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Invictus: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation
 
 

Invictus: Nelson Mandela and the Game That Made a Nation [Kindle Edition]

John Carlin
4.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 5,46 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 5,46  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 21,41  
Taschenbuch EUR 7,43  
Audio CD, Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 20,38  


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"* 'Wonderful... Don't wait for the movie.' - New York Times * 'A triumphant conversion... A portrait of South Africa's answer to George Washington... [It] works because Carlin got so close to Mandela and the people Mandela seduced.' - Simon Kuper, Financial Times * 'Revelatory... A tight, gripping and powerful book that shines a light on a moment of hope, not just for one nation but the whole world.' - Daily Express * 'A fascinating story... Thirteen years on, it is possible to look back with emotion at a moment which suggested that everything was possible.' - Justin Cartwright, Sunday Telegraph"

Kurzbeschreibung

As the day of the final of the 1995 Rugby World Cup dawned, and the Springboks faced New Zealand's all-conquering All Blacks, more was at stake than a sporting trophy. When Nelson Mandela appeared wearing a Springboks jersey and led the all-white Afrikaner-dominated team in singing South Africa's new national anthem, he conquered the hearts of white South Africa.

Invictus tells the extraordinary human story of how that moment became possible. It shows how a sport, once the preserve of South Africa's Afrikaans-speaking minority, came to unify the new rainbow nation, and tells of how - just occasionally - something as simple as a game can help people to rise above themselves and see beyond their differences.


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4.8 von 5 Sternen
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Forging a National Consciousness through Mutual Respect 29. September 2008
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Playing the Enemy is a very timely book. In these days when nations are often more divided than before, Nelson Mandela's instinct to show respect, friendliness, and common purpose with those who saw him as an enemy is a beacon that lights up the potential for all people to come together to accomplish more. John Carlin has used the Rugby World Cup imaginatively to illustrate the essence of President Mandela's approach. Mr. Carlin is a wonderful story teller, and you'll feel chills as you read the many great moments he brilliantly captures in Playing the Enemy.

Leaders have always used foreign enemies to bring their purpose together. Who realized that this could be done at the level of sport rather than through war as a way to unify a country where people were deeply suspicious (even paranoid) about one another?

I was glad to see that Mr. Carlin provided lots of background about how someone imprisoned for decades became the leader of a reconstituted nation in South Africa and went on to accomplish things that not even the most optimistic would have expected. President Mandela's story is one for the ages, and this way of telling the story makes it easier to understand for those who never saw South Africa during the Apartheid regime.

Although I had long studied and worked to help change the government in South Africa from the inside and outside, the political impact of the international boycott of the South African rugby team had been lost to me. I hope those who would like to encourage governments to behave more appropriately towards their people will remember this example.

Bravo, Mr. Carlin!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen Forging a National Consciousness through Mutual Respect 29. September 2008
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Taschenbuch
Playing the Enemy is a very timely book. In these days when nations are often more divided than before, Nelson Mandela's instinct to show respect, friendliness, and common purpose with those who saw him as an enemy is a beacon that lights up the potential for all people to come together to accomplish more. John Carlin has used the Rugby World Cup imaginatively to illustrate the essence of President Mandela's approach. Mr. Carlin is a wonderful story teller, and you'll feel chills as you read the many great moments he brilliantly captures in Playing the Enemy.

Leaders have always used foreign enemies to bring their purpose together. Who realized that this could be done at the level of sport rather than through war as a way to unify a country where people were deeply suspicious (even paranoid) about one another?

I was glad to see that Mr. Carlin provided lots of background about how someone imprisoned for decades became the leader of a reconstituted nation in South Africa and went on to accomplish things that not even the most optimistic would have expected. President Mandela's story is one for the ages, and this way of telling the story makes it easier to understand for those who never saw South Africa during the Apartheid regime.

Although I had long studied and worked to help change the government in South Africa from the inside and outside, the political impact of the international boycott of the South African rugby team had been lost to me. I hope those who would like to encourage governments to behave more appropriately towards their people will remember this example.

