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Hinterkind Vol. 1: The Waking World [Kindle Edition]

Ian Edginton , FRANCESCO TRIFOGLI

Kindle-Preis: EUR 5,56 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

In a post-apocalyptic world where humans have been pushed to the edge of extinction by the creatures of fantasy and fables, THE HINTERKIND tells the story of one young woman's quest to fulfill her destiny and put the world right again.

Fifty-seven years after an unspecified biological event has all but wiped out the human race, a green hand has moved over the face of the Earth. Leaf, root and shoot have steadfastly smothered the works of man, remorselessly grinding the concrete, glass and steel back into the minerals from whence they came. Mother Nature is reclaiming what's rightfully hers but she's not the only one...

The Hinterkind have returned. They come from hiding places in the lost corners of the world: Centaurs, Satyrs, Elves, Dwarves, Ogres, Trolls, Werewolves, Vampires...

They're also known as 'the Hidden,' 'the Twilight People,' the 'walkers-in-shadow', collective names for the menagerie that mankind has hung its tales of myth and magic upon--but these aren't fairy tale creatures. They are flesh, blood and passion, and they have a long simmering hatred of humanity.

They are a divergent species. Exotic evolutionary try-outs that couldn't compete with the rapacious ape. Hunted to near extinction through fear and ignorance, they fled to the great forests and deserts, losing themselves in the shrinking wilderness of an ever-expanding world.

Now the wilderness is the world and mankind is in the minority.

Collects THE HINTERKIND #1-6.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Edginton sees part of the key to his success coming from good relationships with artists, especially D'Israeli and Steve Yeowell as well as Steve Pugh and Mike Collins. He is best known for his steampunk/alternative history work (often with the artist D'Israeli) and is the co-creator of Scarlet Traces, a sequel to their adaptation of H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds. With 2000 AD he has written Leviathan, Stickleback and, with art by Steve Yeowell, The Red Seas, as well as one-off serials such as American Gothic (2005).

With D'Israeli he has created a number of new series including Stickleback, a tale of a strange villain in an alternative Victorian London, and Gothic, which he describes as "Mary Shelley's Doc Savage." With Simon Davis he recently worked on a survival horror series, Stone Island, and he has also produced a comic version of the computer game Hellgate: London with Steve Pugh. He is currently working on a dinosaurs and cowboys story called Sixgun Logic. Also as part of Top Cow's Pilot Season he has written an Angelus one-shot.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 99035 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 144 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vertigo (8. April 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00IUSN362
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Nicht aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #163.267 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  14 Rezensionen
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Fantastic Idea, Dull Execution 10. April 2014
Von SJ - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I am a big fan of the "Fables" and "The Unwritten" series, and was hoping that Hinterkind would be similar. After reading the first volume I felt distinctly underwhelmed.

The premise was great; an unspecified plague wiped out most of humanity, and in the wake of humankind's demise fairies, trolls, and other creatures from myth and legend return to reclaim a planet that humans excluded them from. Unfortunately, Edginton's writing and plot lines don't do his ideas justice.

The exposition didn't feel very smooth, the characters were bland and annoying, the actual details of the plot were boring and uninspired (though the general idea was fantastic). I had to force myself to keep reading past the halfway point. This is a story that had great potential, but fell short.

It's not terrible, but it simply wasn't good enough to entice me to read further.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Hybrid Fables meets Saga meets Walking Dead 7. Mai 2014
Von Lupin the 3rd - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Vertigo is on a roll hiring some of the best illustrators to illustrate their cover art from Nathan Fox to Greg Tocchini. Unfortunately, the great cover art doesn't quite translate with the interior artwork. Tocchini manages to translate a sense of wonder, awe, magic and appeal to the world of Hinterkind through his cover illustration. But the current interior artist seems more focused on the monthly grind artwork which reveals none of the "magic" from Tocchini capable hands. The premise for the book sounds all too familiar among comic book readers like a genre mash-up from the very successful SAGA, The Walking Dead and Fables. Of course, I'm an optimist and gave the title a chance since it's all about the execution to win me over.

