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Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Baking Revolution Continues with 90 New, Delicious and Easy Recipes Made with Gluten-Free Flours (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 21. Oktober 2014


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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

From Living Without's favorite books: "Quick artisan breads, no kneading, no proofing, not punching down… You'll be on your way to delicious bread in no time." (Living Free's Gluten Free & More Magazine)

For gluten-free bread that tastes like it came from a European bakery, it's worth the wait. (Portland Oregonian)

…I baked a flatbread for a gluten-free friend-and no one suspected it was not its floury cousin… the book's recipes for blending your own gluten-free flours are easy and fail-safe. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

The authors met in their children's music class in 2003 and wrote the best-selling Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, and Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day.


Jeff Hertzberg, M.D. grew up eating New York pizza and spent years trying to figure out how to make dough that was convenient enough to use for daily pizza, flatbreads, and loaves. But really, he just wanted to learn to throw pizza dough high into the air. He lives in Minneapolis with his wife and two daughters.


Zoë François is a pastry chef trained at the Culinary Institute of America, but she is a pizzaiola at heart. While writing this book she traveled far and wide to eat every pizza and flatbread she could find. In addition to tossing pizzas she creates desserts on her pastry blog. She lives in Minneapolis with her husband and two sons.

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77 von 78 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
EXCELLENT GF Bread--results from four weeks of testing (APPLE CIDER BEIGNETS!!!) 5. November 2014
Von Living it up - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
11/14 UPDATE: Hi GF buddies, I've got a lot of info below; but what I really think you need to know is that we just got through eating two plates of GF Apple Cider Beignets and they were DELICIOUS! We're from Louisiana and know our way around a beignet. While I am very concerned about creating a healthful, wholesome GF loaf of bread; but I almost wept it was so wonderful to bite into those fried puffs of cinnamon sugar coated heaven this morning accompanied by a mug of cafe au lait and a crackling fire (queen of the world today!). It felt so NORMAL! I used the Apple Cider Brioche dough (xanthan gum, don't think psyllium would have made such a perfect sweet dough) and let it sit in frig for about 36 hours. It rose beautifully into a soft orb of fragrant dough (once you read the recipe you will have a hard time believing it could be edible). The dough rolled out easily on rice flour dusted counter--no sticking, tearing or drama. The authors recommend rolling dough 1/2" thick so I fried one per instructions. It was good but a tiny bit doughy. I went 1/3" thick next and it fried up perfect. But, being a fan of the "real deal" I wanted a fatter, puffier beignet. My best results were rolling the dough 1/4" thick, folding in half onto itself and lightly rolling til I got about 1/3". That gave me best results, as did frying at 375. Bonus points, whereas the cooking oil is ruined rather quickly with flour-based beignets, this dough didn't mess up the oil at all. This same dough can be used for traditional doughnuts if that is your happy place :>). Bon appetit! I used the remaining Apple Cider Brioche dough to make the Apple Pear Cranberry Coffee Cake. The dough/fruit mix turned out delicious, but we did not like how sickeningly sweet the streusel topping turned out, and there was way too much of it. Recipe called for half the streusel in middle and half on top. Next time I will make 1/3 the streusel mixture, substitute oat flour (didn't like the sandiness of the rice flour in this context) and only sprinkle on top layer. The pear sweetens the fruit mix nicely and I want to taste fruit not sugar.
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2014 has been the year of the search for tasty, edible gluten-free products. The search has been frustrating, expensive and mostly unsuccessful. For the most part I've decided I'd just rather go without than eat mediocre food. "Sandwiches" are made with various fillings piled in a crunchy romaine leaf. A couple of gluten-free crackers that I actually really like hold my goat cheese and salamis in place. I've got one good cold cereal on the list and am glad I already loved gluten-free steel cut oats.

I sold all of my beautiful bread-baking books (old friends one and all) because it made me sad to see their bindings and know I won't enjoy the end result of all that hard work those great bakers put into their books. I sold all of my "five minute bread" cookbooks as well after copying the few gluten free recipes I liked.