Bravo, Mr. Carlin!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen grossartig 27. September 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Inspirierend für alle, die nach menschlichen und politischen Vorbildern suchen. Gerade in unseren heutigen, 'abgekochten ' Zeiten zeigt der Autor auf mitreissende Weise auf, wie unglaubliches wahr werden kann.Mandela sagte mal 'it's impossible only until somebody does it.'unbedingt empfehlenswert.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Wesentlich besser als der Film 17. Februar 2012
Von Phil
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Invictus ist eine packende Geschichte über Südafrikas Entwicklung von Arpartheid zum heutigen Stand. Es ist sehr politisch und anders als der darauf basierende Film befasst es sich nicht nur mit dem Rugby World Cup und dem offiziellen Ende der Apartheid, sondern gibt einen Einblick in das Gesammtbild.
Ich habe das Buch gelesen bevor ich den Film gesehen habe und war, im Gegensatz zu meinen Freunden, die das Buch nicht kennen, sehr enttäuscht da etwa die ersten 60% komplett fehlen.
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Amazon.com: 4.8 von 5 Sternen  96 Rezensionen
87 von 92 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A book about rugby? Don't be fooled. This is so much more... 3. September 2008
Von Jesse Kornbluth - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
If you read nothing else this year, get your hands on "Playing the Enemy" and read pages 201 to 253.

It won't take long.

By the time Nelson Mandela walks into that stadium, your heart will be pounding. By the time he walks into the Springboks locker, you'll be in tears. And you'll cry pretty much straight through to the end.

All because, on June 24, 1995, the South African Rugby team beat New Zealand to win the Rugby World Cup.

If you're like most Americans, you know that Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in prison --- 18 of them in a tiny cell on Robben Island --- and emerged without hatred to spearhead a peaceful transfer of power in South Africa. But you probably know nothing about the 1995 Rugby World Cup match. John Carlin's brilliant book corrects that, and, along the way, presents a concise biography of a remarkable man.

In these pages, Nelson Mandela is a brilliant politician with a genius for disarming his enemies. To Mandela, everyone is human, everyone can be reached. The only question is how. In prison, he would introduce his lawyer to his "guard of honor" --- and his jailers would find themselves shaking hands with an attorney they loathed. And he used his dead time in prison to teach himself Afrikaans, read the Afrikaans newspapers and familiarize himself with Afrikaner history.

Rugby is the favorite sport of Afrikaners, the dominant white tribe in South Africa --- "apartheid's master race." All but one of the 15 players on the Springbok team were white. In a stadium that held 62,000, 95% of the crowd would be white. No wonder that blacks saw the Boks as a symbol of oppression.

"Don't address their brains," Mandela believed. "Address their hearts." One direct way to do that was through sports. People love their teams; the connection is purely emotional. If the Springboks could come to engage both blacks and whites, that might end the sense among blacks that sports in South Africa was "apartheid in tracksuits" --- and might make whites more accepting of blacks as equals.

Mandela did not just lay out a goal. He met and charmed the white lords of rugby, then lobbied for the World Cup to be played in South Africa. He invited François Pienaar, the Springboks captain, to visit him and encouraged him to see his sport as "nation building". Soon the team was learning how to sing "Nkosi Sikele", the black national anthem. And, because a storybook fantasy was becoming reality, the Springboks advanced steadily to the World Cup finals.

The pages that are your homework begin on the morning of the championship game. One of Mandela's bodyguards got an idea: Mandela should enter the stadium wearing a green-and-gold Springbok jersey. Mandela improved on the idea --- his jersey, he said, should have Pienaar's number on it.

Across town, the players had been staying at a hotel. To calm their nerves, they went out for an early morning jog. As they left, Pienaar recalled, "Four little black kids selling newspapers recognized us and chased after us and started calling out our names --- they knew almost everyone on that team --- and the hairs on my neck stood on end... It was the moment when I saw, more clearly than ever before, that this was far bigger than anything we could ever have imagined."

Five minutes before kickoff, Nelson Mandela walked onto the field to greet the players. To the Springbok jersey, he had added a Springbok hat. "When they caught sight of him," Carlin writes, "the crowd seemed to go dead still." And then the chant --- from the almost all-white crowd --- began: "Nel-son! Nel-son! Nel-son!"

I'm going to leave it there, so as not to spoil the magic of the next pages for you. Just know that what happened in that stadium that afternoon was a crazy quilt of glory: atonement, forgiveness, liberation and celebration. It's the kind of event that happens when people who have known only hatred and fear drop the burden of history and move past their differences. Winning a game? That day South Africa climbed a mountain.

It is a measure of the quality of this story that Morgan Freeman is producing a film based on the book --- and playing Nelson Mandela. Matt Damon will be Pienaar, the South African rugby captain. And Clint Eastwood is slated to direct.

I guarantee you: Audiences will cheer. And weep. And these will be tears of joy, because --- for once --- a national leader had perfect pitch, and all of his countrymen knew it, and they all got it right.

In other countries, even in our own, skeptics doubt that this kind of brotherhood can be engineered. It can be. It was.
15 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Simply stated-"A Must Read!!!" 9. Januar 2010
Von L. Lawlor - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
A powerfully moving account of the impact of perhaps one of the most incredibly haumane and politically gifted individuals of all time, Nelson Mandella. (In reading this one cannot help but think of Ghandi.) The story of the transformation of South Africa, as put forth by this gifted author, John Carlin, is mesmerizing. Hard to put down. We are introduced to an array of individuals, on both sides of the predgeudicial conflict. The descriptions of the personalities involved are vivid and individualized in a most comprehensive manner. You develop a true feel for the ingrained vitriol of each. To witness the transcendant changes that these people went through is at once exceptionally emotional, and at the same time heart rendering. Well written. You are there involved in the excitement of the moment. The significance of a single sporting event, the world cup rugby competition in 1995, held in South Africa, and its impact on bringing the two cultures together, is absolutely fascinating. A most enjoyable adventure to read this book. Of course I am definitely looking forward to seeing the movie, but doubt that it could be as good as this book. Hope a lot of people read it.
18 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Inspirational and a Reminder How Great Leaders can Change the World 4. Dezember 2009
Von John G. Jazwiec - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
I read this book over a year ago. I was pleasantly surprised to see it made into a movie. The book was well rated by the NY Times but it was hardly a best seller. I spent my time reading this book, marveling at Mandela from lawyer, to a prisoner who charmed his captors, negotiated with the government in secret, always without malice and never lost his dignity through it all. That was inspiring, but more so was how he brought together his country using the a World Cup Rugby Match. You are not human if you dont find yourself crying at what he accomplished. Mandela never had a lust for power, he ran the country and then retired. He never used his incarcertion to get back against people. Having Morgan Freeman playing him (the voice of God) is a particularly strong metaphor and remind us that leaders like Mandela come once in a generation.
15 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Forgivness in overtime. 9. November 2009
Von Sara Shwartz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Awe inspiring. Carlin gives enough back history of South Africa and the poltical tension that preceeded the 1995 World Cup Rugby game to make you want to stand up and cheer at the end of the book.
11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Inspirational! 2. Juli 2010
Von aquarius - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
As a simple story about an underdog national rugby team beating all odds to win a championship, this would be a very good story. What makes this story great, is that team has been chosen (by newly elected South African president Nelson Mandela) as a way to unite a South Africa torn by divisions caused by decades of government enforced segregation of blacks and pave the way for reconciliation between bitter enemies. Can the Springboks, a symbol of the old segregated government, truly make their motto "One Team, One Country" come true?

If you have watched "Invictus" be assured that this book has much more of the background to the people and events portrayed by the movie. The added detail gives one a sharper understanding of many of the principle characters in the movie and the true scope of Mandela's brilliance.

Highly recommended!
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