Fashion Sale Öle & Betriebsstoffe für Ihr Auto Strandspielzeug calendarGirl Prime Photos Sony Learn More Bauknecht Kühl-Gefrier-Kombination A+++ Hier klicken Fire Shop Kindle PrimeMusic Lego Summer Sale 16

Kundenrezensionen

4,1 von 5 Sternen28
4,1 von 5 Sternen
Ihre Bewertung(Löschen)Ihre Bewertung


Derzeit tritt ein Problem beim Filtern der Rezensionen auf. Bitte versuchen Sie es später noch einmal.

am 1. Februar 2006
That is the question. Of course, when one thinks of Victoria, the idea of prudishness, conservatism, and a very reserved manner in action and morality naturally come to mind. It was never unusual for monarchs, male or female, to have lovers outside of their marriages (indeed, it might be considered unusual for a monarch to have been thought to have remained faithful), but Victoria? The epitome of a repressive, almost oppresive morality? Surely not.
Don't be so sure.
Four years after the death of Prince Albert, to whom Victoria was completely devoted, and for whom she mourned in quite public and dramatic fashion, against the protests of her children and her ministers, John Brown, a favourite ghillie of the royal couple, was brought back into service of the Queen household.
Victoria's favouritism toward him, coupled with his own brash and blunt behaviour, caused him to be envied and disliked by members of her family, her household service, her ministers, and largely by the public. There were parodies of John Brown's activities, done up in the form of mock Court Circulars (the official listing of royal engagements), which appeared in the press on both sides of the Atlantic.
It is unknown if Brown actually kept a diary (the movie speculates such, but also states that no diary was ever found). There was a large black trunk of correspondence found after Victoria's death, between the Queen and her doctor at the time, Profeit, regarding John Brown. This came into the possession of her new doctor, Reid, who recorded 'most compromising' secrets into his green memorandum book. Alas, this book was burned by Reid's son, and the trunk was not found. Did it refer to a secret marriage between Victoria and John Brown, as was often speculated?
This is, in truth, unlikely -- Victoria's devotion to Albert never waned in her life, and there was a certain innocence, lack of pretense and guile in Victoria that the more political and suspicious (particularly in the press) would not have known. Both Brown and Victoria were outraged at the rumours. Brown was a servant who put no stock in class divisions and the artificiality of social conventions -- his familiarity with the Queen (in fact no different from his direct and familiar manner of relating to everyone) was simply his manner.
But then, everyone likes a good, juicy scandal, don't they? So much more interesting than decades of mourning, which makes for rather boring news leaders.
The film takes up the story with Brown's arrival at the royal residence on the Isle of Wight (an inaccuracy, as he was presented at Windsor first). The story is romantic yet reserved, and the cinematography is stunning. From the cloud-cast home on the Isle of Wight to the stately and foreboding Windsor scenes, to the unspoiled Highlands around Balmoral, this film has had great care infused in the details of costume, setting, and atmosphere.
Judi Dench gives perhaps the greatest performance of her life as the Queen, showing real emotion through the Victorian reserve in an admirable fashion (for which she was nominated for the Academy Award, and won the Golden Globe, as best actress). In a really surprising casting, Billy Connolly, best known as a comic, turns in a first class performance as John Brown, the brash Scotsman who becomes completely devoted to his Queen. Geoffrey Palmer, a solid actor known in many BBC productions, plays the Queen's private secretary, Sir Henry Ponsonby, who is continually amazed at the liberties taken by Brown (Ponsonby, in reality, saw Brown as a first class servant, and remarked so frequently in correspondence with others). This film was first proposed as a BBC television production, but ended up being so well performed and executed that it was transferred to become a cinematic release.
Given the high profile scandals of the royal family today, this story seems almost timid. But, history does repeat itself, so one can never be entirely sure, until such time as the royal archives are opened to scholars, perhaps a few centuries from now, and the truth may be known to posterity.
0Kommentar|14 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 12. Mai 2006
Gratulation! Ein gelungenes Stück Filmgeschichte. Hier wird die Historie auf ganz neue Weise dargestellt. Es ist nicht einfach nur die Lebensgeschichte einer unnachahmlichen Queen, es ist ein kleiner Einblick in die Welt der damaligen Zeit. Mit all seinen Facetten aus Intrigen, Sehnsüchten und der Gefühlskälte die ein solcher „Posten" mit sich bringt.