I can honestly say I wasn't expecting much from this new effort by Hertzberg and Francois; but appreciated that they took the time to do this. When this cookbook came up on amazon vine for review I grabbed it fast.

I've spent the past two weeks baking from the books and am learning how to make a satisfying gluten-free loaf (that my husband didn't know was gluten free-hooray!). Like all bread baking a truly excellent loaf requires a bit of alchemy--terrific fresh ingredients, good clean water, crunchy seeds/grains, etc; but mostly excellent technique. I think most people will be able to make an edible loaf from this cookbook that beats a $6-7 store-bought loaf. People who are patient and are already good at baking bread are likely going to be able to make a very good to excellent loaf using any number of a variety of recipes. If you weigh ingredients, use a good mixer, have a baking stone and a well calibrated oven you're golden :>).

I started by making one bucket of the #1 all-purpose flour mix and one bucket of the #2 whole grain flour mix (hooray that I kept all my bread making equipment!). I used about 30% of the flours/starches from Bob's Red Mill products and the remainder from the bulk grain section of a large international farmers market near me. The prices at the Farmers market were about 50-75% less than Bobs (for organic). I have a grain grinder and have purchased the grains called for in the book and will be grinding my own flour for the next big batch of mixes (and will post my results as my grinder will not get quite as powdery a result as commercially ground flours). I am using xanthan gum right now but want to experiment with the psyllium husk alternative soon (the two ingredients the authors use to approximate some type of "rise" in the bread. I hope others who have actually tried these recipes will be generous in posting their experiences.

I share this because I priced out the cost to make each batch of mix. It cost ~$9.95 to make 4.3# of #1 all purpose mix. That will provide the flour to make ~7-1/2 of the basic boule recipe. With yeast, sugar, and salt that comes to about $1.50 per finished boule.

It cost ~$9.85 to make 4# of the #2 whole grain mix. That will provide the flour to make ~10 loaves of the 100% whole grain loaf. The whole grain loaf calls for the addition of some other flours/grains (including my favorite version with buckwheat). The cost for my finished loaves of the 100% whole grain was ~$1.70. The most expensive loaf made thus far was the seeded whole grain at $2.20.

I started off with the #1 and #2 mixes as per the book. I've made changes in my quest for a great gluten-free bread and know this will be an ongoing process. I've found that both mixes make a much better bread with some millet flour and oat flour in the mix. I add some teff flour to the #2 mix as well. I don't care for the results using just white rice flour in the #1 mix so I use a blend of white and brown rice flours.

I highly recommend you not bake with the mixed doughs until after at least two days in the refrigerator. Gluten-free breads really develop a much better and more complex taste with this longer period and all of the grains are fully hydrated. I use the "old dough" technique that I used when making regular breads and that also helps to create a much better loaf (save some of your old dough and mix it into the next batch--simple).

You definitely will have the best results if you weigh the ingredients--they are so very different from wheat flour in how they fill a measuring cup.

If it's hot outside and you don't want your kitchen to be miserable, I've had good results using my cast iron dutch oven on my gas grill. I turn on the two outside burners, preheat the dutch oven and lid to 450, toss some corn meal in the dutch oven and plop the dough in. From there cook as if in oven. If you use cornmeal on your pizza peel you know how quickly 450 ovens burn the stray cornmeal so you also eliminate that yucky smell from your house.

My next experiment from this cookbook is to try the bread in a crockpot. I have to make sure mine can be used without water and if so will update with results of that experiment.

In summary I like that this book is simple enough for a beginner but allows more seasoned bakers (and perhaps even pros!) to use ingredients and techniques that they love (sourdough starter, old doughs, longer ferments, stones, dutch ovens, whatever works for you).

You definitely will have the best results if you weigh the ingredients--they are so very different from wheat flour in how they fill a measuring cup.

