Heartsick (Archie Sheridan & Gretchen Lowell series) und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 19,53
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 1 auf Lager
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Heartsick (Archie Sherida... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

Heartsick (Archie Sheridan & Gretchen Lowell) (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 4. September 2007


Alle 20 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Gebundene Ausgabe
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 19,53
EUR 17,03 EUR 2,49
3 neu ab EUR 17,03 15 gebraucht ab EUR 2,49
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 336 Seiten
  • Verlag: Minotaur Books; Auflage: 14., Neubearb. (4. September 2007)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0312368461
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312368463
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: 14 - 18 Jahre
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 14,7 x 2,9 x 25,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (5 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 796.797 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Chelsea Cain steps into a crowded, blood-soaked genre with Heartsick, a riveting, character-driven novel about a damaged cop and his obsession with the serial killer who...let him live. Gretchen Lowell tortured Detective Archie Sheridan for ten days, then inexplicably let him go and turned herself in. Cain turns the (nearly played out) Starling/Lecter relationship on its ear: Sheridan must face down his would-be killer to help hunt down another. What sets this disturbing novel apart from the rest is its bruised, haunted heart in the form of Detective Sheridan, a bewildered survivor trying to catch a killer and save himself. --Daphne Durham

Questions for Chelsea Cain

Amazon.com: Gretchen Lowell haunts every page of Heartsick. Even when she actually appears in the jail scenes with Sheridan, she reveals nothing, and yet it's obvious she's anything but one-dimensional. What is her story?

Cain: I purposely didn't reveal Gretchen's past, beyond a few unreliable hints. I thought there was a really interesting tension in not knowing what had driven this woman to embrace violence so enthusiastically. The less we know about killers' motives, the scarier they are. Maybe that's why people spend so much time watching 24-hour news channels that cover the latest horrible domestic murder. We want to understand why people kill. Because if we can peg it on something, we can tell ourselves that they are different than us, that we aren't capable of that kind of brutality. Plus this is the launch of a series and I thought it would be fun for readers to get to learn more about Gretchen as the series continues. I just finished Sweetheart, and I promise there's a lot more Gretchen to come.

Amazon.com: As a first-time thriller author, you've got to be elated to see early reviews evoke the legendary Hannibal Lecter. Did you anticipate readers to make that connection, or are there other serial series (on paper or screen) that inspired the story of Gretchen and Sheridan?

Cain: I thought that the connection to Lecter was inevitable since Heartsick features a detective who visits a jailed serial killer. But I wasn't consciously inspired by Silence of the Lambs (or Red Dragon, which is the Harris book it more accurately echoes). I grew up in the Pacific Northwest when the Green River Killer was at large, and I was fascinated by the relationship between a cop who'd spent his career hunting a killer (as many of the cops on the Green River Task Force did) and the killer he ends up catching. I'd seen an episode of Larry King that featured two of the Green River Task Force cops and they had footage of one of the cops with Gary Ridgway (the Green River Killer) in jail and they were chatting like old friends. They were both trying to manipulate one another. The cop wanted Ridgway to tell him where more bodies were. Ridgway is a psychopath and wanted to feel in control. But on the surface, they seemed like buddies having a drink together at a bar. It was kind of disturbing. I wanted to explore that. Making the killer a woman was a way to make the relationship even more intense. Making her a very attractive woman upped the ante considerably.

Amazon.com: Reading Heartsick I was actually reminded of some of my favorite books by Stephen King. Like him, you have an uncanny ability to make your geographical setting feel like a character all its own. Do you think the story could have happened in any other place than Portland?

Cain: Heartsick Hawaii would definitely have been a different book. (Archie Sheridan would have been a surfer. Susan would have worked at a gift shop. And Gretchen would have been a deranged hula girl.) I live in Portland, so obviously that played into my decision to set the book here. All I had to do was look out the window. Which makes research a lot easier. But I also think that the Pacific Northwest makes a great setting for a thriller, and it's not a setting that's usually explored. Portland is so beautiful. But it’s also sort of eerie. The evergreens, the coast, the mountains--the scale is so huge, and the scenery is so magnificent. But every year hikers get lost and die, kids are killed by sneaker waves on the beach, and mountain climbers get crushed by avalanches. Beauty kills. Plus it has always seemed like the Northwest is teeming with serial killers. I blame the cloud cover. And the coffee.