Die Besetzung ist durch die Bank hervorragend. Dame Judi Dench ist geradezu prädestiniert für die Rolle der Queen Victoria, jeder Blick eine Offenbarung der Schauspielkunst. Dazu der männliche Gegenpart in Gestalt von Billy Connolly als schottischer Diener John Brown, der durch seine, dezent ausgedrückt, ungewöhnliche Vorgehensweise sowohl das Vertrauen, als auch die Freundschaft dieser ganz besonderen Frau zu gewinnen vermag.

Ganz zu schweigen von dem kleinen Bonbon das ein damals noch unbekannter Gerard Butler, in der Rolle von Mr. Browns Bruder, auf herrlich schottische Weise sein Quentchen dazu beiträgt das dieser Film ein wunderbares Erlebnis wird. Ein Tip, wenn dieser Mann zu sprechen anfängt, umschalten auf Originalton. Der Slang ist unübertrefflich und erst mit dem schottischen Dialekt versteht man die seltsam liebenswert verschrobene Mimik Gerard Butlers. Göttlich!

Dazu die Landschaftsbilder Schottlands, die allein für sich ein Erlebnis darstellen das man wohl so schnell nicht wieder vergißt. Wer schon einmal seinen Fuß auf schottischen Boden gesetzt hat, wird unwillkürlich den würzigen Duft wahrzunehmen glauben, der für dieses rauhe Land so typisch ist.

Ein unvergleichliches Erlebnis in diesen Film einzutauchen und die Welt um sich herum zu vergessen.
22 Kommentare|49 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 18. März 2001
1861, nach dem Tod ihres geliebten Gatten Albert stürzt die britische Königin Victoria in tiefe Depressionen, und wird für die nächsten zehn Jahre Schwarz tragen. Die glühenden Verehrer der Monarchie sehen diese in Gefahr, und holen den Rittmeister John Brown an den Hof, um die Königin aufzuheitern. Doch aus der anfänglichen Distance entwickelt sich langsam eine leidenschaftliche Liebe, die nicht sein darf... Basierend auf realen Fakten schuf der britische Regisseur John Madden eine ergeifende Parabel auf Macht und Liebe. Ein paar Jahre später sollte er großen Erfolg mit seiner Interperation von Shakespeares Leben SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE haben. Leider ging dieser feinfühlige und traumhaft besetzte Film unter. Dame Judi Dench, eine meiner absoluten Lieblingsschauspielerin, ist superb in ihrer Rolle, sie geht richtig auf, und spielt alle anderen an die Wand. Ebenfalls gefallen hat mir John Connolly als Rittmeister John Brown und Anthony Shear als intriganter Außenminister. Ein gelungener Film, der sich ab und an etwas hinzieht, aber zeigt, das sich die Monarchie in den letzten hundert Jahren nicht grundlegend verändert hat. Eine eindeutige Empfehlung!
0Kommentar|15 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 2. Juni 2008
My picture of Queen Victoria was very much that of a an small, old lady, quite fat, her hands covered in rings, of course dressed all in black with a white lace veil and always in mourning her husband, tyrannising her family and government and nevertheless the longest reigning and most imposing monarch ever to sit on Britain's throne. Every actress who embarks on the enterprise to play the role of Queen Victoria will have to deal with the general public's perception of the Queen and at the same time show us "the real Victoria". Dame Judy Dench manages this in this excellent movie.
The film takes us into the 1860s, as Victoria was inconsolable after the death of her beloved husband, ahs retired from the world. She sends for her late husband favourite gillie, Mr. Brown who mange to bring her back to the world of the living. These unusual platonic friendship between the mighty Queen of the British Empire and a mere Scottish servant shows us that Queen Victoria was a woman who needed to be taken care of, needed a man at her side she could entirely trust and a shoulder to lean on. The movie shows us that she was an emotional fragile person and at the same time a female monarch who in a male dominated society manage to hold everybody in awe. By taking a Scottish gillie as her trusted friend, she defied all conventions...in the Victorian area which seems to me all convention... Maybe Queen Victoria was perhaps less conventional than public perception makes her out? The story is very touching and one understands more about this side of the "old Queen" as through any biography.