If it's hot outside and you don't want your kitchen to be miserable, I've had good results using my cast iron dutch oven on my gas grill. I turn on the two outside burners, preheat the dutch oven and lid to 450, toss some corn meal in the dutch oven and plop the dough in. From there cook as if in oven. If you use cornmeal on your pizza peel you know how quickly 450 ovens burn the stray cornmeal so you also eliminate that yucky smell from your house.

My next experiment from this cookbook is to try the bread in a crockpot. I have to make sure mine can be used without water and if so will update with results of that experiment.

In summary I like that this book is simple enough for a beginner but allows more seasoned bakers (and perhaps even pros!) to use ingredients and techniques that they love (sourdough starter, old doughs, longer ferments, stones, dutch ovens, whatever works for you).
54 von 56 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Easy, delicious bread 24. Oktober 2014
Von Curious Cook - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
In all seriousness, this makes the only decent GF bread I've tried since being diagnosed. Is it exactly like wheat bread? No. Is it tasty and good? Yes. You can bake it in a Dutch oven if you like it crusty, you can bake it in a loaf pan for sandwiches, or free form. I used 1/2 batch for the loaf pictured, and would probably go 1/3 next time. Toasts well. This is the rare GF book that's worth the investment. I use a stand mixer to make the dough, and then pop it in the fridge until I want to bake.
27 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
It's easy if you're skilled and have the right equipment, but probably worth the effort and investment 21. November 2014
Von J. Loscheider - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
I love baking bread. I've loved baking bread since I was a kid and my dad's cousin taught us all the family recipes - onion bread, cheese bread, sourdough, potica, etc. When I went on a gluten-free diet nearly 5 years ago, having freshly baked bread was one of the hardest things to give up (that and good beer, deep dish pizza and ... no, no regrets, I'm healthier now). I mostly make sandwich breads in the bread machine, and occasionally a gluten-free focaccia or coffee cake, but otherwise I don't do much gluten-free bread baking because it's just so different from using gluten dough.

So Hertzberg and Francois' "Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day" really caught my eye. It's not easy and I'm going to keep trying out their advice and recipes, but I have to say I've not gotten it down yet. I should disclose here that I'm reviewing a copy I received for free through the Amazon Vine program, and I have to review it within a set period of time, so I will post updates as I have more success.

Artisan loaves are the kind you buy at a bakery, a Panera, an Au Bon Pain, or specialty store. You may not use them for sandwiches. The recipes can be complex and often involve kneading, twisting, shaping, things that gluten dough does marvelously (a challah is a beautiful thing) but gluten-free dough just doesn't cooperate enough to do. One of the big differences is that you don't knead gluten-free dough, because it doesn't have the same structure and it doesn't keep the gas as well so it doesn't rise as much. This makes gluten-free dough much harder to work with.

The premise of Hertzberg and Francois is straight-forward and promising:
1) Make a big batch (like 6 pounds) of dough on one day and put it in the fridge. That takes more than five minutes but it concentrates most of the work into one period (maybe 20 minutes).
2) Pull out one pound at a time, let it rise a bit. That takes no time.
3) Shape the dough, preheat the oven, do whatever you need to help it along. That's the five minute part.
4) Let it cool to eat it so it isn't doughy in the middle (a common problem in gluten-free baking).

Here's the difficult part. Their dough recipe is rather stubborn. You have to really really mix it well. You have to let it rise to the right point (I need to be more patient), and you need to use steam to bake it. I haven't found the sweet spot yet of amount of water, dish size (relative to the baking stone), ambient moisture, and rack placement. My first loaves were a struggle to cut but made a nice set of croutons once I let them go stale. I think I'm getting there, though I will say that to do this right you can't shortcut with a jelly roll pan or an airbake flat - it really needs to be a baking stone.

So this book is for rather serious bakers. Total opposite of "throw in the wet, throw in the dry, hit start". You will have to fuss quite a bit, at least at first, to get the recipes right.

Let's talk about the recipes for a minute. If you like having your ingredients on one page, instructions on the next ,you won't navigate this book well. The authors look to the art of bread baking and as such the recipes are a little free-form. You have your ingredients, your instructions, but you also have a few options in many recipes - if you want to skip the refrigeration step, if you want to use a wicker baking basket, if you want to use a dutch oven, etc. This is going to feel less organized though I appreciate that the authors recognize that most readers aren't going to get the first recipe right the first time. So it comes across as more helpful even if it's not laid out neatly as Betty Crocker.

I gave this three stars because, well, it's a lot of work and I am pretty fond of what my bread machine can do (even if it's been five years since I've had a baguette), but I'm also willing to keep working with this and I might revise upwards once I get past the learning curve. Stay tuned.
35 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
GF bread is improving! 4. November 2014
Von H. Grove (errantdreams) - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I’m a huge fan of Hertzberg and Francois’s original Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day cookbook. We got it years ago and we still make bread from it. It’s a great way to fit fresh bread into a busy schedule.

One of the authors asked if I’d like to use and review the new Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: The Baking Revolution Continues with 90 New, Delicious and Easy Recipes Made with Gluten-Free Flours. I warned him that I don’t cook gluten-free and thus couldn’t judge it from that direction, but that I’d be happy to judge it against non-GF breads and provide that perspective.

[NOTE: this means I received the book free of charge to review]

The process is like this: you mix together a bunch of gluten-free dry ingredients following one or another set of instructions. (One of those possible mixtures is whole-grain.) You’ll need to have something like a Whole Foods near you–or a good online source–to find all of the unusual flours you’ll need. When you want to make bread you use a certain amount of one of those mixtures, add things like yeast and water; mix, rise, and fridge. Any time you want bread you shape a loaf from the dough, let it rise, and then bake (on either a preheated oven stone or a sheet pan). Let cool, and eat. That’s it.

We made three particular recipes out of this book in order to test it out. We made the basic recipe. We used the whole-grain mixture to make a half-whole grain batch. And finally we made the Portugese broa–bread with cornmeal in it–because it’s our favorite recipe from the original book. This selection made it easy for us to draw comparisons with the original book.

The plain basic recipe is my favorite in the gluten-free edition of the cookbook. It smells just like any other wonderful bread while baking. You have to wait to serve it until it’s fully cooled or the insides can get a little squooshy (that’s a technical term). The bread tasted delicious. It was dense (and thus very filling), had a crust that was more crunchy than crisp. The shape was a little ‘shaggy’–it was hard to shape the dough smoothly and it didn’t have enough oven spring to correct that. The flavor was wonderful, and I particularly recommend slices of this bread with a bit of butter and honey.

The half-whole grain bread wasn’t as good, although we still enjoyed it. The hard crust, dense texture, and shaggy shape were a little more pronounced here. The broa had similar problems. It’s my least favorite so far of the GF breads, even though it’s my most favorite in the original book. In the dense, mildly gummy GF bread, the bits of cornmeal seem really out of place. We tried both baking stones and sheet pans, steam and no steam, with little enough difference between the results.

Now, I was reading some of the helpful material that comes before the recipes–equipment, etc. The book suggested that a pale crust, undercooked crumb, and thick crust could mean that the oven’s temperature is off. Given how perfectly that meshed with our experiences, we believed that meant our oven was running cool. We got a new oven thermometer, because I didn’t want to blame imperfect loaves on the book if there was a problem on our end. However, it turned out that our oven, which has really seen better days, is spot-on in its heating.

So, to sum up: A person who has no need to eat gluten-free isn’t going to mistake these loaves for ‘normal’ bread any time soon. If you can’t have regular bread, however, it smells and tastes like the real thing; I expect it would be worth the textural issues. And of course, given that it can be a pain to put together all the myriad of ingredients for GF bread, using a cookbook that makes dough for a handful of loaves at a time is ideal.
32 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Feeling Hopeful - Lots To Try Here 24. Oktober 2014
Von ChristineMM - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts ( Was ist das? )
Missing out on great bread has been one of the things that's the worst about living gluten-free which I did under doctor's orders for medical reasons. I've found a box mix for a GF sandwich bread that I doctored up but it's not the same as the artisan type breads with thick crusts, deep flavor and big air pockets. Prior to finding out I needed to stop eating gluten I enjoyed baking from scratch for over 20 years, including bread and artisanal bread using cast iron dutch ovens (I bought four to use all at once)! Learning GF baking is another whole project rife with challenges. Many of the qualities we want from GF baked goods are not possible without gluten.

I have high hopes for this book but after baking two loaves I rate this book 4 stars.

First I don't like the black and white photos throughout, I would prefer color. Even at its price for hardcover I think $5 or even $10 more would be worth it. I own or see other cookbooks in the under $40 range that are prolifically filled with full color images. The black backgrounds in those images mean the images do not pop and they are not visually appealing in any way. See: Weber's Way To Grill which has step by step full color photos on every page. There is a center section of color images but that's not good enough.

I have been using mixture #1. The method is to first mix up a large batch of dry flours and ingredients then to keep that in your pantry. The next step is to only use some of that mix to make a dough by adding the water, yeast and sugar or honey. Then this wet dough is moved to the refrigerator. The recommendation is to use a GRAPEFRUIT sized ball of wet dough to shape a loaf, let it rise one hour, then bake it. The five minute name comes from the prep work on the day of baking only.

Update 1: After aging the wet mix in the fridge for over a week the next two loaves of baguette and a wider french loaf had more taste and thick crunchy crust baked on the pizza stone with pan of water in oven as per directions. Feeling more hope.

Update 2: The flat bread made with mixture #1 is fantastic. I chose onion and rosemary with parmesan cheese. The dough was crunchy and crisp. I made 2 at that same time with normal flour as it was for a big pot luck party and 1 with this GF recipe and everyone liked it better, even the non-GF people.

Update 3: There is a big difference with flavor if you let it sit in the refrigerator for a number of weeks. If you have the room in your refrigerator I advise making up a big batch like 5 or 6 at one time. Remember that one recipe's worth is a grapefruit size of dough and it does not rise much so honestly 2 people can eat an entire french baguette as an appetizer.

Update 4: The bread is definitely more crunch with use of a pizza baking stone instead of on a pan. Be sure to follow directions for brushing top of the bread with water and adding a pan of water to the oven if the recipe advises to do it. This allows for it to get a crunchy crust.

**I have updated to 5 stars.**

I will be using recipe #2 in the near future. I just learned at a lecture about gluten-free baking that teff flour has the highest hope ffor a crunchy bread crust that also browns during baking.

There are two flour mixes given and then there is a substitutions list. I made mixture #1 and for rice flour I did a half white half brown combination. Another option in the book is to use cast iron to cook in and since I know that method very well I decided to give it a try. In the photo I shared you can see the results. I learned that when baking inside the cast iron pot, that it needs a longer baking time. The crust stays softer which is the opposite effect of what happens with the gluten bread method. The interior was softer and it was more chewy. The loaf baked on the pizza stone was more golden brown, a harder crust you really had to work at and it had a good texture. However despite the use of yeast it did not puff up high at all, the loaf was an inch high. In order to use a grapefruit sized piece of dough and get a loaf that equals the volume of a typical artisan gluten-loaf you would have to make five or six GF loaves! These first two loaves made with the new dough didn't have much flavor. I am interested to see what happens over time.

I plan to keep using this cookbook with an open mind. I am curious to see when I can make a loaf that looks like the photos on the cover. If I keep having mediocre results I will revise this review to be more harsh and will include the number of loaves I've baked and the different recipes I've tried.

There is a chapter at the beginning for newbies to discuss gluten issues with medical conditions.

I rate the book 4 stars = I Like It because it's the closest thing so far to an artisan loaf of GF bread.
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