Amazon.com: In a lot of ways, Heartsick is more about the killer than the killings, and it’s hard not to suspect that Gretchen killed only to get to Sheridan. That begs the question: is the chase always better than the catch? As a writer, is it more exciting for you to imagine the pursuit--with its tantalizing push-and-pull--than the endgame?

Cain: The most interesting aspect of the book to me is the relationship between Archie and Gretchen. Really, I wrote the whole book as an excuse to explore that. The endgame is satisfying because it's fun to see all the threads come together, but it's the relationship that keeps coming back to the computer day after day.

Amazon.com: Your characters--Susan Ward in particular--are raw, tautly wired, imperfect but still have this irresistible tenderness. It's their motives and experiences that really drive the story and ultimately elevate it way beyond what you might expect going into a serial killer tale. How did you resist falling into something more formulaic? Did you know what shape Susan and the others would take going in?

Cain: I knew I wanted flawed protagonists. I'm a sucker for a Byronic hero. Thrillers often feature such square-jawed hero types, and I wanted a story about people just barely hanging on. The psychological component is really interesting to me, and I liked that Susan's neuroses are, in their own ways, clues. In many ways, I embraced formula. I love formula--there’s a reason it works. And I decided early on that I wasn't going to avoid clichés for the sake of avoiding them. Some clichés are great. My goal was not to write a literary thriller, but to take all the stuff I loved from other books and TV shows and throw them all together and then try to put my own spin on it. Heartsick is a pulpy page-turner with, I hope, a little extra effort put into the writing and the characters. Basically, I just wrote the thriller that I wanted to read.

(photo credit: Kate Eshelby)



Pressestimmen

Advance Praise for Heartsick and Chelsea Cain
 
"Heartsick has it all: a tortured cop, a fearless and quirky heroine, and what may be the creepiest serial killer ever created. This is an addictive read!"
---Tess Gerritsen
 
"With Gretchen Lowell, Chelsea Cain gives us the most compelling, most original serial killer since Hannibal Lecter."
---Chuck Palahniuk
 
"Chelsea Cain's novel is completely entrancing and totally original---what a read. Between the humanity of Portland cop Archie Sheridan and the chilling and twisted design of his beautiful nemesis, Gretchen Lowell, Heartsick is utterly unforgettable. Cain is a wonderful---and terrifying---storyteller."
---Dominick Dunne

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Nach einer anderen Ausgabe dieses Buches suchen.
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Auszug | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.4 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
4
4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
1
1 Sterne
0
Alle 5 Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Ein Ermittler, der die Ergreifung eines Serienkillers beinahe nicht überlebt hätte und nach einer langen Auszeit wieder reaktiviert wird, um eine neue Mordserie zu stoppen – einen Thriller mit einer solchen Ausgangssituation kennt man z.B. von Thomas Harris' “Red Dragon”, dem ersten Auftritt des berüchtigten Serienmörders Hannibal Lecter. Fast identisch beginnt jedoch auch “Heartsick” von Chelsea Cain: Auch ihr Protagonist Archie Sheridan ist nach einem verhängnisvollen Fall schwer traumatisiert aus dem Dienst ausgetreten und wird nun von seinen ehemaligen Vorgesetzten und Kollegen um Mithilfe gebeten. Der wohl auffälligste Unterschied zum Harris-Roman: Cains Teufel in Menschengestalt ist kein kannibalischer Intellektueller, sondern… eine Frau, noch dazu eine äußerst attraktive und gebildete, die als Psychologin sogar an den Ermittlungen gegen sich selbst mitgewirkt und die Ermittler auf eine falsche Fährte gelockt hat – bis es zu den eingangs erwähnten zehn Tagen kam, die das Leben beider dominierender Charaktere von “Heartsick” unwiderruflich verändert haben.