The actors are superb - Dame Judi Dench should have earned Oscar for her spot-on portrayal of the troubled Queen Victoria. She got it only two years later for her repeat, but not as impressive royal performances as Queen Elizabeth in two 1999 films.

I am sure that you will enjoy this film!! Not one single moment of boredom, a well told story and excellent acting.
0Kommentar|5 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 23. März 2005
Ein Film der etwas leiseren Töne, wunderschön, auch beim 20. Ansehen. Ursprünglich nur wegen Gerard Butler gekauft (ja, auch seine Nacktszene rechtfertigt den Kauf), überzeugten mich auch die wunderbare Judy Dench und der großartige Billy connely einmal mehr. Ich empfehle, den Film in Originalversion anzusehen, da bei den deutschen Synchronisationen leider auf die Dialekte und Akzente nie Wert gelegt wird, was mehr als schade ist.
0Kommentar|29 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 25. Februar 2005
Ein Film, wie ich ihn mag.
Königin Victoria, vier Jahre nach dem Tod ihres geliebten Gatten, immer noch in Trauer gefangen, wird durch den schottischen Oberstallmeister Brown durch seine ruppige, aber trotzdem umwerfend charmanten Art aus ihrer Lethargie gerissen.
Dieser Film, der auf Tatsachen basiert, spiegelt eine interessante Zeitspanne aus der Regierungszeit Queen Victorias wieder und wie schon damals gegen Intrigen jeglicher Art gekämpft werden musste.
Die Schauspieler, allen voran Billy Connolly als Urschotte mit traumhaftem Zungenschlag (unbedingt mit OmU anschauen) leisten wirklich hervorragende Arbeit. Auch Judy Dench, die der Königin zwar äusserlich nicht besonders ähnlich sieht - soweit man das mit den Bildern von damals überhaupt vergleichen kann - spielt die Königin mit einer Mischung aus Herrschsucht und Verletzbarkeit.
Als kleines Goodie für alle Gerald Butler-Fans: Ja, der Mann spielt mit und ... was noch viel besser ist: Für einen kleinen aber feinen Moment sieht man ihn von hinten, ganz ohne irgendwelche Kleidung am Leib - ein höchst erfreulicher Anblick.
11 Kommentar|21 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 21. September 2007
Solch ein wunderschöner Film kann ja nur aus GB kommen.
Im Zweifelsfall greife ich immer gerne nach einem Englischen Film, da ist der Enttäuschungsfaktor geringer.