The writing is very competent and clearly has a direction. But the panel is flooded with verbose dialogue leaning into becoming a reading chore. Sometimes certain writers keep forgetting the power of comics medium - visual storytelling. Action is character. Alfred Hitchcock understood the visual medium and the reason why his films has become the staple among every aspiring storytellers to study from Frank Miller to Mark Waid. Although I agree with many reviewers the writing execution seems somewhat dull and lacks the stylish/ sexy appeal like Brian K. Vaughn SAGA or Matt Fraction SEX CRIMINALS. It seems the writer is attempting to find humor and a style. Whether the readers will stick by and see the comic evolving is questionable. After reading the first volume this comic is a pass in my reading list. There's just too many other comics I find more interesting and excited.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Surprisingly good adventure. 10. Juli 2014
Von Ifty Zaidi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Of Vertigo's new line of ongoing titles this was the one I was least excited about but as it turns out I ended up enjoying it a whole lot more than I thought I would. My initial skepticism was based on the fact that this was touted as a genre mash-up: Post-apocalypse meets fairytales and honestly I kind of felt that both genres are starting to get a little shopworn in pop culture. Even if we limit ourselves to Vertigo's own titles we've seen a couple of great post-apocalyptic series in Y: The Last Man and Sweet Tooth and as for fairy tales there are Fables, Fairest, Unwritten, etc. Was there anything really new and interesting to be done by throwing these two genres together?

As it turned out I was in for a pleasant surprise. Firstly reading this I felt it owed more to a certain kind of fantasy adventure genre than it did to any of the previously mentioned titles. Think Fred Saberhagen's 'Empire of the East' series (or perhaps a more recent work might be Mark Lawrence's 'Prince of Thorns'). I suspect that some of the other reviewers were disappointed about this, hoping to find something with more in common with those earlier vertigo titles I mentioned. But this is basically a well-written and entertaining fantasy adventure rather than a post-apocalypse survival tale or a story of fairy-tales living in the human world. This first volume did a fairly good job about introducing the setting, introducing some of the main characters who we are obviously going to learn more about in future issues and also dropping plenty of hints that there is a whole lot more to this world to be encountered. The art is good, though on occasion I wasn't to taken by the colorist's odd style. Overall I enjoyed it thoroughly and I really hope that this title finds its audience and gets a good long run because there is obviously a whole lot more to discover about this world and these characters.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting premise 18. Mai 2014
Von Kindle Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I like the story ideas but the artwork is not my favorite style. The story has too many ignorant punks on every side for my taste
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Hinterkind: Human Beings Are Now an Endangered Species 11. April 2014
Von Brad Hawley Brad at FanLit - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
First posted on the review website Fantasy Literature.

Hinterkind: The Waking World by Ian Edginton (writer) and Francesco Trifogli (artist)

I’m not a big fan of post-apocalyptic stories, but Hinterkind pulled in this reluctant reader — twice. Initially, I bought the first two monthly issues because of the artwork and because it was a Vertigo title (DC’s mature line of comics), but I dropped the title because the plot didn’t grab me, and frankly, there was an abundance of monthly comics coming out — too much for this fan’s budget! However, when I saw the first six issues of Hinterkind collected together in trade and available for reviewers, I thought I’d give it another chance. I’m glad I did. The art is good all the way through and the plot not only improves with each issue, it fully hooked me by the end of the story arc. And now I want to read the rest of the series!

The story takes place after the human population has been vastly reduced, and we are introduced to a small band of humans who have claimed an area of land and stayed put, establishing roots and a small hierarchy of officials with everyone pulling their weight by doing the job they do best — some are doctors, while others have the dangerous job of hunting outside the safety of the camp, and others, some reluctantly, remain inside as gatherers. They have been in communication with a few other locations, but their radio signals have gone silent one after the other. As this series opens, we see the gruesome fate of the last community that our main characters had radio contact with.