Was damals genau passiert ist, darum macht die Autorin lange Zeit ein großes Geheimnis und ködert ihre Leser lediglich sehr geschickt mit einigen spärlich gesäten Erinnerungsfetzen, in denen Archie auf sein Martyrium in den Fängen von Gretchen Lowell zurückblickt. Abgesehen davon macht sich die Serienmörderin in der Geschichte lange Zeit rar, schwebt aber dennoch wie eine schwarze Gewitterwolke über der gesamten Handlung.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von F. Paul Koontz am 27. Januar 2010
Format: Taschenbuch
The novel starts out very promising with a flashback in which we encounter Gretchen (a female serial killer, original in itself) who is about to torture her victim, police officer Archie (the scene is not particularily drastic which is a good thing, because this "wading through blood" is just striking and often used to distract readers from a sloppy story ). Two years later: Archie is still alive though mentally and physically scarred and Gretchen had turned herself in and is now an inmate in a high security prison. The time Archie spent witch his tormentor in her basement is told throughout the novel in additional flasbacks which are the, unfortunately only, strong point of the story, because the new case of the police officer, the main story, is just plain boring and utterly unoriginal. Gretchen although being no female Hannibal Lector (Clarice [Starling] is even mentioned once in the story) deserved much more. When you then for example read Cody McFadyen's "The Shadow Man", or the grandmother of all serial killer thrillers "The Silence of the Lambs" (not the two sequels which are horrible) you clearly realize, thet Cain's attempt plays in a much lower league.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Caro am 4. August 2007
Format: Taschenbuch
Ich hoffe, dass dies der erste Teil um Archie und seine Crew ist.

Ich habe das Buch nicht mehr aus der Hand gelegt, nachdem ich es begonnen hatte.

Die in Rückblenden erzählte Geschichte von Archie s Martyrium in der Gefangenschaft von Gretchen Lowell, sowie der neue Fall haben mich absolut in ihren Bann gezogen.
Für schwache Nerven allerdings nicht so geeignet. Was Gretchen so eingefallen ist, war schon ganz schön pervers.

Der nächste Roman um das psychologische Todesspiel zwischen Archie Sheridan und Gretchen Lowell ist im Limes Verlag bereits in Vorbereitung.

Inhaltsangabe:
Nur der grausamen Willkür von Gretchen Lowell verdankt Archie Sheridan, dass er noch lebt. Nachdem er die eiskalte Serienmörderin jahrelang gejagt hat, wird der Detective selbst ihr Opfer und erleidet in ihren Händen unvorstellbare Qualen. Doch in letzter Sekunde rettet sie sein Leben und stellt sich der Polizei. Seitdem folgt Archie jeden Sonntag dem gleichen zerstörerischen Ritual: Er erhöht seine Dosis Psychopharmaka und fährt zu Gretchen, die ihm im Gefängnis nach und nach die Namen ihrer Opfer und die Leichenfundorte verrät. Doch da ist noch etwas, das ihn zu der aufregend schönen Frau treibt und weswegen er sogar seine Familie verlassen hat ... Als erneut ein Serienmörder in Portland auftaucht und Sheridan die Fahndung übernimmt, hofft er, dadurch seine Obsession in den Griff zu bekommen. Viel zu spät erkennt er: Gretchens Netz reicht weiter als vermutet.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Caro am 4. August 2007
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Ich habe das Buch nicht mehr aus der Hand gelegt, nachdem ich es begonnen hatte.

Die in Rückblenden erzählte Geschichte von Archie s Martyrium in der Gefangenschaft von Gretchen Lowell, sowie der neue Fall haben mich absolut in ihren Bann gezogen.
Für schwache Nerven allerdings nicht so geeignet. Was Gretchen so eingefallen ist, war schon ganz schön pervers.

Der nächste Roman um das psychologische Todesspiel zwischen Archie Sheridan und Gretchen Lowell ist im Limes Verlag bereits in Vorbereitung.

Inhaltsangabe:
Nur der grausamen Willkür von Gretchen Lowell verdankt Archie Sheridan, dass er noch lebt. Nachdem er die eiskalte Serienmörderin jahrelang gejagt hat, wird der Detective selbst ihr Opfer und erleidet in ihren Händen unvorstellbare Qualen. Doch in letzter Sekunde rettet sie sein Leben und stellt sich der Polizei. Seitdem folgt Archie jeden Sonntag dem gleichen zerstörerischen Ritual: Er erhöht seine Dosis Psychopharmaka und fährt zu Gretchen, die ihm im Gefängnis nach und nach die Namen ihrer Opfer und die Leichenfundorte verrät. Doch da ist noch etwas, das ihn zu der aufregend schönen Frau treibt und weswegen er sogar seine Familie verlassen hat ... Als erneut ein Serienmörder in Portland auftaucht und Sheridan die Fahndung übernimmt, hofft er, dadurch seine Obsession in den Griff zu bekommen. Viel zu spät erkennt er: Gretchens Netz reicht weiter als vermutet.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen