ISBN 078970868X). Good work Mike! :) It left my mates for dead when I showed them a 'better' solution - as a desktop reference.
The 'Java Almanac' is a great companion to the 'Java Class Libraries, Second Edition' series (ISBN 0201310023 and ISBN 0201310031). I feel it is a must for anyone who is serious in developing with Java as it outlines clearly the differences between 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 - compatibility between these is a huge mess!
IT IS ONLY A REFERENCE BOOK!
If you wish to learn Java.. this is not the book for you.. it is for experienced Java people only. However, if you are get the three books listed, you have enough to get started and develop some serious applications.
/az
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