Dieser hier ist meiner unmaßgeblichen Meinung nach ein Juwel was Ausstattung, Schauspieler Kamera und Regie betrifft. Ich war bezaubert von dieser schönen Liebesgeschichte. Meiner Meinung nach hat sie....!
Mein Mann sieht sich solche Filme natürlich nicht an! Macht nix!
Wenn ich es sage! Mir erschien der Film viel zu kurz! Seufz!!!
0Kommentar|4 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
TOP 1000 REZENSENTam 17. September 2011
Der Film beschreibt die im Kern reale Beziehung der frisch verwitweten Queen Victoria mit ihrem männlichen Diener und zunehmend Vertrauten, dem Schotten John Brown. Der Schwerpunkt liegt auf den ersten Jahren in den 60ern des 19. Jahrhunderts. Der Film schildert, wie Brown engagiert wird, sich gleich sehr eigenwillig, durchsetzungsstark und leicht arrogant an eine aktive Aufmunterung der sehr melancholischen (allerdings äußerlich von Judi Dench eher tough gespielten) Königin macht. Im weitere folgt in kleinen Episoden und Beschreibungen - ohne eine wirklich durchgehende Geschichte zu erzählen - die Intensivierung ihrer Beziehung, der Kampf des Hofstaates dagegen, die aufkommenden Gerüchte um eine engere Beziehung bis hin zu Attentatsdrohungen auf die Königin.

Der Film ist zunächst handwerklich sehr gut gemacht. Die Kulissen, die Atmosphäre (auf Schlössern, Landsitzen, im schottischen Hochland), die Kostüme sind toll gemacht und mit viel Gefühl und sehr schön photographiert. Schauspielerisch ist es zwar nicht die ganz große Offenbarung (keiner der Figuren ist mir so wirklich ans Herz gemacht), aber es ist hochwertig und professionell gespielt.

Dass mich der Film letztlich aber nicht so richtig überzeugt hat, liegt an der Darstellung der Geschichte. Zu loben ist zunächst, dass man darauf verzichtet, die Gerüchte um die erotische Beziehung zwischen den beiden stark in den Mittelpunkt zu stellen (sie werden thematisiert, aber sehr dezent) und auch keine eindeutige Stellung "Wahr oder nicht wahr" einnimmt. Das wäre ein billiger Effekt gewesen.

Problematisch war für mich aber, dass bei allem quasi dokumentarischen Erzählen der wahren Geschichte das dramaturgische Ziel des Films nicht klar wird. Was will er neben nüchterner Historie erzählen? Es gibt Ansätze von Freundschaft, Loyalität, Enge der Gesellschaft, Männlichkeit, Weiblichkeit, etc., aber alles bleibt angedeutet und verschwimmt im vielerlei der Andeutungen. So hat man bei aller Schönheit und handwerklichen Kunst der Einzelszenen das fortwährende Gefühl: Und? Was soll das jetzt? - Ich finde, hier hätte man sich dramaturigisch für einen Aspekt dieser historischen Geschichte entscheiden und ihn stärker herausarbeiten müssen.

Fazit: Ein gut gemachter Film, den man gut und gerne sehen kann; aber kein echtes Highlight und man hat auch nichts verpasst, wenn man ihn nicht gesehen hat. Sprache der UK-Fassung: Englisch (z.T. mit starken schottischem Akzent, aber tollen Stimmen) mit englischen UT.
0Kommentar|2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 28. Januar 2016
es geht hier um die Amazone-Prime Version:
Story:
- nett, unterhaltsam, mal etwas anderes.
- Eine gemächliche Gangart des Erzählens einer wohl teilweise historischen Geschichte.
- Gute Schauspieler aber trotzdem keine echten Höhen oder Tiefen, plätschert so dahin. Aber eine nette Alternative zu "Krach Bumm Peng"-Filmen. Gute Kulissen und Kostüme auch wenn manche Charaktäre wie z.B. der Premierminister -meiner Meinung nach- schon fast comicartig überzeichnet wirken und zumindest mich ein wenig gestört haben.

Bildqualität:
- weit entfernt von sehr gut
- Die hier in anderen Bewertungen hoch gelobten Aufnahmen der Highlands sind auch eher so lá lá (ich hab ihn mir tatsächlich deswegen angesehen und muss sagen es sind wenig gute und interessante Aufnahmen der Higlands im Film). Generell überzeugt der Film durchaus mit einer zurückhaltenden Ästhetik.