This final sense of isolation and fear for others is what starts off the story: A trio heads off to find out what’s beyond their normal hunting range and to check on those whose radio communications were interrupted mid-broadcast. This group is led by Asa, the grandfather of our main character — Prosper — who is an attractive, teenage girl unhappy in her role as “planter.” Since she’s adventurous and good with a bow and arrow, she wants to earn “hunter” status. Her closest friend, Angus, goes with her while she hunts, and after only a few pages into the first issue, Prosper, along with the readers, discovers Angus’s secret, a revelation that sets the duo on a secret journey away from the settlement just after Prosper’s grandfather departed.

Once the journeys begin, we get to see the wonderful world that has emerged after our second fall. Eden returns in a twisted, but beautiful fashion: Zebras run around trees growing on skyscrapers, and old, dead cars are merely there to add a little bit of extra color amidst the flora and the fauna. But there’s an edge to this Eden that makes that one little snake in the first Eden look tame and cute. The planet has been returned to its rightful heirs: “The Hinterkind, the myriad races of myth, hounded to near-extinction, had returned full of rage and righteous fury to reclaim what was theirs.” And that “rage and righteous fury” turns this title into a near-horror comic in places, but more in the tradition of Swamp Thing than Hellboy. There are all types: satyr, cyclops, goblins, trolls, and anything else you can imagine, as well as some creatures that certainly have no names. But most importantly, the Sidhe — the elves — return to rule over all.

I think the scenes with the Sidhe present some of the best art in a book full of fantastical scenery that makes our post-apocalyptic world look beautiful instead of dreadful as do many post-apocalyptic artistic depictions. The message is the same in both types of depictions: humankind is really messing up the environment in our present, and if we keep on, this is what our world will look like. But this is usually a horrific depiction. I like the reverse in this comic; we humans are so miniscule and minor, the earth just needs some recovery time after we get out of the way, or as is phrased at the beginning of Hinterkind:

Calling it the end of the world was a conceit. The world kept ticking on just fine, it was humanity that took the hit. Seven months from top of the food chain to endangered species. Mother Nature breathed a sigh of relief. To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin, “Fish and house guests smell after three days.” By extension, after three hundred thousand years, we’d really stunk up the place. It took decades for the payback to come, but that’s what it does so well . . . the Earth abides.

The story starts off slow, but as I said at the start of this review, I was quite engaged by the end of the first six-issue arc of this new comic book series. I wanted to find out what was going to happen to these characters. And though visually I like the scenery the best, I also love the visual depictions of the wide variety of characters, particularly Prosper and several of the lead “bad guys.” Visually, my favorite “bad guy” is a bad girl-creature: Other than a mohawk, she’s bald and sports a complete punk aesthetic, including about six piercings per ear. The final, perfect touch visually is that her black, spiked hair is matched by her black moth-like, wings — no pretty, multi-colored butterfly wings for her! Prosper, on the other hand, has 70s-styled hair and offers the visual counter-statement to this punk look, but she isn’t just another pretty, hippie face — she’s strong, capable, and stubborn — and we want to follow her wherever she might go in this unpredictable and dangerous world-wide garden.

The only potential problem with the series is that there is just too much going on in the first six issues: Other than the two groups of journeying humans and the Sidhe with their conflicts, there are two very specific bands of creatures with unique, key characters. But that’s not all: We also meet a very odd group of human beings who have found an extremely disturbing way to stay alive (you’ll never guess!). And if that’s not enough, the final part of the sixth issue introduces yet another set of characters that are obviously going to come into play in upcoming issues.

To be fair, it’s a little hard to judge a comic book harshly for being too complex when it has only just started. I think it read too slowly at a monthly pace. I am enjoying Hinterkind much more now that I am able to sit down and read all six issues at once. And if Ian Edginton fulfills his ambitions in upcoming volumes, then his laying this complex groundwork will be well worth the effort. I would be wrong to fault a first volume for planting seeds for future volumes that end up bearing fruit as do the greatest fictional works, whether they be long-running comics or novels. And since I am satisfied by the main plot of volume one — “The Waking World” — I’m going to take a guess that the author knows what he’s doing in future volumes. The work is no slower starting than many of my favorite long-running comic book series, so I’d say that Hinterkind has the potential to be a work talked about for a long time to come.
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