Würde ich ihn mir nochmal ansehen und empfehlen? Naja bedingt für nen langweiligen Tag wenn man mal krank im Bett liegt oder so ganz passend. Wenn man aufregendes oder echt anspruchsvolles Kino sucht eher nicht. Der Film setzt die ganze Zeit zum Sprung an um im filmischen Bereich des hohen Anspruchs zu landen, springt aber irgendwie nie ab. (meine Meinung ;-) )
0Kommentar|War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden
am 1. Februar 2006
That is the question. Of course, when one thinks of Victoria, the idea of prudishness, conservatism, and a very reserved manner in action and morality naturally come to mind. It was never unusual for monarchs, male or female, to have lovers outside of their marriages (indeed, it might be considered unusual for a monarch to have been thought to have remained faithful), but Victoria? The epitome of a repressive, almost oppresive morality? Surely not.
Don't be so sure.
Four years after the death of Prince Albert, to whom Victoria was completely devoted, and for whom she mourned in quite public and dramatic fashion, against the protests of her children and her ministers, John Brown, a favourite ghillie of the royal couple, was brought back into service of the Queen household.
Victoria's favouritism toward him, coupled with his own brash and blunt behaviour, caused him to be envied and disliked by members of her family, her household service, her ministers, and largely by the public. There were parodies of John Brown's activities, done up in the form of mock Court Circulars (the official listing of royal engagements), which appeared in the press on both sides of the Atlantic.
It is unknown if Brown actually kept a diary (the movie speculates such, but also states that no diary was ever found). There was a large black trunk of correspondence found after Victoria's death, between the Queen and her doctor at the time, Profeit, regarding John Brown. This came into the possession of her new doctor, Reid, who recorded 'most compromising' secrets into his green memorandum book. Alas, this book was burned by Reid's son, and the trunk was not found. Did it refer to a secret marriage between Victoria and John Brown, as was often speculated?
This is, in truth, unlikely -- Victoria's devotion to Albert never waned in her life, and there was a certain innocence, lack of pretense and guile in Victoria that the more political and suspicious (particularly in the press) would not have known. Both Brown and Victoria were outraged at the rumours. Brown was a servant who put no stock in class divisions and the artificiality of social conventions -- his familiarity with the Queen (in fact no different from his direct and familiar manner of relating to everyone) was simply his manner.
But then, everyone likes a good, juicy scandal, don't they? So much more interesting than decades of mourning, which makes for rather boring news leaders.
The film takes up the story with Brown's arrival at the royal residence on the Isle of Wight (an inaccuracy, as he was presented at Windsor first). The story is romantic yet reserved, and the cinematography is stunning. From the cloud-cast home on the Isle of Wight to the stately and foreboding Windsor scenes, to the unspoiled Highlands around Balmoral, this film has had great care infused in the details of costume, setting, and atmosphere.
Judi Dench gives perhaps the greatest performance of her life as the Queen, showing real emotion through the Victorian reserve in an admirable fashion (for which she was nominated for the Academy Award, and won the Golden Globe, as best actress). In a really surprising casting, Billy Connolly, best known as a comic, turns in a first class performance as John Brown, the brash Scotsman who becomes completely devoted to his Queen. Geoffrey Palmer, a solid actor known in many BBC productions, plays the Queen's private secretary, Sir Henry Ponsonby, who is continually amazed at the liberties taken by Brown (Ponsonby, in reality, saw Brown as a first class servant, and remarked so frequently in correspondence with others). This film was first proposed as a BBC television production, but ended up being so well performed and executed that it was transferred to become a cinematic release.
Given the high profile scandals of the royal family today, this story seems almost timid. But, history does repeat itself, so one can never be entirely sure, until such time as the royal archives are opened to scholars, perhaps a few centuries from now, and the truth may be known to posterity.
0Kommentar|9 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?JaNeinMissbrauch melden

Haben sich auch diese Artikel angesehen

0,99 €